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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

P. Krysl

The present paper describes a Fortran library FLIPP constituting arun‐time environment that is linked to scientific applications software(such as finite‐element analysis…

Abstract

The present paper describes a Fortran library FLIPP constituting a run‐time environment that is linked to scientific applications software (such as finite‐element analysis programs) to support programming of interactive program control and use of persistent user‐defined dynamic data structures. The system consists of control and data definition and manipulation subsystems. The FLIPP routines are fully‐portable standard Fortran 77 procedures and the use of FLIPP leads the programmer to information hiding, e.g. as in object‐oriented systems. Program design and maintenance are facilitated to a considerable degree, while at the same time the performance of the programs using the FLIPP system remains fairly good as demonstrated by the examples.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Amin Mahmoudi, Mohammad Reza Feylizadeh, Davood Darvishi and Sifeng Liu

The purpose of this paper is to propose a method for solving multi-objective linear programming (MOLP) with interval coefficients using positioned programming and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a method for solving multi-objective linear programming (MOLP) with interval coefficients using positioned programming and interactive fuzzy programming approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

In the proposed algorithm, first, lower and upper bounds of each objective function in its feasible region will be determined. Afterwards using fuzzy approach, considering a membership function for each objective function and finally using grey linear programming, the solution for this problem will be obtained.

Findings

According to the presented example, in this paper, the proposed method is both simple in use and suitable for solving different problems. In the numerical example mentioned in this paper, the proposed method provides an acceptable solution for such problems.

Practical implications

As in most real-world situations, the coefficients of decision models are not known and exact. In this paper, the authors consider the model of MOLP with interval data, since one of the solutions to cover uncertainty is using interval theory.

Originality/value

Based on using grey theory and interactive fuzzy programming approaches, an appropriate method has been presented for solving MOLP problems with interval coefficients. The proposed method, against the complex methods, has less effort and offers acceptable solutions.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

MASATOSHI SAKAWA and HITOSHI YANO

This paper presents an interactive fuzzy satisfying method by assuming that the decision maker (DM) has fuzzy goals for each of the objective functions in multiobjective…

Abstract

This paper presents an interactive fuzzy satisfying method by assuming that the decision maker (DM) has fuzzy goals for each of the objective functions in multiobjective nonlinear programming problems. The fuzzy goals of the DM are quantified by eliciting the corresponding membership functions through the interaction with the DM. After determining the membership functions for each of the objective functions, in order to generate a candidate for the satisficing solution which is also a Pareto optimal, the DM selects an appropriate standing membership function and specifies his/her aspiration levels of achievement of the other membership functions, called constraint membership values. For the DM's constraint membership values, the corresponding constraint problem is solved and the DM is supplied with the Pareto optima] solution together with the trade‐off rates between a standing membership function and each of the other membership functions. Then by considering the current values of the membership functions as well as the trade‐off rates, the DM acts on this solution by updating his/her constraint membership values. In this way, the satisficing solution for the DM can be derived efficiently from among a Pareto optimal solution set by updating his/her constraint membership values. On the basis of the proposed method, a time‐sharing computer program is written and an application to regional planning is demonstrated along with the corresponding computer outputs.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Jason B. Forsyth and Thomas L. Martin

To be successful, pervasive computing requires a balance of computing, design, and business requirements to be considered throughout the design process. Achieving this…

Abstract

Purpose

To be successful, pervasive computing requires a balance of computing, design, and business requirements to be considered throughout the design process. Achieving this synthesis requires a level of interdisciplinary design that is not present in current pervasive design tools. To understand the state of the art and provide insight to future tool designers, the purpose of this paper is to present a survey of design tools for pervasive computing and consider their ability to be used in interdisciplinary design.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have performed a survey of tools covering many areas within pervasive computing and have evaluated the abilities of each tool with established metrics for pervasive design tools.

Findings

While the paper has found many design tools are available for constructive pervasive applications, few are suitable through all phases of the design cycle or useful across all the intended application domains of pervasive computing.

Originality/value

This survey provides an understanding of the state of pervasive design tools, with regards to interdisciplinary design, which has not previously been performed. Additionally, the authors provide evaluations of the pervasive tools when used in an interdisciplinary setting. These evaluations provide insight to key metrics and allow tool designers to understand the needs of their intended audience.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

Eric Parsloe

What Is “Interactive Video”? Interactive video is a phrase which is suddenly cropping up all over the place, in journals, at seminars, in the popular press. But what does…

Abstract

What Is “Interactive Video”? Interactive video is a phrase which is suddenly cropping up all over the place, in journals, at seminars, in the popular press. But what does it mean? And what does it mean to you? Is it just another buzz‐phrase? Or is it a term which is soon going to enter our training vocabulary? Well, I think it is a revolutionary new medium — and in the course of this article, I mean to convince you of my belief.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

José P. Duarte and Rodrigo Correia

The current goal is to implement a description grammar that generates housing briefs based on user and site data. The ultimate goal is to customize mass housing. This…

Abstract

The current goal is to implement a description grammar that generates housing briefs based on user and site data. The ultimate goal is to customize mass housing. This paper discusses these issues. Previous research proposed a mathematical model for the automatic generation of customized designs based on description and shape grammars. This paper describes the implementation of a description grammar that codifies the Portuguese housing design guidelines, as well as the intelligence of a human designer using them inferred after experimental work. Knowledge was sequentially converted from table format into English, Mathematical notation, and then the CLIPS language. Java Experts system Shell is the rule application engine, and JAVA and XML are used for coding theinterface and information tables, respectively.It describes how to implement a description grammar and it shows the feasibility of using them for automating the generation of housing briefs that contain enough technical information for design. In a subsequent step, it permits the automatic generation of housing solutions in real time. Backtracking is limited, theinterface does not provide visual clues for improving understanding of the available options, and the brief does not record intuitive or emotional information. It can help designers identifying the specifications of their clients' houses. It can be linked to a system that automatically generates, in a given language, housing solutions that match such specifications, thereby enabling the mass customization of housing. This paper describes the first practical implementation of a description grammar found in the literature.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Drew Davidson

Seeks to explores the idea of career‐focused, vocational higher education and give an overview of the current offerings of degrees, programs and majors that focus on

Abstract

Purpose

Seeks to explores the idea of career‐focused, vocational higher education and give an overview of the current offerings of degrees, programs and majors that focus on games, simulations and interactive media.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides an overview of educational courses supplied by various institutions which are capitalising on student and industry demand by offering officially accredited degrees in the study of games.

Findings

Students benefit most from the developing educational trend, and it makes economic sense for institutions to update their offerings to allow pedagogy to improve as the concept of what is involved in higher education expands.

Originality/value

Explores specifically how institutions are capitalizing on student and industry demand by offering officially accredited degrees in the study of games.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Brena Smith

The purpose of this paper is to explore and emphasize the impact of academic computer game studies programs on library services and collections.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and emphasize the impact of academic computer game studies programs on library services and collections.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature related to the relationship between gamers, game studies, and libraries, precedes discussion of the background of academic computer game studies programs. The potential challenges and opportunities concerning collection development, information literacy instruction, and reference within academic libraries are addressed along with highlights of emerging best practices.

Findings

The paper provides analysis of game studies as an emerging academic discipline and of the scholarly communication within this field. It also highlights emerging practices within academic librarians serving students and faculty in this field.

Research limitations/implications

Because game studies is a new discipline, best practices to meet users' needs are just beginning to be established for academic libraries. Further research is needed in the area of information‐seeking behavior, perception of game studies' students and faculty, and their information literacy skills.

Practical implications

This is an opportunity for librarians who serve students and faculty in game studies to learn about the history of this discipline and what several academic librarians are currently doing to meet their needs in collection development, information literacy instruction, and reference services.

Originality/value

While discussing the history of game studies as an academic program, the paper also highlights the issues related to library services and collections for the emerging academic discipline of game studies in an effort to support academic librarians who work with game studies students and faculty.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Hongfei Li and Sai Deng

The purpose of this paper is to examine dynamic mapping of holding locations to the animated maps in a library catalog which aims to resolve complex shelving situations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine dynamic mapping of holding locations to the animated maps in a library catalog which aims to resolve complex shelving situations, augment the user experience in locating library materials and enrich the Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) by integrating external programming into the Integrated Library System (ILS).

Design/methodology/approach

Dynamic mapping displays animated direction maps for users to locate quickly the items found in the library catalog. The maps are displayed in accordance with various shelving policies. At Wichita State University Libraries, the original bibliographic data are captured from the record results page in the OPAC and transferred to a processing program residing on another server. Instead of transferring ISBN/ISSN (International Standard Book Number/ International Standard Serial Number, as practiced by some libraries) to display the Syndetic cover images, it transfers bibliographic ID and a few other fields from MARC (MAchine‐Readable Cataloging) records to a processing program which queries the ILS database for extracting data needed for the dynamic map processing. The dynamic map system consists of three sections: queried data from the ILS database, programming logic, and dynamic maps.

Findings

Compared to title‐level shelving map displays that have been implemented in some libraries, holding level map displays solve the problem of complex shelving situations, such as a title with multiple copies shelved in different locations and/or in different formats.

Originality/value

This project received very positive feedback from the library community and this paper will provide information to those libraries which are interested in dynamically presenting holding information in their OPAC.

Details

New Library World, vol. 109 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1988

Barry Smith

The basic information required by trainers who wish to use video to achieve training outcomes is presented for those who are not experts at video production, do not have…

Abstract

The basic information required by trainers who wish to use video to achieve training outcomes is presented for those who are not experts at video production, do not have the time or the interest to become expert, do not have, and do not wish to develop, expertise in electronics and do not have access to sufficient organisational resources to hire an expert. The essential information needed to make experiences with video as productive, creative and problem‐free as possible is included.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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