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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2019

Ji-yeon Lee, Dong Woo Ko and Hyemin Lee

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the predictors of game addiction based on loneliness, motivation and inter-personal competence using the samples of college…

2191

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the predictors of game addiction based on loneliness, motivation and inter-personal competence using the samples of college students recruited from South Korea (n=251).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examined the underlying mechanism of game addiction by testing a moderated mediation model, in which inter-personal competence moderated the mediation model of loneliness, regulatory focus and online game addiction. First, the authors clarified the relationship among loneliness, motivation and inter-personal competence, to understand the influences of loneliness on other variables in this study (mediation test). Second, the authors examined the underlying mechanism of game addiction by testing a moderated mediation model, in which inter-personal competence moderated the mediation model of loneliness, regulatory focus and online game addiction (moderated mediation).

Findings

Regulatory focus mediated the effect of loneliness on online game addiction. Moderated mediation analyses using PROCESS confirmed that inter-personal competence significantly buffered the indirect effect of loneliness (through regulatory focus) on online game addiction. The findings indicated that inter-personal competence accounted for significant differences in the mediation models.

Originality/value

This study bridges the gap in the online game addiction literature by explaining how loneliness is associated with online game addiction.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2018

Eureta Rosenberg, Heila Betrie Lotz-Sisitka and Presha Ramsarup

The purpose of this paper is to share and analyse the methodology and findings of the 2016 Green Economy Learning Assessment South Africa, including learning needs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share and analyse the methodology and findings of the 2016 Green Economy Learning Assessment South Africa, including learning needs identified with reference to the competency framings of Scharmer (2009) and Wiek et al. (2011); and implications for university and work-based sustainability education, broadly conceptualised in a just transitions framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The assessment was conducted using desktop policy reviews and an audit of sustainability education providers, online questionnaires to sector experts, focus groups and interviews with practitioners driving green economy initiatives.

Findings

Policy monitoring and evaluation, and education for sustainable development, emerged as key change levers across nine priority areas including agriculture, energy, natural resources, water, transport and infrastructure. The competencies required to drive sustainability in these areas were clustered as technical, relational and transformational competencies for: making the case; integrated sustainable development planning; strategic adaptive management and expansive learning; working across organisational units; working across knowledge fields; capacity and organisational development; and principle-based leadership. Practitioners develop such competencies through formal higher education and short courses plus course-activated networks and “on the job” learning.

Research limitations/implications

The paper adds to the literature on sustainability competencies and raises questions regarding forms of hybrid learning suitable for developing technical, relational and transformative competencies.

Practical implications

A national learning needs assessment methodology and tools for customised organisational learning needs assessments are shared.

Originality/value

The assessment methodology is novel in this context and the workplace-based tools, original.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2019

Jantje Halberstadt, Jana-Michaela Timm, Sascha Kraus and Katherine Gundolf

The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on how service learning approaches are able to foster social entrepreneurship competences. The aim of the paper is to formulate a…

1561

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on how service learning approaches are able to foster social entrepreneurship competences. The aim of the paper is to formulate a framework of key competences for social entrepreneurship and to give first insights in how service learning actually has an impact on change in students’ set of competences.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a mixed-methods approach combining qualitative data collectionmethods of learning diaries of the students and semi-structured interviews, including 40 master’s students studying at a German university in interdisciplinary learning settings and five instructors from the same universities. Analysis was carried out by means of qualitative content analysis.

Findings

This paper provides empirical insights about the competences that are being fostered by service learning. From these, a framework for social entrepreneurship competences is being derived.

Research limitations/implications

The set of competences should be further investigated, as it was derived out of a small data set. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to use the set of competences for social entrepreneurship as a basis for future research and on a longer-term perspective, which lead to substantial implications for educational practice.

Practical implications

This paper includes implications for new perspectives on service learning in the light of the development of a relevant framework for social entrepreneurship competence, having significant implications for educational practice in social entrepreneurship education.

Originality/value

With this paper, the authors fulfill the need of a framework of social entrepreneurship competences that serves as a foundation for educational practice and further research in the context of service learning and beyond.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Isabel Quintillán and Iñaki Peña-Legazkue

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors related to entrepreneurs’ emotional intelligence that trigger the choice of venture internationalization after locally…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors related to entrepreneurs’ emotional intelligence that trigger the choice of venture internationalization after locally suffering the shock of an economic recession in a developing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The primary survey data were collected from 226 Uruguayan entrepreneurs and included their psychological traits and human capital characteristics after the most recent global financial crash of 2008. Personal interviews were conducted, and a “Trait Meta-Mood Scale” instrument (i.e. TMMS-12) was specifically designed for the measurement of emotional intelligence. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

This study demonstrates that in disadvantaged environments, such as developing regions suffering from a severe global crisis, the early internationalization process of a new firm is mainly triggered by entrepreneurs’ emotional intelligence attributes rather than conventional human capital-related attributes. Moreover, social–emotional competences are more significant than personal–emotional competences to explain entrepreneurs’ exporting behaviour in such an adverse context.

Originality/value

The effect of emotional intelligence on venture internationalization is investigated in situations in which entrepreneurs are pressured to pursue risk-bearing strategies, pushed by a disrupting shock that weakens the national economic condition (e.g. an economic recession). While previous findings have highlighted the importance of entrepreneurs’ human capital attributes in their entering foreign markets, few studies have analysed how the emotional intelligence competences of entrepreneurs lead them to internationalize. This study fills this gap in the literature on entrepreneurial behaviour by focussing on the emotional, cognitive and psychological qualities of entrepreneurs to explain their exporting business decisions.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2007

Daniel Belet

The author's interest in learning organisation development leads him to examine large French companies' practices regarding “high potential” executives policies and to…

1896

Abstract

Purpose

The author's interest in learning organisation development leads him to examine large French companies' practices regarding “high potential” executives policies and to question their selection and development processes and their capabilities to develop learning oriented organisations.The author also tries to explain why most large French companies are not yet familiar with this concept.

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis of the managerial and leadership characteristics of the French élite, as well as of the way they are trained in French grandes écoles and universities, can help to understand the kind of dominant style of leadership that features in the so called “high potential” executives in most large French companies.

Findings

The criteria against which these French “high potential” executives are discriminated explains largely their still very traditional hierarchical and centralised leadership styles, that are not favourable to build the more learning oriented organisations of the future. In addition most of the management development programmes for these executives stem from the traditional hierarchical leadership models that do not foster the necessary changes.

Research limitations/implications

This article is based on the results of several studies performed in France by organisational sociologists about the corporate élite and the “high potential” executives of large companies and their development policies. The author relies on his participation in field researches but also draws from his extensive professional experience and in‐depth knowledge of these large organisations as consultant, trainer and speaker.

Originality/value

This article provides a critical approach of the mainstream “high potential” model based on the learning organisation philosophy. It proposes another vision of the “high potential” executive concept that the author believes to be more adequate in facing up to the challenge of the HR management and leadership changes that most large French organisations will likely have to face in the future. It also raises the issue of the adequacy of the present leadership development offer of the higher management education system. Although slightly political it aims at generating a debate about the very concept of the “high potential” executive, which is a major key to the necessary changes in the people management and leadership practices for the organisations of the future.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

Stanley Lees

What should the behavioural science aspect of a six week, middle management nursing course be attempting to achieve? How should the behavioural aspect be integrated into…

Abstract

What should the behavioural science aspect of a six week, middle management nursing course be attempting to achieve? How should the behavioural aspect be integrated into the total course structure? What happens when the first week of a course is given over to a study of OD activities? What are the implications of this?

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1971

Gerald Randell

Just what is the task of a “General Manager” in an organization large enough to support specialists responsible for the various functions of finance, production…

Abstract

Just what is the task of a “General Manager” in an organization large enough to support specialists responsible for the various functions of finance, production, personnel, markets etc? The text‐books appear to say “co‐ordinate” and imply that training for general management should consist of knowing enough about the functions to control them. The business schools are extending this concept to include “policy making” and more recently “corporate planning and strategy”. Many organizations are now setting up Corporate Planning Departments, reporting to the General Manager so creating another function, to be co‐ordinated and controlled. When observed, or asked, a General Manager seems to spend a great deal of his time interacting with people. Although he may employ a Personnel Manager to be responsible for the staffing practices and policies, it is more often the case that the General Manager is seen as the overall “boss” of all the men and women in an organization, and he, not the Personnel Manager is usually regarded as the ultimate “father figure”. In this role all the inter‐personal and social activities of the organization appear to stem from him, he seems to set the “human tone” of the organization, whether he accepts the responsibility or not. So the function of the General Manager appears to be concerned with two extremes. On one side is the task of “organization management” in its broadest sense, not only co‐ordination of the moment but planning over a long time span. On the other is the highly detailed task of interpersonal relationships or man‐management. There is abounding evidence that many good management ideas and proposals get thwarted in their introduction by inept explanation or persuasion of colleagues or staff. Many General Managers get criticized just because they do not walk around and talk enough with their staff. Good plans are continually going astray due to bad communications, poor interpersonal relations and inadequate co‐operation.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Malcolm Higgs

Explores the development of thinking on leadership and places it in the context of the dominant discourses of the period in which studies were conducted. Argues that if a…

20480

Abstract

Explores the development of thinking on leadership and places it in the context of the dominant discourses of the period in which studies were conducted. Argues that if a “sense making” paradigm is adopted. it becomes feasible to identify a model of leadership, which is relevant to the context of complexity and change facing organisations in the early twenty‐first century. The model emerges when the measure of effectiveness is changed from organisational success to the impact of the leader on followers and on building of capability. The argument for such a shift is underpinned by the movement of dominant organisational logic from a Weberian rational/analytical one to a logic which acknowledges emotional considerations. Within the leadership arena it has been proposed that emotional intelligence is a major factor underpinning success. Presents data from recent research, which empirically demonstrates linkages between emotional intelligence and leadership. These findings are examined in conjunction with the “Emergent model”.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Mike Zapp

This article put forward two claims. First, it argues that, historically, the rationale for education has shifted from religious and national indoctrination to, in the…

Abstract

This article put forward two claims. First, it argues that, historically, the rationale for education has shifted from religious and national indoctrination to, in the more recent neoliberal period, human capital and the related notion of individual empowerment. Second, the article argues that the recent shift toward individual empowerment is reflected in international organizations’ (IOs) changing emphases in education. IOs’ educational agenda has undergone various changes since their early work in the 1960s: From the structural expansion of national education systems to the measurement of individual educational achievement through a focus on competencies and, most recently, individual psychosocial development.

Based on a content analysis of 60 documents from 38 IOs involved in international education networks between 1990 and 2015, this work identified an expanding field of IOs directing attention to the mental capabilities of a learner. The proliferated model of an individual actorhood reflected in these novel assessment designs will be presented and embedded in wider discussions about the cultural construction of the individual in contemporary world polity.

Details

Cross-nationally Comparative, Evidence-based Educational Policymaking and Reform
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-767-8

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

1 – 10 of 894