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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Randy K. Chiu, Janet S.W. Man and Jerome Thayer

Numerous studies have been conducted to test the causal relationship among role conflict, role satisfaction and stress. However, they are mostly done in the USA. Given…

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2446

Abstract

Numerous studies have been conducted to test the causal relationship among role conflict, role satisfaction and stress. However, they are mostly done in the USA. Given that Chinese culture is different from American culture, models developed in the West may not apply to the Chinese population. This study, therefore, examined the causal relationship among work conflict, family conflict, job satisfaction, marital satisfaction, life satisfaction and stress. Subjects of this study included nurses, social workers, and managers in Hong Kong. Path analysis was conducted and its result showed a good fit of the model. The findings indicate that job satisfaction and marital satisfaction experienced by the subjects were affected by work conflict and family conflict as well as inter‐role conflict. Likewise, their stress level was also influenced by life satisfaction which in turn was affected by job satisfaction and marital satisfaction.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 13 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2014

Shannon L. Rawski, Emilija Djurdjevic and Leah D. Sheppard

Findings regarding the relationship between biological sex and job stress remain inconsistent. In the present chapter, we suggest that this is due to the overly simplistic…

Abstract

Findings regarding the relationship between biological sex and job stress remain inconsistent. In the present chapter, we suggest that this is due to the overly simplistic and synonymous treatment of biological sex and gender. Specifically, researchers have operationalized gender as sex, neglecting the inherent complexity of the gender construct. To address this, we take a more nuanced approach and develop a theory around the effects of biological sex and gender on job stress, considering how sex, gender, sex-based prescribed gender roles and work roles interact to create role conflict. We predict that a lack of congruence between any of the aforementioned variables results in various types of role conflict, leading to stress, and requiring coping. Drawing on the literature on role conflict, emotional labor, and facades of conformity, we introduce the concept of gender façades as a coping mechanism. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

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The Role of Demographics in Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-646-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Victor M. Catano, Morgan Pond and E. Kevin Kelloway

Volunteer organizations, where there is no employment relationship between the member and the organization, represent an interesting context in which to explore the…

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5622

Abstract

Volunteer organizations, where there is no employment relationship between the member and the organization, represent an interesting context in which to explore the effects of leadership and organizational commitment. We present the results from a study of 212 Canadian volunteer leaders from an international social/charitable organization. Volunteer leaders were more psychologically involved and committed to their organization than comparable leaders from a trade union. The volunteer leaders rated higher than their union counterparts in transformational leadership and socialization. Union leaders were more transactional and held stronger Marxist work beliefs. Both volunteer and union leaders reported similar humanistic views on work. There were no differences with respect to inter‐role conflict that both types of leaders experienced. Discussion of the results focuses on application of these findings to changing organizational environments and their interaction of work and non‐work issues.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Margaret Posig and Jill Kickul

A model integrating work‐role expectations of employees, work‐family conflict, family‐work conflict, and a component of burnout was proposed and empirically tested on 163…

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6920

Abstract

A model integrating work‐role expectations of employees, work‐family conflict, family‐work conflict, and a component of burnout was proposed and empirically tested on 163 employees, who were also part of dual‐earner couples. Gender differences were found in the proposed model. For males, work‐family conflict mediated the relationship between work‐role expectations and emotional exhaustion. Although the same indirect relationship was found for females, a direct relationship also existed between work‐role expectations and emotional exhaustion. Additionally, for females, family‐work conflict was found to be a key contributor to work‐family conflict and emotional exhaustion. Managerial implications and future research directions are discussed.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Victor P. Lau, Yin Yee Wong and Cheris W.C. Chow

Drawing on proactive coping theory, the authors aimed to test the mitigating effects of proactive personality on the relationships between work-to-family conflict and both…

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1087

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on proactive coping theory, the authors aimed to test the mitigating effects of proactive personality on the relationships between work-to-family conflict and both work-related outcomes (i.e. career satisfaction and social network) and nonwork-related outcomes (i.e. life satisfaction and personal growth).

Design/methodology/approach

To increase the heterogeneity of sample, undergraduate students in a private university were randomly invited and then requested to invite any one of their parents, who had a full time job currently, to participate in the study. Sample size was 204, with a response rate of 75.56 percent.

Findings

As predicted, results showed that, for those who had a high level of proactive personality, the influences of work-to-family conflict on both work- and nonwork-related outcomes were all significantly mitigated, as compared with those who had a low level of proactive personality.

Originality/value

In this paper, the authors initiated a new insight into work-family interface research by advocating that individuals may “transfer” or reallocate their resources across the work and family domains. They labeled this phenomenon as work-family reallocation, which was supposedly to be differentiated from the prevailing concepts of either work-family conflict or work-family facilitation.

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Career Development International, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Zaini Ahmad and Dennis Taylor

Taking a cognitive perspective of internal auditor independence, the purpose of this study is to develop measures for the concepts of commitment to independence, role…

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7610

Abstract

Purpose

Taking a cognitive perspective of internal auditor independence, the purpose of this study is to develop measures for the concepts of commitment to independence, role conflict and role ambiguity in the context of the internal auditor's work environment, in order to provide evidence of the effects of role conflict and ambiguity, and their sub‐dimensions, on the internal auditor's commitment to independence.

Design/methodology/approach

To measure these concepts, scales are developed for a questionnaire by drawing on measures established in the organizational behavior literature and adapting these to the internal auditor's context. The questionnaire is sent to a sample of internal auditors drawn from the database of the Institute of Internal Auditors Malaysia in which listed companies with an in‐house internal audit function are extracted. There are 101 useable responses.

Findings

The results reveal that both role ambiguity and role conflict are significantly negatively related to commitment to independence. The underlying dimensions found to have the greatest impact on commitment to independence are: first, ambiguity in both the exercise of authority by the internal auditor and time pressure faced by the internal auditor; and second, conflict between the internal auditor's personal values and both management's and their profession's expectations and requirements.

Originality/value

The results extend the literature on internal auditor independence and provide insights for auditing standards setters and corporate governance designers.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 24 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Abstract

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Executive Burnout
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-285-9

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Radha R. Sharma and Sir Cary Cooper

Abstract

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Executive Burnout
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-285-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Mohsin Aziz

Organisational stress originates in organisational demands that are experienced by the individual. Stress is built up in the concept of role which is conceived as the…

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3943

Abstract

Organisational stress originates in organisational demands that are experienced by the individual. Stress is built up in the concept of role which is conceived as the position a person occupies in a system. This paper investigates the intensity of organisational role stress among women informational technology professionals in the Indian private sector. Organisational role stress scale is used on a sample of 264 to explore the level of role stress. Resource inadequacy has emerged as the most potent role stressor, followed by role overload and personal inadequacy. The research finds differences in the level of stress between married and unmarried employees on several role stressors. However, level of education does not emerge as a significant differentiator of stressors.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

Md. Shamsul Arefin, Md. Shariful Alam, Nazrul Islam and Mateusz Molasy

Researchers have shown increasing interest, in recent times, in organizational politics and how it affects employees and organizations. This paper aims to investigate how…

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers have shown increasing interest, in recent times, in organizational politics and how it affects employees and organizations. This paper aims to investigate how perceived organizational politics (POPS) impact employee behaviors such as task performance, organizational citizenship and turnover intention, by affecting work-family conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 287 full-time frontline hotel employees in Bangladesh was collected. A hierarchical regression analysis was applied to test the hypotheses. Data were analyzed using SPSS and AMOS software.

Findings

The results show that work–family conflict plays a mediating role in the indirect effect of POPS on task performance, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and turnover intention. The findings of the study also suggest that POPS has a positive association with work–family conflict and turnover intention, and negative association with task performance and OCB.

Research limitations/implications

This study cannot confirm causal inference, which can be the scope for future studies.

Practical implications

Managers may design the work environment in ways that ensure work and family interface and employee retention. Training programs can help employees deal with organizational politics and potential impact on work and nonwork problems. Managers should provide employees with the necessary support to sustain in-role and extra-role behavior in the political environment.

Originality/value

To the best of our knowledge, no prior studies have been carried out with this scope in the South Asian context.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

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