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Article

Chris Miller and Yusuf Ahmad

Posits that collaboration in the UK is either recommended as good practice or enshrined within legislation as a necessity. Chronicles that there has been a sustained…

Abstract

Posits that collaboration in the UK is either recommended as good practice or enshrined within legislation as a necessity. Chronicles that there has been a sustained growth in the number of formal and informal collaborative relationships between state agencies and market, voluntary and community sectors, as well as within and between state agencies themselves. Uses illustrative case study materials drawn from the authors’ research and consultancy experiences, particularly in the areas of inner city community based mental health, urban regeneration, policing, and child and adolescent mental health. Concludes that research has extensively been drawn on to illustrate the dilemmas that regularly arise when attempting to implement this policy objective.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 20 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article

Adrian Barton

The effects of the use and mis‐use of illicit substances on individuals and society continues to be of paramount importance to policy makers from all sectors. As a result…

Abstract

The effects of the use and mis‐use of illicit substances on individuals and society continues to be of paramount importance to policy makers from all sectors. As a result, central government is busy promoting a number of initiatives, all aimed at addressing this contemporary problem. Whilst each policy move will be different, they share a common feature, the imperative of “joined‐up” working. This paper provides the results of a research project that examined the genesis and development of a health education project which involved agencies from the voluntary sector, health, social services, education and the police. The paper details the process and mechanics of planning and delivering this type of multi‐disciplinary project. The evaluation of the project showed that on the whole the professionals worked well together. Inter‐agency working was facilitated by the extent to which the professionals involved shared the same discourse and ideology and were thus able to overcome the usual pitfalls of joint working. Where the professions did not share a discourse and ideology, problems of roles and responsibilities emerged: specifically, there was a clash between the “law enforcement” model of the police and “harm reduction” model of the health and social care agencies, which led to some difficulties in working together.

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Health Education, vol. 101 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

David Reid, Bridget Penhale, Jill Manthorpe, Neil Perkins, Lisa Pinkney and Shereen Hussein

Little is known about the relationship between organisations charged with the protection of vulnerable adults in England and Wales. This paper investigates adult…

Abstract

Little is known about the relationship between organisations charged with the protection of vulnerable adults in England and Wales. This paper investigates adult protection1 inter‐agency relationships in the context of an adult protection framework that gave local authorities the lead role and charged other agencies with working in partnership with them. The data reported are from focus groups undertaken with members of 26 Adult Protection Committees (APCs) from England and Wales during 2005‐2006. The APCs were selected using a stratified sampling frame and 271 professionals participated. Analysis revealed that participation in the local strategic decision‐making setting of the APC was influenced by the local history of partnership working, information‐sharing, affective relationships, understanding of respective roles and a shared acknowledgement of the importance of adult protection. The implications of these findings are discussed in the light of government reviews of local discretion around adult protection systems.

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article

Paul Cambridge and Tessa Parkes

This paper argues for a case management rationale in adult protection management and practice, drawing insights from a series of linked training initiatives and an…

Abstract

This paper argues for a case management rationale in adult protection management and practice, drawing insights from a series of linked training initiatives and an evaluation of the role of the specialist adult protection co‐ordinator. An explicit case managed approach contrasts with much current practice for adult protection, where responsibilities often vary widely within, between and across agencies and professional and worker roles.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article

David Palmer, Sarah Pittaway, Lindsey Cook, Sandra Garner, Sue Holtum, Jackie Sansom and Charu Bassi

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of guided self‐help cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for mothers with depression and/or anxiety undertaken in two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of guided self‐help cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for mothers with depression and/or anxiety undertaken in two Sure Start children's centres in the London Borough of Bexley.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study was carried out involving 23 participants who attended an initial appointment with a Psychological Well‐being Practitioner and who were assessed and allocated to a guided self‐help CBT intervention (either workbooks or computer‐based). In addition, in‐depth interviews were undertaken with nine participants who had completed the programme.

Findings

The study finds that guided self‐help CBT produced a significant clinical benefit for participants with mild to moderate depression and/or anxiety. Narratives with participants also highlighted improved confidence and self‐esteem, positive thinking and better coping strategies, which may have a positive impact on their children and families. This research also demonstrated the importance of a partnership approach to providing therapeutic interventions for vulnerable groups such as those in this study.

Originality/value

The findings represent a “snap‐shot” of the positive effects of guided self‐help CBT for those suffering maternal depression. They demonstrate the need to recognise and support the therapeutic social milieu, particularly in settings that are familiar and accessible. In addition, psychological interventions that include facilitative holistic working and inter‐agency working can be particularly effective.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article

Kate Bell, Tony Kinder and Guro Huby

Rhetoric and reality lead separate lives when it comes to integrating health and social services in Scotland, and it is making planning and implementation difficult for…

Abstract

Rhetoric and reality lead separate lives when it comes to integrating health and social services in Scotland, and it is making planning and implementation difficult for practitioners of integration. This paper is a collaboration between a practitioner and two academics who teach, research and write about integration. It explores the views of other integration practitioners about the policy, language and nature of integration, and the issues practitioners are currently grappling with, especially how the policy language of ‘integration’ fails to connect with integration in practice. It appears that ‘integration’ has less to do with broad policy aspirations and principles of service (re)organisation, than with the specific aims, objectives and outcomes of individual projects delivered in very specific circumstances. Acknowledging the localisation of integration, and allowing the time for productive problem solving which can generate a new language, ought to be essential elements of integration.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article

David Carpenter

Describes a pilot project conducted in Coventry on peer education and alcohol within schools and youth clubs. Looks at the rationale behind the project, the project work

Abstract

Describes a pilot project conducted in Coventry on peer education and alcohol within schools and youth clubs. Looks at the rationale behind the project, the project work and some of the issues raised. Describes the future of the project as it expands into welfare and support services for young people affected by alcohol. Gives details of a best practice resource.

Details

Health Education, vol. 96 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Abstract

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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