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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Sik Sumaedi, I. Gede Mahatma Yuda Bakti, Tri Rakhmawati, Tri Widianti, Nidya J. Astrini, Sih Damayanti, M. Azwar Massijaya and Rahmi K. Jati

This research seeks to simultaneously test the effect of attitude towards the behavior of following the “Stay at Home” policy, subjective norm, perceived behavioral…

Abstract

Purpose

This research seeks to simultaneously test the effect of attitude towards the behavior of following the “Stay at Home” policy, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, perceived susceptibility and perceived severity on people's intention to follow the “Stay at Home” policy during COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through an online survey with 148 respondents in the Greater Area of Jakarta, Indonesia. The data were then analyzed using multiple regressions.

Findings

The findings show that attitude towards the behavior, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control positively and significantly affect intention to follow “Stay at Home” during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, perceived susceptibility and perceived severity of COVID-19 do not significantly influence the intention to follow “Stay at Home” during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to the Greater Area of Jakarta, Indonesia. Furthermore, sampling was done through convenience sampling. Therefore, future research should be conducted in a different context to test the generalization of this research's findings.

Practical implications

To encourage citizens' adherence to the stay-at-home policy during the COVID-19 pandemic, they must be directed to have positive attitudes toward the policy. Financial and non-financial supports are critical to ensure citizens' ability to sufficiently observe the policy sufficiently. Another important aspect is the influence of leaders and public figures to consistently call for obedience consistently.

Originality/value

This is the first research that studies citizens' behavior related to the “Stay at Home” policy requisitioned by the government to hinder the spread of COVID-19.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2021

Bahadur Ali Soomro and Naimatullah Shah

At present, almost the whole globe is facing a severe threat of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The present study examines the intention to stay home due to COVID-19…

Abstract

Purpose

At present, almost the whole globe is facing a severe threat of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The present study examines the intention to stay home due to COVID-19 during a second wave of the pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a deductive approach based on cross-sectional data. An online survey is conducted from citizens of Pakistan. A convenience sampling is applied to target the respondents. In total, 238 useable responses proceed for final analysis. The structural equation model (SEM) is used to infer the results.

Findings

The findings of the study highlight a positive and significant effect of fear of COVID-19, attitudes to stay at home behaviour (AtSHB), knowledge about COVID-19 (Ka19) and health consciousness (HC) on the intention to stay at home (ItSAH).

Practical implications

The study would provide the guidelines to policymakers and planners to develop the policies which may establish the individual's ItSAH. This strategy would restrict the spread of COVID-19. The government should also formulate the plannings to reduce the fear about COVID-19 and health concerns to combat the pandemic. The government should launch awareness programs regarding the spread and cure of COVID-19.

Originality/value

This study is the first study which highlights the factors such as fear, HC, attitudes and knowledge towards ItSAH. The study may be unique in the COVID-19 perspective, particularly in the Pakistani context.

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2021

Fernanda Mata, Pedro S.R. Martins, Julia B. Lopes-Silva, Marcela Mansur-Alves, Alexander Saeri, Emily Grundy, Peter Slattery and Liam Smith

This study aimed to examine (1) whether confidence in political and health authorities predicted intention to adopt recommended health-protective behaviours and (2…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to examine (1) whether confidence in political and health authorities predicted intention to adopt recommended health-protective behaviours and (2) whether age, gender and education level moderated the relationship between confidence in political and health authorities and health protective-behaviours (download the COVIDSafe app, wear a face mask and stay at home).

Design/methodology/approach

This study assessed 1,206 Australians using an online survey. Participants answered questions regarding their confidence in political and health authorities and intention to adopt health-protective measures.

Findings

Confidence in health and political authorities predicted intention to stay home and intention to download the COVIDSafe app, but not to wear a face mask in public spaces. Age moderated the relationship between confidence in authorities and intention to stay home (i.e. among respondents with less than 54 years old, confidence in authorities was associated with higher intention to stay home). Further, age and education level moderated the relationship between confidence in authorities and intention to download the COVIDSafe app (i.e. among older respondents and those with a university degree or higher, confidence in authorities was more strongly associated with higher intention to download the COVIDSafe app). The interaction between confidence and education predicted adoption of mask-wearing (i.e. among participants with a university degree or higher, more confidence in authorities was associated with higher intention to wear a mask in public spaces).

Originality/value

Our findings can inform the development of targeted communications to increase health-protective behaviours at early stages of future pandemics.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 41 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

5660

Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Karen L. Xie, Linchi Kwok and Jiang Wu

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of host attributes and travelers’ frequency of past stays and their interaction on the likelihood of repeat purchase of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of host attributes and travelers’ frequency of past stays and their interaction on the likelihood of repeat purchase of home-sharing services at both the host and listing levels.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of econometrics analyses using a large-scale, granular online observational data set collected from a home-sharing platform was performed.

Findings

Travelers exhibit salient loyalty to home-sharing services. At the host level, host attributes including acceptance rate and listing capacity positively affect travelers’ likelihood of repeat purchase; such effects diminish as travelers’ frequency of past stays with a host/listing increases. At the listing level, confirmation efficiency and acceptance rate are critical, and travelers’ frequency of past stays matters.

Research limitations/implications

Responding to the call for more research on customer loyalty of sharing economy, this study instantiated on a home-sharing website in China and adds a unique perspective to the research domain, but its findings may not be generalized in other settings.

Practical implications

This study identifies the factors affecting customers’ repeat purchase behaviors at both the host and listing levels, allowing the hosts, webmasters of home-sharing websites and even hoteliers to advance specific tactics to promote repeat purchase among travelers.

Originality/value

Loyalty was measured with real-time internet-enabled observational data about travelers’ actual repeat purchase behavior on a home-sharing website, rather than assessing consumers’ behavioral intentions through the conventional survey method. Two specific levels of customer loyalty were analyzed, including the ones towards a service provider (host) and a service product (listing).

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 December 2019

Bernadeta Goštautaitė, Ilona Bučiūnienė, Wolfgang Mayrhofer, Karolis Bareikis and Eglė Bertašiūtė

The purpose of this paper is to explain why entry-level job applicants intend to leave their home country to work abroad by adopting the framework of country embeddedness…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain why entry-level job applicants intend to leave their home country to work abroad by adopting the framework of country embeddedness (i.e. career and community embeddedness).

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses are tested using survey data of a sample of prospective healthcare entry-level job applicants (i.e. last year medical students) using hierarchical regression analyses and bootstrapping procedures.

Findings

Results show that, first, home country career and community embeddedness are negatively associated with self-initiated expatriation intention (SIE-intention). Second, developmental feedback reduces SIE-intention. This relationship is at least partly due to increased home country career embeddedness. Third, national identity reduces SIE-intention. The relationship is at least partly due to increased home country community embeddedness.

Originality/value

This paper advances the understanding of SIE by focusing on home country factors associated with the decision to work abroad, whereas the majority of current research mainly considers host country variables.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2021

Juan Miguel Rosa González, Michelle Barker and Dhara Shah

Given that the incidence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) varies greatly between countries, it becomes relevant to explore self-initiated expatriate (SIE) health…

Abstract

Purpose

Given that the incidence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) varies greatly between countries, it becomes relevant to explore self-initiated expatriate (SIE) health workers' perceptions of home vs host country safety during a global pandemic. Thus, the paper aims to study the effects of COVID-19 on the expatriation experience of Spanish SIE nurses in Germany, focussing on perceptions of home and host country safety as push/pull forces on their intentions to repatriate or stay.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews (n = 10) were conducted with Spanish SIE nurses in Germany between April/June 2020 followed by instant messaging interactions with the same participants in October/November 2020. Data analysis was assisted by NVivo software.

Findings

Overloaded by information from social networks about the impact of COVID-19 in Spain compared with the situation in Germany, Spanish SIE nurses had exacerbated feelings of stress, and some reported having experienced guilt for not being in their home country. Nevertheless, the contrasting impact and management of the crisis and its relative effect on health workers and the larger society in Spain and Germany reinforced the nurses' intention to stay in Germany.

Research limitations/implications

The research offers insights to organisations and public authorities involved with providing support to SIEs during crises, highlighting the implications of SIEs' social networks and dual allegiance to home and host countries during a global health emergency.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the growing literature on SIEs, whilst adding to the research on expatriates' well-being and safety during crises.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Farveh Farivar, Jane Coffey and Roslyn Cameron

The purpose of this paper is to investigate which sociocultural and work conditions have the potential to change international graduates’ career mobility intentions and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate which sociocultural and work conditions have the potential to change international graduates’ career mobility intentions and encourage international graduates to stay in the host country when the initial intention was to leave the host country after graduating.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via a web-based survey from international graduates and analyses suggest 129 (20 percent) of respondents changed their initial career mobility intentions. Data were analyzed using fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis.

Findings

Although previous studies report some pull–push factors such as attractive payment rates and work experience as being important in attracting potential workforce participants, these factors have no influence on changing the career mobility intentions of international graduates. In contrast, the work environment (WE) seems to be a strong condition for changing career mobility decisions. Results also reveal that the influence of sociocultural conditions on initial career mobility intention is more complicated than work conditions and varies from case to case.

Practical implications

The present study adopts the theoretical assumption that migration and mobility is a transition that forms over time and the findings suggest that international graduates’ global career mobility intentions depend on the WE. Therefore, government, higher education and industry development policy makers need to take this factor into account if they are interested in attracting and retaining global talent.

Originality/value

The majority of previous studies have focused on which push–pull factors encourage the recently graduated international student workforce to move or stay in a country while the current study argues which conditions have the potential to change initial career mobility intentions.

Article
Publication date: 12 May 2020

Arawati Agus and Rajni Selvaraj

The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between quality of work life (QWL), employee commitment and the intention to stay of nurses in private hospitals…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between quality of work life (QWL), employee commitment and the intention to stay of nurses in private hospitals in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey design was used in this study. Primary data were collected through self-administered questionnaires with nurses as the respondents from four private hospitals in the states of Selangor and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Out of 300 questionnaires distributed, 202 valid responses were received. Statistical analyses employed were descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

The strongest QWL construct that contributed significantly to the intention to stay among respondents is work context, followed by work world, work design and work life/home life. The findings further indicate that employee commitment partially mediates the relationship between QWL and the intention to stay. In conclusion, if employees are contented with their QWL, the stronger will the employee commitment be in the organization and ultimately their intention to stay.

Originality/value

This study provides robust evidence for private hospital administrators to enhance their employees' QWL, especially if they are opting to ensure that the turnover of the staff is contained.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

Nil Demet Güngör and Aysıt Tansel

The paper aims to present research findings on the return intentions of Turkish professionals residing abroad, where the targeted group comprises individuals working at a…

2337

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to present research findings on the return intentions of Turkish professionals residing abroad, where the targeted group comprises individuals working at a full‐time job abroad who possess at least a tertiary level degree.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a descriptive framework to establish the validity of several proposed models of non‐return. The results are based on an internet survey of Turkish professionals conducted by the authors during the first half of 2002. A combination of internet search and referral sampling methods is used to collect the data. Correspondence analysis is used to examine the relationship between return intentions and various factors that may affect this intention.

Findings

The results emphasize the importance of student non‐return versus traditional brain and appear to complement the various theories of student non‐return. Many Turkish professionals working abroad are non‐returning post‐graduate students rather than holders of higher degrees obtained in Turkey who subsequently moved. The respondents appear to come from relatively well‐to‐do families with highly educated parents. Many have earned their degrees from universities that have foreign language instruction. The recent economic crises in Turkey have negatively affected return intentions. It is verified that return intentions are indeed linked closely with initial return plans, and that this relationship weakens with stay duration. Specialized study and work experience in the host country also all appear to contribute to explaining the incidence of non‐return. Return intentions are weaker for those working in an academic environment.

Originality/value

The study is the first of its kind for Turkey and other developing countries in terms of the number of responses received and the kind of information collected. Implications are valuable for Turkish and other developing country planners.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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