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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Mohd Anwar Zawawi, Sinead O'Keffe and Elfed Lewis

The purpose of this paper is to provide a comparative review of intensity‐modulated fiber optic sensors with non‐optical sensors for health monitoring applications, from…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a comparative review of intensity‐modulated fiber optic sensors with non‐optical sensors for health monitoring applications, from the current research activities in the area.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of published research work in sensor design for four different health monitoring applications, including, lumbar spine bending, upper and lower limb motion tracking, respiration and heart rate monitoring, are presented and discussed in terms of their respective advantages and limitations.

Findings

This paper provides information on the various types of sensors applied into the health monitoring area. The sensing techniques of the fiber optic sensor for the stated applications are focused and compared in details to highlight their contributions.

Originality/value

A comparative review of published work is illustrated in an informative table content, to allow a clear idea of the current sensing approaches for health monitoring applications.

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2021

Adel Abdallah, Mohamed M. Fouad and Hesham N. Ahmed

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a novel intensity-modulated fiber optic sensor for real-time intrusion detection using a fiber-optic microbend sensor and an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a novel intensity-modulated fiber optic sensor for real-time intrusion detection using a fiber-optic microbend sensor and an optical time-domain reflectometer (OTDR).

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed system is tested using different scenarios using person/car as intruders. Experiments are conducted in the lab and in the field. In the beginning, the OTDR trace is obtained and recorded as a reference signal without intrusion events. The second step is to capture the OTDR trace with intrusion events in one or multiple sectors. This measured signal is then compared to the reference signal and processed by matrix laboratory to determine the intruded sector. Information of the intrusion is displayed on an interactive screen implemented by Visual basic. The deformer is designed and implemented using SOLIDWORKS three-dimensional computer aided design Software.

Findings

The system is tested for intrusions by performing two experiments. The first experiment is performed for both persons (>50 kg) in the lab and cars in an open field with a car moving at 60 km/h using two optical fiber sectors of lengths 200 and 500 m. For test purposes, the deformer length used in the experiment is 2 m. The used signal processing technique in the first experiment has some limitations and its accuracy is 70% after measuring and recording 100 observations. To overcome these limitations, a second experiment with another technique of signal processing is performed.

Research limitations/implications

The system can perfectly display consecutive intrusions of the sectors, but in case of simultaneous intrusions of different sectors, which is difficult to take place in real situations, there will be the ambiguity of the number of intruders and the intruded sector. This will be addressed in future work. Suitable and stable laser power is required to get a suitable level of backscattered power. Optimization of the deformer is required to enhance the sensitivity and reliability of the sensor.

Practical implications

The proposed work enables us to benefit from the ease of implementation and the reduced cost of the intensity-modulated fiber optic sensors because it overcomes the constraints that prevent using the intensity-modulated fiber optic sensors for intrusion detection.

Originality/value

The proposed system is the first time long-range intensity-modulated fiber optic sensor for intrusion detection.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Elzbieta Marszalec and Janusz Marszalec

Integration of lasers and fibre optics into robotic systems provides new opportunities in sensing and material processing. Increased productivity and application of robots…

Abstract

Integration of lasers and fibre optics into robotic systems provides new opportunities in sensing and material processing. Increased productivity and application of robots in hostile environments are other possibilities.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

M. Yasin, H.A. Rahman, N. Bidin, S.W. Harun and H. Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a simple design of a fiber optic displacement sensor using a multimode plastic fiber coupler based on reflective intensity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a simple design of a fiber optic displacement sensor using a multimode plastic fiber coupler based on reflective intensity modulation technique.

Design/methodology/approach

The performances of this sensor are investigated by correlating the detector output with different light sources, coupling ratios and various real objects with different reflectivity properties namely aluminum, brass and copper. In contrast to the output profile produced by probes with multiple fibers placed adjacently together, this sensor uses only one fiber for sending and receiving the light and therefore only the back slope exists.

Findings

Aluminum exhibit the highest performance among the real objects when coupled with a red He‐Ne laser and a coupling ratio of 50:50 with a sensitivity, linear range, resolution and dynamic range of 1.7 mV/mm, 1.5 mm, 16 μm, and 5.0 mm, respectively.

Originality/value

This is the first demonstration of a fiber optic displacement sensor using fiber coupler probe with successful examination of the correlation between the detector output, variation in coupling ratios and reflectivity properties of the tested real objects.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Radislav Potyrailo and Sergei Golubkov

Achievements in guided wave optics have had a great influence on many areas of technology for several years. Fibre optic communication links, sensors for various…

Abstract

Achievements in guided wave optics have had a great influence on many areas of technology for several years. Fibre optic communication links, sensors for various parameters, recently developed distributed temperature sensors, integrated optical switches, etc. are all applications that are commercially available. The field of analytical chemistry is no exception in this growing technology. In order to compete with well‐established chemical‐sensing instrumentation, optical waveguide chemical sensors (OWCSs) must show all the qualities of such instrumentation. OWCSs combine well‐known features of sensors, based on waveguide optics, with optical methods of chemical analysis and offer advantages over other types of chemical sensor. OWCSs are electrically passive, corrosion‐resistant, can respond to analytes for which other chemical sensors are not available, and referencing can be carried out optically. They allow multicomponent measurements at several wavelengths, have a common technology for fabrication of sensors for different chemical and physical parameters and are easily compatible with telemetry etc. Further, only OWCSs are capable of distributed sensing. However, interference from ambient light, temperature, long‐term instability, relatively slow response time, and limited dynamic range may be a problem for some types of OWCS. These disadvantages can be considerably reduced using various methods.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2017

Shaoyi Xu, Fangfang Xing, Ruilin Wang, Wei Li, Yuqiao Wang and Xianghui Wang

At present, one of the key equipment in pillar industries is a large rotating machinery. Conducting regular health monitoring is important for ensuring safe operation of…

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Abstract

Purpose

At present, one of the key equipment in pillar industries is a large rotating machinery. Conducting regular health monitoring is important for ensuring safe operation of the large rotating machinery. Because vibrations sensors play an important role in the workings of the rotating machinery, measuring its vibration signal is an important task in health monitoring. This paper aims to present these.

Design/methodology/approach

In this work, the contact vibration sensor and the non-contact vibration sensor have been discussed. These sensors consist of two types: the electric vibration sensor and the optical fiber vibration sensor. Their applications in the large rotating machinery for the purpose of health monitoring are summarized, and their advantages and disadvantages are also presented.

Findings

Compared with the electric vibration sensor, the optical fiber vibration sensor of large rotating machinery has unique advantages in health monitoring, such as provision of immunity against electromagnetic interference, requirement of less insulation and provision of long-distance signal transmission.

Originality/value

Both contact vibration sensor and non-contact vibration sensor have been discussed. Among them, the electric vibration sensor and the optical fiber vibration sensor are compared. Future research direction of the vibration sensors is presented.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

GEC is engaged on sensing research at two of its five major longer‐range research centres — the Hirst Research Centre at Wembley and the Marconi Research Centre at Great…

Abstract

GEC is engaged on sensing research at two of its five major longer‐range research centres — the Hirst Research Centre at Wembley and the Marconi Research Centre at Great Baddow in Essex. Tony Walkden, Manager of the Engineering Science Division and George Pritchard, Administration Manager, at the Hirst Research Centre talked to Jack Hollingum about the sensing work in the Engineering Physics Group at Wembley and its place in the company's overall research policy.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Qian Yee Ang and Siew Chun Low

Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have aroused focus in medicinal chemistry in recent decades, especially for biomedical applications. Considering the exceptional…

Abstract

Purpose

Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have aroused focus in medicinal chemistry in recent decades, especially for biomedical applications. Considering the exceptional abilities to immobilize any guest of medical interest (antibodies, enzymes, etc.), MIPs is attractive to substantial research efforts in complementing the quest of biomimetic recognition systems. This study aims to review the key-concepts of molecular imprinting, particularly emphasizes on the conformational adaptability of MIPs beyond the usual description of molecular recognition. The optimal morphological integrity was also outlined in this review to acknowledge the successful sensing activities by MIPs.

Design/methodology/approach

This review highlighted the fundamental mechanisms and underlying challenges of MIPs from the preparation stage to sensor applications. The progress of electrochemical and optical sensing using molecularly imprinted assays has also been furnished, with the evolvement of molecular imprinting as a research hotspot.

Findings

The lack of standard synthesis protocol has brought about an intriguing open question in the selection of building blocks that are biocompatible to the imprint species of medical interest. Thus, in this paper, the shortcomings associated with the applications of MIPs in electrochemical and optical sensing were addressed using the existing literature besides pointing out possible solutions. Future perspectives in the vast development of MIPs also been postulated in this paper.

Originality/value

The present review intends to furnish the underlying mechanisms of MIPs in biomedical diagnostics, with the aim in electrochemical and optical sensing while hypothesizing on future possibilities.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1995

Oscar Oehler

Describes some of the current research into infrared spectroscopic gasdetection, outlining the need to produce a low cost device, whilst fulfillingthe required properties…

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216

Abstract

Describes some of the current research into infrared spectroscopic gas detection, outlining the need to produce a low cost device, whilst fulfilling the required properties of high reliability, selectivity and sensitivity. Describes and compares the photoacoustic and photothermal methods of gas detection and states that both methods outperform surface sensitive devices with respect to reliability. Concludes that the variety of options—a choice of acoustic decoupling methods and a choice of an optical filter of every wavelength required to suit the gas—offers a wide field of application including process control, atmospheric control, environmental monitoring and heat, ventilation and air conditioning.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

K.J. Burnham, O.C.L. Haas and D.J.G. James

By considering a number of practical case study examples, the paper highlights some of the design methods of intelligent systems for use in optimisation and control. The…

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1310

Abstract

By considering a number of practical case study examples, the paper highlights some of the design methods of intelligent systems for use in optimisation and control. The paper describes tools and approaches that are used as well as the systems to which they are applied. The approaches include fuzzy logic decision making for optimal start‐up of combined cycle power plant, control and modelling within an automotive air fuel ratio application and optimisation of intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment. These diverse application areas have much in common in regard to the problem‐solving approaches; in recognition of this, generic aspects of the use of intelligent methodologies are also highlighted.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 29 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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