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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Margaret Stout, Koen P. R. Bartels and Jeannine M. Love

Governance network managers are charged with triggering and sustaining collaborative dynamics, but often struggle to do so because they come from and interact with…

Abstract

Governance network managers are charged with triggering and sustaining collaborative dynamics, but often struggle to do so because they come from and interact with hierarchical and competitive organizations and systems. Thus, an important step toward effectively managing governance networks is to clarify collaborative dynamics. While the recently proposed collaborative governance regime (CGR) model provides a good start, it lacks both the conceptual clarity and parsimony needed in a useful analytical tool. This theoretical chapter uses the logic model framework to assess and reorganize the CGR model and then amends it using Follett’s theory of integrative process to provide a parsimonious understanding of collaborative dynamics, as opposed to authoritative coordination or negotiated cooperation. Uniquely, Follett draws from political and organizational theory practically grounded in the study of civic and business groups to frame the manner in which integrative process permeates collaboration. We argue that the disposition, style of relating, and mode of association in her integrative method foster collaborative dynamics while avoiding the counterproductive characteristics of hierarchy and competition. We develop an alternative logic model for studying collaborative dynamics that clarifies and defines these dynamics for future operationalization and empirical study.

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Changwei Pang, Qiong Wang, Yuan Li and Guang Duan

The purpose of this paper is to examine how business model innovation (BMI) mediates the relationship between integrative capability, business strategy and firm performance.

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1449

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how business model innovation (BMI) mediates the relationship between integrative capability, business strategy and firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review provides the model and hypotheses. Using a sample of 165 Chinese firms, the authors conduct the examination using a theoretical model and hypotheses following standard analysis methods.

Findings

The results show that BMI positively mediates the relationship between integrative capability and firm performance. Moreover, a differentiation strategy positively moderates the link between BMI and firm performance, while a cost leadership strategy presents a significantly negative moderating effect.

Research limitations/implications

First, the authors test the hypotheses using data from China; thus data from other emerging economies should be tested. Second, the authors use cross-sectional data in this study making it impossible to verify the dynamic developed in the process of BMI; a longitudinal study could provide a more comprehensive understanding. Third, the authors consider one intermediate mechanism to test the relationship of integrative capability and firm performance; additional factors may link integrative capability and firm performance.

Practical implications

The mediating effect of BMI suggests managers should pay more attention to BMI to improve firm performance, and they should understand that BMI’s role varies across different business strategies.

Originality/value

The paper is original in its investigation of the effect of integrative capability and BMI on firm performance using data from China and demonstrates the mediating effect of BMI on the relationship between integrative capability and firm performance.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Enrique Ogliastri, John Ickis and Ramiro Casó

The purpose of this study is to test the universality of the behavioral theory of negotiation developed in the United States, particularly the integrative/distributive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to test the universality of the behavioral theory of negotiation developed in the United States, particularly the integrative/distributive models, and to find negotiators' prototypes in international negotiations conducted in a Latin American country.

Design/methodology/approach

An open questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of 104 resident foreigners (expatriates) who reported the negotiation patterns of Costa Ricans. The qualitative data were coded in 52 variables (inte-rater reliability Fleiss' Kappa K= 0.65). A total of ten variables were selected to measure distributive/integrative patterns of negotiations. Latent class analysis (LCA) uncovered the latent structure of negotiations.

Findings

(1) The distributive (70% found in the sample) and integrative (30%) negotiation models hold in this culture. (2) The incorporation of handling emotions and interpersonal orientation in the integrative model seem to be an important theoretical and practical trend.

Research limitations/implications

(1) A larger sample size is needed to compare with data from other countries of the region and the world. (2) The use of emotions and interpersonal orientation in the integrative negotiation paradigm require further investigation. As practical implications, detailed negotiation advice is offered to Costa Ricans as well as to expatriates working there.

Originality/value

To identify negotiation patterns in an understudied region of the world, the distributive/integrative models of the behavioral theory of negotiations are a key focus with which to extend the literature. There are important elements of culture within the negotiation patterns, in line with trends of an evolving paradigm of integrative crosscultural negotiations.

Objetivos

Verificar la utilidad en un contexto latinoamericano de la teoría del comportamiento en las negociaciones, particularmente los modelos distributivo e integrativo. Identificar prototipos de negociadores latinoamericanos en un contexto intercultural.

Metodología

Se recogió una muestra de conveniencia mediante un cuestionario cualitativo a 104 extranjeros que viven y negocian en Costa Rica, quienes identificaron la manera como les negocian los locales. Estas encuestas fueron codificadas para tener una base de datos cuantitativa (coeficiente entre-evaluadores Fleiss de Kappa = 0.65) de 52 variables. Se escogieron 10 variables asociadas a los modelos integrativo y distributivo de negociación. Se realizó un Análisis de Clases Latentes en los datos (LCA en inglés) para descubrir la estructura latente de las negociaciones.

Resultados

(1) Los modelos de negociación distributivo (70% encontrado en la muestra) e integrativo (30%) tienen cabida en esta cultura. (2) El modelo integrativo de negociación está asociado al manejo de emociones y la orientación interpersonal, parte de una tendencia teórica y práctica en las negociaciones interculturales.

Limitaciones/Implicaciones

(1) Se requiere ampliar la muestra, y comparar con datos de otros países de la región y del mundo. (2) Orientar un estudio teórico sobre el manejo de emociones y la orientación interpersonal en el paradigma del modelo integrativo. Como implicaciones prácticas, se presentan consejos de negociación para los costarricenses, y también para los extranjeros que trabajan en el país.

Originalidad

Reconocer los patrones de negociación en una región poco estudiada. Los modelos distributivo e integrativo de la teoría del comportamiento en las negociaciones son una base para ampliar la literatura. Añadir el manejo de emociones y la orientación interpersonal al paradigmático modelo integrativo parece marcar una tendencia teórica y práctica de la negociación intercultural.

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Jennifer Riel and Roger Martin

The authors translate their the concept of integrative thinking into a repeatable methodology, supported by a set of tools for thinking through difficult or “wicked…

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1913

Abstract

Purpose

The authors translate their the concept of integrative thinking into a repeatable methodology, supported by a set of tools for thinking through difficult or “wicked“ problems, a process that offers a better chance of rejecting false choices and of finding a way through to an innovative alternative.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors divide their process into four phases. A case example illustrates each phase.

Findings

The four phases that make up the integrative thinking 10;process: articulating opposing ways to solve a vexing problem; analyzing those opposing models to truly understand them; attempting to resolve the antithetical approaches of the opposing models by creating new models that contain elements of the original alternatives but are superior to either one and testing the potential new solutions.

Research limitations/implications

Additional examples and detailed guidance is provided in the authors new book “Creating Great Choices: A Leader’s Guide to Integrative Thinking,” (Harvard Business School Press, 2017).

Practical implications

Several corporate examples of “wicked” problems to which integrative thinking might be applied are: After a merger, the combined sales organization is riven by dissension between proponents of two opposite approaches – one using direct sales and the other channel partners. The CEO of a retail bank struggling to manage the conflicting goals of increasing efficiency and improving customer service.

Originality/value

Applied thoughtfully, this new and tested methodology gives leaders at all levels a fighting chance at solving challenging problems and creating breakthrough choices.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

David Dunne

Because it involves the interests of multiple stakeholders, sustainable value is a “wicked problem” that evades definitive formulation and clear solutions. Traditional…

Abstract

Because it involves the interests of multiple stakeholders, sustainable value is a “wicked problem” that evades definitive formulation and clear solutions. Traditional approaches to problem-solving emphasize formulation of the problem followed by analysis and solution development. However, these approaches are inadequate for solving such problems because of they are so difficult to define. Two ways of approaching wicked problems are discussed: positive design and integrative thinking. Both are more appropriate than linear “formulate-then-solve” approaches, because they emphasize careful reflection and framing, focus on understanding the system as a whole and the needs of its users, and learning. In design, the focus is on deeply understanding users and attempting trial solutions as a means of framing the problem; in integrative thinking, the focus is on exploring the problem by inquiring into the mental models of stakeholders. Tata Motors’ decision to locate its plant in West Bengal was a wicked problem that involved the interests of many stakeholders, and is presented to illustrate the two methods. The failure of this plant location project was extremely costly to Tata and to West Bengal, and it is argued that the decision process would have benefited from either positive design or integrative thinking.

Details

Positive Design and Appreciative Construction: From Sustainable Development to Sustainable Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-370-6

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Ram Narasimhan, Thomas J. Kull and Abraham Nahm

Globalization and accelerating product life cycles require use of time‐based manufacturing practices (TBMP) accompanied by organizational integration. Evidence has…

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1047

Abstract

Purpose

Globalization and accelerating product life cycles require use of time‐based manufacturing practices (TBMP) accompanied by organizational integration. Evidence has suggested that cultural integrative beliefs (IB) influence the presence of TBMP but research has not investigated two alternative theory‐based views: TBMP influences the formation of integrative beliefs; and TBMP and integrative beliefs interact to enhance performance. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between espoused values, TBMP and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors empirically re‐analyze work carried out in 2004 by Nahm et al., using structural equations modeling and factor scores regression.

Findings

Support is found for the competing model that implies IB is a consequent of TBMP rather than an antecedent. This new theoretical perspective is not reconciled via the interaction model.

Practical implications

The authors' re‐examination suggests TBMP and IB are mutually reinforcing, implying that resources can be devoted to simultaneously implementing TBMP and IB, rather than a time‐consuming sequential strategy.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to empirically test three perspectives on how organizational culture and operations management practices interrelate. Conventional conceptions of cultural beliefs' role are questioned and a new perspective is offered. Additionally, the FSR method gives a structured approach to latent variable interaction modeling.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Kylie M. Shaw and Allyson P. Holbrook

This paper aims to respond to the need for a model of doctoral supervision that can capture and represent the focus, range and complexity of instructional intentions…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to respond to the need for a model of doctoral supervision that can capture and represent the focus, range and complexity of instructional intentions, practices and possibilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws on the substantive literature on supervision and changing doctoral programs in the Fine Arts and relatively new empirical findings about supervision and learning. The authors posit a holistic model of supervision ranging across micro–macro and product–person dimensions. The model is further explained and illustrated using four supervisor cases in Fine Arts.

Findings

The model offers a heuristic for supervisors to reflect on and identify existing emphases, alignments and integrative possibilities to better understand the complexities of Fine Arts supervisory practices.

Originality/value

There is a dearth of research that addresses how doctoral supervisors perceive and articulate their roles and breadth of responsibilities in light of new programs and changing sectoral expectations.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2010

Chun‐Hsien Liu and Chu‐Ching Wang

The purpose of this paper is to construct an integrative service model from customer and provider perspectives so that it can be utilized to formulate service business strategies.

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2724

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to construct an integrative service model from customer and provider perspectives so that it can be utilized to formulate service business strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The concepts of the resource‐based view (RBV), customer co‐creation and service modules obtained from a literature review are combined to construct a mathematical model. Based on the model, business strategies are formulated by utilizing existing marketing and service frameworks.

Findings

Innovative services can be generated from the model after combining different core services. To gain competitive advantage in a changing environment, a feedback mechanism should be used to provide dynamism.

Research limitations/implications

An empirical test of the model could be undertaken as a future study to test the validity of the model. Adding more attributes to give the model finer resolution will increase the complexity of the model. Extending the application of the model to firms' internal departments will mean that the relationships between departments have to be reinvestigated.

Practical implications

Obtaining the salient attributes with the heuristics of the 80‐20 rule and the large number principle means optimization of resource utilization under the condition of customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

The model, developed by combining the concepts of RBV, customer co‐creation and service modules, is an innovative tool for the formulation of service business strategies.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Hong Zhang, Kai Zhang, Marco Warsitzka and Roman Trötschel

This paper aims to review and synthesize the existing literature related to negotiation complexity and provides an integrative model to systematically identify and examine…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review and synthesize the existing literature related to negotiation complexity and provides an integrative model to systematically identify and examine factors contributing to negotiation complexity and how they affect negotiating parties’ behaviors and economic and subjective outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach was to combine relevant literature from negotiation in general and from negotiation complexity in particular and to develop and support an integrative model of complexity in real-world negotiations.

Findings

The literature on negotiation complexity and previous analytical frameworks are reviewed from a cross-disciplinary perspective. Based on the integrative review, an integrative model of negotiation complexity is proposed for identifying important complexity contributory factors. Six contributory factors are distinguished based on the three negotiation components – negotiation task, dynamic variables of negotiators and negotiation context. Their effects on negotiation complexity are examined and discussed with respect to four complexity dimensions (i.e. informational and computational, procedural, social and strategic dimensions). Finally, the effects of negotiation complexity on parties’ behaviors and outcomes are examined based on previous theoretical and empirical research and practical tools for managing negotiation complexity are delineated.

Originality/value

The integrative review and conceptualization of negotiation complexity are helpful for gaining a better understanding of negotiation complexity and its management in various real-world domains.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Chun‐Hsien Liu, Chu‐Ching Wang and Yueh‐Hua Lee

The purpose of this paper is to construct a customer‐oriented integrative service model based on the generic service process. Business strategies can then be formulated by…

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2892

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to construct a customer‐oriented integrative service model based on the generic service process. Business strategies can then be formulated by using the model.

Design/methodology/approach

The key classifying dimensions and their respective attributes are identified through literature reviews. Operational dimensions are formed by combining their attributes weighted by manager‐determined importance weights (IW). A generalized mathematical model is built to integrate the core services of a firm with customer‐based performance weight (PW). The integrative service model is constructed by combining the operational dimensions.

Findings

The selected classification model covers knowledge, information and virtual space dimensions that most of the previous service‐process based model lack. The developed model is simpler to understand and to use for managers comparing to the other complicated mathematical models.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical studies need to be done to test the effectiveness of the model. Experienced managers are needed to decide the IW.

Practical implications

Managers can use the developed model to formulate integrated business strategies as well as forecasting competitor's strategies. The developed model is a customer‐oriented approach for service strategy formulation.

Originality/value

A generalized mathematical model is derived for a firm offering “n” kinds of core services. Computer software can be written based on it to handle the complex cases.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 28000