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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2018

Atanu Chaudhuri, Harry Boer and Yariv Taran

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of internal integration, external integration (EI), and supply chain risk management (SCRM) on manufacturing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of internal integration, external integration (EI), and supply chain risk management (SCRM) on manufacturing flexibility, and the moderating effect of SCRM on the relationships between internal and EI, respectively, and manufacturing flexibility.

Design/methodology/approach

Using hierarchical regression, data are analyzed from a sample of 343 manufacturing plants in Asia collected in 2013-2014 as part of the International Manufacturing Strategy Survey (IMSS VI).

Findings

Internal integration and SCRM have a direct effect on manufacturing flexibility. SCRM moderates the relationship between EI and flexibility.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to generalize beyond the flexibility performance of discrete manufacturing firms in Asia.

Practical implications

To benefit from EI and increase their flexibility performance, manufacturing firms need to implement different mechanisms of SCRM to prevent and deal with supply chain risks including those associated with supply chain integration.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the body of knowledge on the relationships between internal integration, EI, SCRM, and manufacturing flexibility.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2017

Terrill L. Frantz

The PMI Risk Framework (PRF) is introduced as a guide to classifying and identifying risks which can be the source of post-merger integration (PMI) failure — commonly…

Abstract

The PMI Risk Framework (PRF) is introduced as a guide to classifying and identifying risks which can be the source of post-merger integration (PMI) failure — commonly referred to as “culture clash.” To provide managers with actionably insight, PRF dissects PMI risk into specific relationship-oriented phenomena, critical to outcomes and which should be addressed during PMI. This framework is a conceptual and theory-grounded integration of numerous perspectives, such as organizational psychology, group dynamics, social networks, transformational change, and nonlinear dynamics. These concepts are unified and can be acted upon by integration managers. Literary resources for further exploration into the underlying aspects of the framework are provided. The PRF places emphasis on critical facets of PMI, particularly those which are relational in nature, pose an exceptionally high degree of risk, and are recurrent sources of PMI failure. The chapter delves into relationship-oriented points of failure that managers face when overseeing PMI by introducing a relationship-based, PMI risk framework. Managers are often not fully cognizant of these risks, thus fail to manage them judiciously. These risks do not naturally abide by common scholarly classifications and cross disciplinary boundaries; they do not go unrecognized by scholars, but until the introduction of PRF the risks have not been assimilated into a unifying framework. This chapter presents a model of PMI risk by differentiating and specifying numerous types of underlying human-relationship-oriented risks, rather than considering PMI cultural conflict as a monolithic construct.

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Abstract

Details

Post-Merger Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-451-9

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Article
Publication date: 21 April 2020

Yanfei Sun and Yinan Ni

This paper aims to construct a measure of integration among global banks and examine its impact on bank insolvencies and bank crises.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to construct a measure of integration among global banks and examine its impact on bank insolvencies and bank crises.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply principal component analysis to measure a bank’s degree of integration to the global banking market. Moreover, they test whether bank integration affects bank insolvency risk, in which they treat the equity of individual banks as a call option.

Findings

The authors find that the banking industry has become more globally integrated over the past two decades. At the individual bank level, results indicate that banks with higher integration levels have more assets, more nontraditional banking services and more interbank businesses. Overall, they find that a bank’s integration level is negatively associated with insolvency risk, which suggests that greater integration with global markets diversifies a bank’s risk. At the country level, banking systems with less integrated big banks, or more integrated smaller banks, are more stable and hence less likely to suffer a banking crisis.

Originality/value

The authors construct a novel measure of integration among global banks and examine its impact on bank insolvencies and bank crises.

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Livhuwani David Nemakonde and Dewald Van Niekerk

Research has demonstrated that governance of disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA) have evolved largely in isolation from each other – through…

Abstract

Purpose

Research has demonstrated that governance of disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA) have evolved largely in isolation from each other – through different conceptual and institutional frameworks, response strategies and plans, at both international, national and subnational levels. As a result, the management of disaster risk through DRR and CCA is highly fragmented. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the set of actors and their location in government that create and shape governance in DRR and CCA integration within the Southern African Development Community (SADC) member states.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws upon a range of data collection techniques including a comprehensive literature review relating to DRR and CCA in general and in the SADC member states, face-to-face interviews and an online survey. A mixed method research design was applied to the study with a total of 35 respondents from Botswana, Madagascar, Malawi, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe participating in the face-to-face interviews and an online survey.

Findings

The analysis shows that DRR and CCA are carried out by different departments, agencies and/or ministries in all but three SADC member states, namely, Mozambique, Mauritius and the Seychelles. Participants were able to highlight the different ways in which integration should unfold. In light of this, the paper proposes a normative model to integrate government organisations for DRR and CCA within SADC member states.

Originality/value

The implementation of the model has the potential to accelerate the integration of organisations for DRR and CCA, with the resultant improvement in the implementation of risk reduction strategies and efficient use of resources.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Ziva Rozen-Bakher

Due to the high failure rate of the M&A strategy, this paper aims to raise the question of whether the pre-M&A performances could predict integration success in…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to the high failure rate of the M&A strategy, this paper aims to raise the question of whether the pre-M&A performances could predict integration success in cross-border M&As with the aim of reducing the integration risk. Cross-border M&A is considered an important strategy for gaining access to foreign markets, but at the same time, cross-border M&As involve a high risk for failure, particularly due to the problematic integration stage in cross-border M&As.

Design/methodology/approach

The study presents a research model that includes six pre-M&A performances – the revenue and profitability of the acquirer and the target, the revenue ratio and profitability ratio – with the aim of analysing if the pre-M&A performances could predict integration success. The sample of the study includes 68 public firms that were engaged in cross-border M&As from 13 countries. The database of the study is based on 272 annual reports (10-K) of the public companies that are included in the sample.

Findings

The results show that the revenue and profitability of the acquirer and the target predict integration success. However, the revenue ratio predicts integration success, but not the profitability ratio. The results also show that a larger target leads to a complicated integration process that ends in a failure of the integration stage, while a larger acquirer could help to facilitate the integration stage. The study also indicates that buying a small target in relation to the acquirer decreases the risks of the integration stage. Moreover, the pre-performances of the acquirer more predict integration success compared to the pre-performances of the target.

Originality/value

The study suggests that buying an inefficient target creates opportunities for removing redundancies, while buying profitable target may hinder the possibilities for eliminating duplicate jobs and operations. This mixed effect highlights the challenges in implementing of M&A strategy in cross-border-M&As.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

R. Eugene Hughes

Stretch goals or targets ask an employee to go beyond the possible (and merely difficult) to the impossible. This performance requirement violates the generally accepted…

Abstract

Stretch goals or targets ask an employee to go beyond the possible (and merely difficult) to the impossible. This performance requirement violates the generally accepted criterion for goal setting that require goals to be verifiable and attainable, with difficulty. Yet, stretch goals are an accepted management tool in organisations such as General Electric. The present paper discusses the potential for the successful implementation of stretch goals based on considerations of workflow integration and risk deviation.

Details

Work Study, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Manuel Ferreira Rebelo, Rui Silva and Gilberto Santos

Protecting business value is regarded to be the cornerstone of any organization. The purpose of this paper is to investigate and explore the potential contributions of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Protecting business value is regarded to be the cornerstone of any organization. The purpose of this paper is to investigate and explore the potential contributions of the integration of standardized management systems (MSs) into an integrated MS. This will support a better coordinated management of different kinds of risks that exist in organizational processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings are based on literature as well as empirical case studies conducted by the authors. It focuses on the potential results of integration of MSs.

Findings

It is found that the integration of MSs leads to a more coherent, extensive, consistent, and harmonized process of identification of hazards. Also, it is found that from integration also results in the minimization of associated risks that affect key aspects of business, considering the organizational context vs requirements of each relevant stakeholder, as defined in related management systems standards.

Research limitations/implications

This research, investigate the risk management (RM) and the integration of MSs from existing research papers about empirical studies for the period 2000-2014, including case studies in which the authors are involved. The number of enterprises can be larger.

Originality/value

Although there is some research regarding RM in organizations related to isolated implementations of MSs, this paper stands in a different perspective, since it addresses the issues emerging from the integration of standardized MSs in a broader perspective.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 21 January 2020

John F. Kros, Mauro Falasca, Scott Dellana and William J. Rowe

The purpose of this paper is to adopt a contingency theory from a quality perspective to develop a model for assessing the impact of counterfeit prevention efforts on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to adopt a contingency theory from a quality perspective to develop a model for assessing the impact of counterfeit prevention efforts on supply chain (SC) performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the participation of 140 managers across ten industry sectors, a theoretical model is proposed and structural equation modeling is used to examine the relationships among SC risk management integration, SC counterfeit risk orientation (CRO), SC counterfeit risk mitigation (CRM), SC metric consistency (MC) and SC performance (service and cost benefits).

Findings

Findings suggest that firms with greater SC risk management integration have a stronger orientation toward counterfeit risk, greater maturity in CRM, more consistent SC metrics and better SC performance outcomes. CRO alone was not found to significantly improve SC MC.

Research limitations/implications

Results are based on managerial perceptions of SC counterfeit risk and performance metrics. Survey respondents were predominantly from the same country (the USA).

Practical implications

The paper represents a potential quality management framework for SC risk management, in the context of counterfeiting that includes a contingency perspective.

Originality/value

The study advances knowledge of how firms may address the challenging issue of counterfeiting in the SC. Empirical findings offer a firm-level quality management framework for managerial decision making in the context of counterfeiting.

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Abstract

Details

Post-Merger Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-451-9

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