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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Martin Schmidt

This paper analyzes what factors drive a company’s decision to align financial and management accounting policies as a measure of integration of management accounting and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper analyzes what factors drive a company’s decision to align financial and management accounting policies as a measure of integration of management accounting and financial accounting at the highest hierarchy levels of a company.

Methodology/approach

Research hypotheses for six different determinants are developed: company size, number of operating segments and subsidiaries, internationality of the business, business strategy, company life cycle stage, and leverage. The hypotheses are tested using International Financial Reporting Standards 8 (IFRS 8) segment report data from a large sample of 175 German publicly listed companies.

Findings

A higher internationality of the business causes companies to choose a lower degree of integration. Companies with a prospector (defender) strategy choose a lower (higher) degree of integration. Companies in later life cycle stages and with higher leverage choose a lower degree of integration as well. Company size does not impact integration.

Practical implications

Companies have to decide whether, and to what extent, to integrate financial and management accounting and align the two sets of accounting policies. German companies have traditionally kept the two sets separate. As the research reported in this paper sheds light on when companies do not consider integration to be beneficial, it is useful for practitioners.

Originality/value

The legal reporting requirements in Germany as well as German accounting traditions make the German setting particularly suited for examining the integration of management accounting and financial accounting. Using the number of adjustments to financial accounting policies made for management accounting purposes is a novel approach, and the number of adjustments is a more fine-grained measure of integration at the highest hierarchy levels of a company than the measures used in prior literature.

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Jan Mouritsen, Tage Skjøtt‐Larsen and Herbert Kotzab

Supply chain management (SCM) is becoming a popular concept both in research and in practice. At the EurOMA Conference in Copenhagen in 2002 many papers focused on SCM as…

Abstract

Supply chain management (SCM) is becoming a popular concept both in research and in practice. At the EurOMA Conference in Copenhagen in 2002 many papers focused on SCM as a research topic. Similarly, an increasing number of companies are establishing positions as supply chain managers. SCM is also a popular theme for trade journals and management conferences. The quest for integration is an explicit or implicit assumption in most literature within SCM. The basic hypothesis is “the more integration – the better the management of the chain”. This article discusses what the term “management” in the concept of SCM stands for. The integration assumption as a “cure all” prescription for SCM is challenged, and questions raised as to when it is possible and desirable to exercise management in supply chains. The main thesis is that it depends very much on the “environment” of the supply chain and the power relations between the participants in the supply chain.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 14 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Helena Forslund

– The purpose of this paper is to explore and generate propositions of factors that affect the degree of performance management process integration in retail supply chains.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and generate propositions of factors that affect the degree of performance management process integration in retail supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The performance management processes of two retail supply chains were explored and their degree of process integration was classified. Differences in the degree of performance management process integration and affecting factors lead to the generation of five propositions.

Findings

Dependence, brand importance, business process integration, performance demand and the existence of a performance management standard seem to be positively related to the degree of performance management process integration in the relation. Both factors that affect process integration in general and performance management process integration specifically are included. Some insights on integration in a vertically integrated retail chain were provided.

Research limitations/implications

This study has specified the knowledge in process integration to the performance management process and expanded it into a retail context. It has generated a number of propositions on factors that affect the degree of performance management process integration, including a factor that was not found in previous research on manufacturing supply chains. The contribution to process integration theory is however limited until the propositions are validated in a broader study.

Practical implications

Knowledge in affecting factors is useful when “performance management managers” need to communicate integration ambitions with other managers within and outside their own company. The detailed descriptions of performance management processes and integration practices can serve as inspiring benchmarks, as in the daily groceries supply chain, where the industry standard is especially interesting. They can also indicate practices to avoid, as in the home textiles supply chain. Another managerial take-away is the need to handle each relation, manufacturer-wholesaler and wholesaler-retailer store, with their specific affecting factors in specific ways.

Originality/value

Previous knowledge on performance management process integration is mainly based on manufacturing companies. This study expands existing knowledge into a retail context.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Paulo Sampaio, Pedro Saraiva and Pedro Domingues

In the past few years, management systems implementation and certification has become a common practice among different types of organizations. In this context, quality…

Abstract

Purpose

In the past few years, management systems implementation and certification has become a common practice among different types of organizations. In this context, quality management systems certification, according to the ISO 9001 standard is in the spotlight, due to over than 1.000.000 certified organizations by the end of 2009. Quality management systems can be integrated with an increasing variety of other subsystems implemented according to other standards, including environmental systems, health and safety, social responsibility, R&D, risk, or human resources, and subsystems raised from specific standards designed for specific activity sectors (HACCP, automotive or aeronautics, medical devices, pharmaceuticals and software). Due to this evolution, careful attention should be taken on how these different subsystems have been and should be articulated, harmonized and integrated. Thus, this paper intends to approach different strategies to achieve integration, with several levels of intensity, depth and authenticity between the different subsystems, and report some final recommendations related with good practices assuring the efficiency and effectiveness of the integration process.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodology has supported this research. Three case studies were conducted on Portuguese companies that have an integrated quality, environmental and safety management system.

Findings

If the companies' strategy is to implement more than one management system, there is a clear advantage of doing it supported on an integrated approach, avoiding the development of organizational “islands” related to each subsystem. This organizational “archipelago” structure is completely far way from any global optimized solution, based on a holistic perspective.

Originality/value

Based on the conclusions that we were able to find out, this paper is an important contribution to the integrated management systems research area, because it states different integration approaches and levels of integration and what are the features that characterize each one of those approaches and levels.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Thais Coutinho Gonçalves Silva, Rosley Anholon, Izabela Simon Rampasso, Osvaldo Luiz Gonçalves Quelhas, Walter Leal Filho, Luis Antonio Santa-Eulalia and Francisco Rodrigues Lima Junior

This article aims to evaluate the integration level of a quality management system (QMS) and an environmental management system (EMS) in a tire manufacturer and propose a…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to evaluate the integration level of a quality management system (QMS) and an environmental management system (EMS) in a tire manufacturer and propose a guide to evaluate the integration of these systems in companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological strategies used in this research were literature review; and case study, with interviews to verify professionals' perception about benefits from integration. Data from interviews were analyzed through Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS).

Findings

The results showed that the studied company has a simple level of integration, observing only some low intensity benefits. Thus, it was recommended that the company partially integrate its management systems (MSs) before evolving into something more complex. The literature and the findings of case study were used as basis for proposing a guide to evaluate MS integration.

Originality/value

Lessons learned throughout the study and the suggested guide can support other companies to assess the integration level of their QMS and EMS. Thus, the findings presented here can be useful for researchers and managers.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2009

W. Rocky Newman, Mark D. Hanna, Thomas Gattiker and Xiaowen Huang

This paper proposes a framework that describes the boundary spanning supply chain management (SCM) initiatives taken by leading companies. Supported by existing literature…

Abstract

This paper proposes a framework that describes the boundary spanning supply chain management (SCM) initiatives taken by leading companies. Supported by existing literature and interviews with managers from large companies reflecting a cross section of businesses, the framework suggests four motivating domains or factors that could support SCM initiatives. They are supply chain understanding, design, improvement, and coordination. Based on the sand cone model, the framework also suggests four levels of SCM integration over which these motivating factors are relevant to the firm and/or supply chain. They range from no integration outside the functional silos of a single firm to a fully integrated multi‐tier supply chain. Unlike existing frameworks that are based upon the flow of material and information through the supply chain, our framework is derived by combining the concept of integration with the motivating domains that characterize SCM initiatives. It captures the combined and overlapping impact of supply chain initiatives from a more strategic perspective and is a useful additional resource for practitioners who seek to chart potential improvements to their supply chain from a competitive standpoint.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2014

Satu Teerikangas and Tomi Laamanen

While there is an increasing understanding of the challenges that can emerge in integration processes of cross-border mergers and acquisitions, there is a scarcity of…

Abstract

While there is an increasing understanding of the challenges that can emerge in integration processes of cross-border mergers and acquisitions, there is a scarcity of research on how the different integrative activities should be temporally sequenced. Based on an in-depth analysis of three acquisitions, we find that structural and cultural integration are intertwined. We find that cultural integration will begin only once structural integration is in progress. Cultural differences can, however, impede structural integration if structural integration is done in conflict with the existing culture of the acquired company. Thus, structural integration should come first, but it should be done in appreciation with the acquired company’s existing culture. Cultural change is then facilitated in an iterative manner over time by the new structure. Our chapter contributes to an improved understanding of the temporal dynamics of integration by demonstrating the mutually reinforcing effects of structural and cultural integration in cross-border acquisitions.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-970-6

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Gunnar Dahlin and Raine Isaksson

The purpose of this paper is to study how the expression “integrated management systems” is interpreted in literature, what it means to have an integrated management

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study how the expression “integrated management systems” is interpreted in literature, what it means to have an integrated management system (IMS) and what the results of this are.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was conducted based on Scopus using the search term “Integrated Management Systems.” In the chosen articles, effects of integration, scope, level and extent of integration and if the approach is inside-out or outside-in, have been analyzed.

Findings

Most articles on IMS conclude that integration is beneficial regarding cost saving, operational benefits and improved customer satisfaction. The general approach in the articles, describes an inside-out approach with focus on integrating existing management standards. The scope of integration covers typically management systems for quality, environment and occupational health and safety.

Practical implications

An IMS is found to be a system that integrates existing management standards based on an inside-out approach. This indicates possibilities for both practical improvement and research in exploring how integrated stakeholder needs could be managed, possibly as process-based IMSs.

Originality/value

This paper sheds light on the ambiguous interpretation of the IMS concept.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Panos T. Chountalas and Filippos A. Tepaskoualos

Despite the widely recognized benefits of integrating management systems, many multi-certified organizations continue to implement two or more systems separately. This can…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the widely recognized benefits of integrating management systems, many multi-certified organizations continue to implement two or more systems separately. This can happen either through ignorance or by deliberate intent. Focusing on the second reason, the purpose of this paper is to examine a number of factors that can lead an organization to consciously choose not to integrate all of its management systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a case study of a construction company that has integrated the environmental management system and the occupational health and safety management system – which implies that the company is familiar with the practice of integration – while choosing to implement the quality management system separately from the other two.

Findings

The findings of this study show that the reasons that led the company not to integrate all of its systems are not so much related to the compatibility of these systems, but are much deeper and have implications that touch upon its basic principles and values. Despite the occurrence of some organizational and operational problems (such as complexity of administrative issues and bureaucracy), the separate implementation of the systems allowed the company to preserve both the balance between the powers of its executives and the ability to attach special importance to each area: quality, environment, health and safety.

Originality/value

This study will be useful in order to understand that selective integration of management systems is based on the belief that integration is not a de facto desirable goal, especially when the estimated cost-benefit ratio of non-integration is better than that of integration.

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2010

Kersti Nogeste

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the practice of program management can be used to manage strategically‐oriented initiatives such as mergers and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the practice of program management can be used to manage strategically‐oriented initiatives such as mergers and acquisitions (M&As).

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology applied is high‐level reflective retrospective qualitative field research conducted by a practitioner‐scholar in response to the research question: How does the program management approach applied to a small‐scale acquisition compare to the current joint bodies of program management and M&A theory and practice?

Findings

The practice of program management provides a means for managing strategically oriented initiatives such as small‐scale acquisitions.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is constrained by a high‐level literature review of English language publications only, and high‐level reflective retrospective qualitative field research conducted by a single practitioner‐scholar upon a single relatively small‐scale acquisition, which cannot necessarily be scaled up to be representative of a larger‐scale acquisition, nor given the differences between M&As be used as a direct template for other M&As. Also, as a purely qualitative field research study into an area of intermediate maturity, the response to the research question lacks statistical support.

Practical implications

M&As are increasing in frequency and yet continue to have relatively high‐failure rates. Based on the findings of this paper, the practice of program management provides a means of managing strategic initiatives such as acquisitions.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the bodies of program management and M&A literature, from the dual perspectives of practice and research, particularly with reference to small acquisitions and acquisitions in the small and medium enterprise sector.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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