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1 – 10 of over 45000
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Ron Coleman, Liz Ellis and Mike Smith

This paper is a discussion of how an organisation providing community support developed its employment strategy to focus on gainful employment, valued employment roles…

Abstract

This paper is a discussion of how an organisation providing community support developed its employment strategy to focus on gainful employment, valued employment roles, citizenship and human rights, from a traditional model with support/activity workers and sheltered employment, to social firms, employment development and supported employment at differing levels.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Hans De Witte, Jan Vandoorne, Roel Verlinden and Nele De Cuyper

Aims to review the research literature and legislation on outplacement and re‐employment interventions in Belgium and present results of qualitative research and case…

1660

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to review the research literature and legislation on outplacement and re‐employment interventions in Belgium and present results of qualitative research and case studies of companies, regarding interventions during organizational restructuring.

Design/methodology/approach

Comprises a literature review, qualitative (semi‐structured and in‐depth) interviews with workers and experts, and case studies of companies.

Findings

The literature on interventions suggests the importance of “traject‐counselling” for affected workers as a most valuable intervention during organizational restructuring. In‐depth interviews with job‐insecure workers highlight the importance of fair treatment, and especially of interactional justice. Case studies and interviews delineate the components that make re‐employment initiatives successful: outplacement interventions include emotional support, training of skills and individual coaching or guidance. Belgian legislation regarding outplacement and re‐employment initiatives is unique and extensive. Possible weaknesses, however, are the complexity of procedures, the unfamiliarity of the public with the legislation and the lack of legislation at an international level.

Research limitations/implications

The reported results are based on qualitative research only. In the future, quantitative evaluation studies need to be performed, in order to evaluate the outcomes of re‐employment initiatives and of the implemented legislation.

Practical implications

The results highlight the need for training of all partners involved in organizational restructuring: workers, managers and outplacement consultants.

Originality/value

This study offers the first integrated account of research results on measures needed to re‐employ workers during (and after) organizational restructuring in Belgium. Various methods (literature review, qualitative interviews and case studies) are used. The results include valuable suggestions for other European countries.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Sarah R. Carlson, Vidya D. Munandar, Michael L. Wehmeyer and James R. Thompson

In the years following high school, youth, including youth with extensive support needs, aspire to pursue a range of personally important experiences, such as attending…

Abstract

In the years following high school, youth, including youth with extensive support needs, aspire to pursue a range of personally important experiences, such as attending postsecondary education programs, obtaining competitive employment, and living independently. However, the level of disability continues to be a powerful predictor of the degree to which desired outcomes materialize in early adulthood. For most young adults with extensive support needs, valued outcomes are elusive. To support youth with disabilities, including youth with extensive support needs, to progress toward achieving their post-school goals, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1990 mandated the provision of transition services. Despite the legal mandate for transition services, numerous factors continue to impact the outcomes experienced by youth with extensive support needs. However, research has identified numerous practices to support improved post-school outcomes. In this chapter, we address the transition mandates of the IDEA, identify and describe factors influencing the post-school outcomes of youth with extensive support needs, and provide strategies, practices, and interventions for improving these outcomes.

Details

Special Education Transition Services for Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-977-4

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Abstract

Details

Special Education Transition Services for Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-977-4

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2009

Helen Lockett

There is an established international evidence base on supported employment for people with severe and enduring mental health problems, and now a growing evidence base on…

Abstract

There is an established international evidence base on supported employment for people with severe and enduring mental health problems, and now a growing evidence base on how to successfully implement this into practice. The process involves substantial organisational development and change, and therefore effective leadership is critical. This article outlines some of the challenges to implementing supported employment services and explores what recent leadership theory could contribute to this process, as the Sainsbury Centre embarks on its Centres of Excellence Programme in England and seeks to build a wider learning community from our partnerships formed through the International Initiative for Mental Health Leadership (IIMHL).

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2015

David W. Test, Jennifer Cease-Cook and Lauren K. Bethune

Research has documented post-school outcomes for students with emotional and behavioral disabilities and learning disabilities continue to be poor. To improve student…

Abstract

Research has documented post-school outcomes for students with emotional and behavioral disabilities and learning disabilities continue to be poor. To improve student outcomes for these populations, research has recommended implementing evidence-based practices and predictors in the classroom. The purpose of this chapter is to identify evidence-based practices and predictors targeted for students with emotional and behavioral disorders and learning disabilities in the area of secondary transition. We identify and briefly describe 12 evidence-based practices and 14 evidence-based predictors for students with emotional and behavioral disorders and learning disabilities. Implications for practice and suggestions for future research are also discussed.

Details

Transition of Youth and Young Adults
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-933-2

Book part
Publication date: 25 April 2011

Joya Misra, Michelle J. Budig and Irene Boeckmann

Purpose – This chapter examines how gender, parenthood, and partner's employment are related to individual's employment patterns, analyzing paid work at individual and…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter examines how gender, parenthood, and partner's employment are related to individual's employment patterns, analyzing paid work at individual and household levels.

Methodology/approach – Analyses use individual-level data from the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) wave 5 for 19 countries, for adults aged 25–45. We use logistic regression and a two-stage Heckman sample selection correction procedure to estimate the effects of gender and parenthood on the probabilities of employment and full-time employment.

Findings – The variation between mothers and childless women is larger than that between childless men and childless women; differences in women's employment patterns are driven by gendered parenthood, controlling for women's human capital, partnered status and household income. Fathers and mothers' employment hours in the same household vary cross-nationally.

Mothers' employment behaviors can identify important differences in the strategies countries have pursued to balance work and family life.

Research implications – Important differences between childless women and mothers exist; employment analyses need to recognize the variation in employment hours among women, and how women's hours are related to partners' hours. Further research should consider factors that shape employment cross-nationally, as well as how these relate to differences in wages and occupational gender segregation.

Practical implications – Employment choices of women and mothers must be understood in terms of employment hours, not simply employment, and within the context of partners' employment.

Originality/value of paper – Our chapter clarifies the wide dispersion of employment hours across countries – and how men's and women's employment hours are linked and related to parenthood.

Details

Comparing European Workers Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-947-3

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 November 2020

Miquel Àngel Pellicena, Ignasi Ivern, Climent Giné and Olga Múries

This study aims to contribute to a better understanding of organizational strategies, attitudes and supports that can help people with intellectual disabilities to access…

1397

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to contribute to a better understanding of organizational strategies, attitudes and supports that can help people with intellectual disabilities to access competitive jobs through supported employment.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study was carried out based on an intentional sampling involving the coworker mentors of six people with intellectual disabilities currently working in standardized environments. Semi-structured interviews were performed with the participants, and an inductive thematic analysis was used for data analysis.

Findings

The study identified five critical factors in the work of people with intellectual disabilities in standardized work environments, which potentially could act as facilitators or as obstacles, depending on how they were managed. The study also identified two key factors that acted mainly as facilitators and one as an obstacle.

Originality/value

The study reveals the existence of factors that sometimes act as facilitators and sometimes as obstacles, depending on how they are managed by the company leaders or the disabled worker himself.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Helen Lockett, Geoffrey Waghorn, Rob Kydd and David Chant

The purpose of this paper is to explore the predictive validity of two measures of fidelity to the individual placement and support (IPS) approach to supported employment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the predictive validity of two measures of fidelity to the individual placement and support (IPS) approach to supported employment.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted of IPS programs. In total, 30 studies provided information characterizing 69 cohorts and 8,392 participants. Predictive validity was assessed by a precision and negative prediction analysis and by multivariate analysis of deviance.

Findings

Fidelity scores on the IPS-15 scale of 60 or less accurately predicted poor outcomes, defined as 43 percent or less of participants commencing employment, in 100 percent of cohorts. Among cohorts with IPS-15 fidelity scores of 61-75, 63 percent attained good employment outcomes defined as 44 percent or more commencing employment. A similar pattern emerged from the precision analysis of the smaller sample of IPS-25 cohorts. Multivariate analysis of deviance for studies using the IPS-15 scale examined six cohort characteristics. Following adjustment for fidelity score, only fidelity score (χ2=15.31, df=1, p<0.001) and author group (χ2=35.01, df=17, p=0.01) representing an aspect of cohort heterogeneity, remained associated with commencing employment.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides evidence of moderate, yet important, predictive validity of the IPS-15 scale across diverse international and research contexts. The smaller sample of IPS-25 studies limited the analysis that could be conducted.

Practical implications

Program implementation leaders are encouraged to first focus on attaining good fidelity, then supplement fidelity monitoring with tracking the percentage of new clients who obtain a competitive job employment over a pre-defined period of time.

Originality/value

The evidence indicates that good fidelity may be necessary but not sufficient for good competitive employment outcomes.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Monika Senghaas, Christopher Osiander, Gesine Stephan and Olaf Struck

In many countries, individuals can receive welfare support whilst simultaneously being employed. The level of earned income that welfare recipients are allowed to keep has…

Abstract

Purpose

In many countries, individuals can receive welfare support whilst simultaneously being employed. The level of earned income that welfare recipients are allowed to keep has long been a subject of debate. Core issues include whether in-work benefit regulations provide incentives for individuals to expand labour market participation and are thus also socially effective and whether the population perceives welfare benefits for individuals who earn own income as fair. This article contributes to the debate about the social legitimacy of in-work benefit regulations by shedding light on the principles guiding judgements about an adequate amount of in-work benefit receipt.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a factorial survey experiment to investigate which factors guide judgements about an adequate level of in-work benefit receipt. In the authors' factorial survey, the household composition, health status, and monthly earnings of a hypothetical in-work benefit recipient were varied experimentally. The study investigates Germany's basic income support programme, a means-tested social policy programme that targets both unemployed and employed individuals.

Findings

The results show that respondents consider higher earnings retention rates for lower-income earners to be fair. This preference mirrors the German legislation, which is based on the principle of need. Furthermore, the presence of children and of physical as well as mental health impairments are associated with support for higher earnings retention rates.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that citizens support the core features of in-work benefit regulations but do not consider in-work benefit recipients as a homogenous group when assessing the adequate level of benefit receipt.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 42 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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