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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2014

Schubert Foo, Shaheen Majid, Intan Azura Mokhtar, Xue Zhang, Yun-Ke Chang, Brendan Luyt and Yin-Leng Theng

– This study aimed to acquire knowledge about Singapore secondary school (ages 13 to 16 years old) students' skills in searching, evaluating and using information.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to acquire knowledge about Singapore secondary school (ages 13 to 16 years old) students' skills in searching, evaluating and using information.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive instrument encompassing the basic information literacy (IL) skills, as well as a new dimension of ethical usage of information and collaborative information seeking was used for data collection. From August to November 2010, a total of eight schools comprising 3,164 students participated in this study.

Findings

It was a matter of concern that various kinds of libraries, including school libraries, were found to be under-utilized. From the test that was administered to assess the IL skills of students, the results were found to be generally unsatisfactory as each of the major categories of IL skills recorded a score that is below 50 (out of a maximum of 100) except for “task definition”. For skills related to “information seeking strategies”, “location & access” and “information use”, the types of schools, academic streams of study, and students' family background seemed to have significant influences.

Originality/value

This study is the first large-scale survey conducted in Singapore that sought to test the IL skills of secondary school students. The findings are useful in assessing the current effectiveness of IL integration, and the need for a more planned approach towards IL competency training within the school curriculum in Singapore.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 66 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Intan Azura Mokhtar and Shaheen Majid

This paper presents the findings of a study that explores the use of school libraries and their resources by teachers, their level of collaboration with their school…

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3494

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents the findings of a study that explores the use of school libraries and their resources by teachers, their level of collaboration with their school librarian, and the problems faced by them in using these libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted and 76 teachers from seven schools in Singapore participated in the study.

Findings

The results showed that teachers generally did not use their school libraries and various information resources effectively, mainly due to the inadequacy of their school libraries in terms of educational materials. In addition, teachers typically did not collaborate with their school librarian in planning their lessons or other academic activities.

Research limitations/implications

The study only managed to involve 76 teachers from seven schools. A larger number of respondents would have been more desirable. However, these 76 respondents represented teachers with teaching experiences that ranged from less than 3 years to more than 20 years. The study provided an insight into the situation of school library use by teachers in Singapore and their related factors. This insight could in turn yield initiatives on various aspects of school library research, such as the role of the school library in the school curriculum, and how school library usage by teachers or school librarian‐teacher collaboration can be improved.

Practical implications

The study proposes that teachers be familiarised with the role of school libraries and librarians through in‐service and pre‐service teacher training courses and through school library outreach programmes.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of the school library in the school curriculum, presents the elements that can contribute to or work against the use of the school library by teachers, and most importantly, proposes strategies that can be implemented to improve the situation as revealed in the study.

Details

Library Review, vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Intan Azura Mokhtar, Shaheen Majid and Schubert Foo

This paper aims to present the findings of a study that investigated the impact of information literacy (IL) teaching approaches, which are grounded in pedagogy, on…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the findings of a study that investigated the impact of information literacy (IL) teaching approaches, which are grounded in pedagogy, on students' level and applicability of IL competencies.

Design/methodology/approach

A quasi‐experimental control group study was carried out with 476 students, aged from 13 to 15 years old, from four secondary (high) schools in Singapore. The students were given a pre‐intervention test in the beginning. Out of the 476 students, 279 students (from two schools) went through a mediated learning intervention programme, while the remaining 197 students went through a multiple intelligence intervention programme. Students were organised into smaller groups of five each, and were given a group project to do. Students in the experimental sub‐clusters were exposed to the respective intervention approaches, while students in the control sub‐clusters were left on their own to carry out the project. A post‐intervention test was administered to all students at the end of the intervention programmes.

Findings

The results of the group reports and project evaluation done by three independent and neutral teacher‐examiners, as well as those from the pre‐ and post‐intervention tests, found that the application of either mediated learning (or close coaching) or multiple intelligences helped students perform better in the learning and application of IL skills.

Research limitations/implications

The study managed to involve 476 students from four secondary (high) schools only. A larger number of students from more schools would have been more desirable. In addition, the inclusion of students from primary (elementary) schools and tertiary institutions would be useful in strengthening the findings. However, the study has sufficiently provided evidence that appropriate pedagogy is important in enhancing the learning and application of IL competencies amongst students. This could in turn yield initiatives on various aspects of IL‐related research, such as in IL policy formulation, and IL pedagogy.

Practical implications

The application of appropriate pedagogical approaches in teaching IL makes the learning and application of IL competencies more effective.

Originality/value

Although it is widely accepted that IL competencies are useful in helping students perform better, both academically or otherwise, limited empirical evidence is available showing the relationship between IL education and IL competencies. The paper highlights the impact of appropriate pedagogy in imparting and entrenching IL competencies in students.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Raj Kumar Bhardwaj

This paper aims to map information literacy literature in social sciences and humanities published during the period of 2001-2012.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to map information literacy literature in social sciences and humanities published during the period of 2001-2012.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for the study are obtained from Scopus, accessible at www.scopus.com. Study used the Transformative Activity Index (TAI) and relative citation impact (RCI) to know the impact of most productive countries and prolific institutions. The SCImago Journal and Country Rank accessible at www.scimagojr.com/ was used to determine the SCImago Journal Rank and source normalized impact per paper.

Findings

The study found that 1990 documents originating from 79 countries were published in this study area. These papers are published in 160 journals with an average ∼12.51 papers per journal. These papers have been cited 10,025 times with ∼5.0. average citations per publication. Study also found that information literacy literature is published in 16 languages and the majority of the papers are in English, 1,879 (94.4 per cent). The highest growth of publications (106.7 per cent) was found in 2005. The USA contributed the highest number, 1,035 (52 per cent) papers. Moreover, of the 15 most productive countries, three recorded TAIs >100, and 12 countries recorded TAIs <100. In all, 160 institutions worldwide have contributed in information literacy research. Study also found that maximum literature published on the subject by a single author is 828 (41.6 per cent). Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain has produced the highest number of papers (24, or 1.2 per cent) and received 61 (0.6 per cent) citations, while University of Strathclyde has the highest RCI (∼2.7) for its publications. Pintos, María from Universidad de Granada has published the maximum number of papers (18) that have been cited 78 times.

Social implications

The study endeavors to showcase information literacy research outcomes in social sciences and humanities. It involves quantitative analysis of the literature in this domain using bibliographic elements such as keywords, authors, affiliation, publication and citations.

Originality/value

No study has been conducted so far to map the information literacy literature in social sciences and humanities. Study will be useful in understanding the progress on information literacy in the area of social sciences and humanities. The study is significant for social scientists to foster further research in this emerging area.

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