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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Mohammad Jalalkamali, Anees Janee Ali, Sunghyup Sean Hyun and Davoud Nikbin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between work values (cognitive, instrumental, social, and prestige), communication satisfaction (informational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between work values (cognitive, instrumental, social, and prestige), communication satisfaction (informational and relational), and employee job performance (task and contextual) in the context of international joint ventures (IJVs) in Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

Validated measurement items for study variables were adopted from previous studies. Data were collected through surveys using a random sample of employees and their direct supervisors from the two largest IJVs in Iran’s automobile industry.

Findings

According to the results, cognitive, instrumental, and prestige work values had significant effects on informational communication satisfaction. All dimensions of work values (cognitive, instrumental, social, and prestige) were significantly related to relational communication satisfaction. Both dimensions of communication satisfaction (informational and relational) were significantly related to both dimensions of employee job performance (contextual and task).

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from two IJVs in Iran, which may limit the generalization of results to non-IJVs in Iran. The results have important implications for IJV managers by providing valuable insights into adopting various effective tools in the workplace.

Originality/value

Previous studies have generally considered work values as a two-dimensional construct. This study extends the literature by conceptualizing work values based on four dimensions (cognitive, instrumental, social, and prestige). No study has taken into consideration social and prestige values in an Asian context. In addition, few studies have investigated the relationships between work values and communication satisfaction.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Dov Elizur

The main objective of the present study was to examine the relationship between work values and commitment. Suggests at the first stage a systematic definition of the work

Abstract

The main objective of the present study was to examine the relationship between work values and commitment. Suggests at the first stage a systematic definition of the work values domain based on two content facets: modality of outcome and system‐performance contingency. Based on this definitional framework, the 24‐item Work Values Questionnaire, constructed by Elizur and his colleagues in previous research, was applied. Included in the questionnaire was a non‐item measure of commitment. It was expected that commitment would be more strongly correlated with cognitive work value items than with instrumental ones. The results generally support the hypotheses. Moderate positive correlations were observed between commitment and independence, job interest, use of abilities and achievement. A positive correlation was also found, however, with pay, which was classified as an instrumental work value item. The meaning of the results and their implications for future research were discussed.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Meng-Long Huo and Peter Boxall

Grounded in the theory of person-organisation fit, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which instrumental work values influence the relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

Grounded in the theory of person-organisation fit, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which instrumental work values influence the relationship between HR practices and employee well-being (measured by job satisfaction) in a sample of Chinese workers.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire data for this cross-sectional, quantitative study were collected from 371 front-line workers in a Chinese manufacturer. Structural equation modelling was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that work instrumentalism significantly reduces the positive effect of training on job satisfaction while boosting the positive effect of remuneration on job satisfaction. In contrast, there is no evidence for an interaction between instrumentalism and employee involvement.

Practical implications

The results imply that the degree to which HR practices are effective in promoting job satisfaction among these Chinese workers depends both on their work-value orientations and on the implications of the particular HR practice. Managers concerned about job satisfaction in China need to consider the impact of work values and the goals of particular HR practices.

Originality/value

China makes an enormously important contribution to world manufacturing output but the authors need a better understanding of how Chinese workers are likely to interpret and respond to HR practices if employee well-being in Chinese enterprises is to be fostered.

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Annelies E.M. van Vianen, Irene E. De Pater and Floor Van Dijk

The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between work value PO fit with fit being operationalized as a same‐source or different‐source measure.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between work value PO fit with fit being operationalized as a same‐source or different‐source measure.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 94 employees from a company located in Curac¸ao completed a questionnaire in which they rated their personal work values, their perceptions of the work values of the organization, and their turnover intention.

Findings

The different‐source work value fit measure was significantly and more strongly related to turnover intention than the same‐source work value fit measure.

Research limitations/implications

This study underscores the need for a careful reflection on the content and operationalization of fit measures.

Practical implications

Managers are able to manage the fit of their employees by creating positive group level perceptions of the work environment.

Originality/value

This study examines the effects of different fit measures on individuals' turnover intention. Moreover, work values fit was investigated.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Edem M. Azila-Gbettor, Robert J. Blomme, Ad Kil and Ben Q. Honyenuga

The study examines organization citizenship behavior (OCB) as a mediating variable between instrumental work values (IWVs) and organizational performance; and group…

Abstract

The study examines organization citizenship behavior (OCB) as a mediating variable between instrumental work values (IWVs) and organizational performance; and group differences between family manager and nonfamily manager for integrated models in family hotels. Data were collected from 189 hotels (n = 921) ranging from budget to three-star family hotels in Ghana using questionnaire administered conveniently. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Work value positively influences OCB and organizational performance of family hotels. OCB mediates the relationship between work values and organizational performance. The study also found significant support for group differences between family and nonfamily firms for IWVs and mediating effect of OCB on the relationship between IWVs and performance.

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Evangelia Demerouti, Arnold B. Bakker and Yitzhak Fried

This study aims to examine the role of instrumental vs intrinsic work orientations in the job demands‐resources (JD‐R) model.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the role of instrumental vs intrinsic work orientations in the job demands‐resources (JD‐R) model.

Design/methodology

Using a sample of 123 employees, the authors investigated longitudinally whether an instrumental work orientation moderates the motivational process, and mediates the health impairment process in the JD‐R model.

Findings

Regression analyses revealed that an increase in job resources over time was particularly beneficial for experienced flow at Time 2 among employees holding an instrumental (vs intrinsic) work orientation. In addition, structural equation modeling analyses showed that work pressure was reciprocal with need for recovery, which was reciprocal with instrumental work orientation.

Research limitations/implications

Findings suggest that work orientation should be integrated in research linking work characteristics with motivational and health impairment processes.

Practical implications

Organizations should avoid placing overly high demands on their employees as these not only impair employees' health, but also change their orientation towards work.

Social implications

Organizations can contribute to the wellbeing of individuals and society by designing jobs that provide affordable demands and sufficient resources.

Originality/value

The present study successfully integrated work orientations in the JD‐R model.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2019

Marina Anna Schmitz

This paper aims to provide insights into current issues, such as changing expectations and needs of blue-collar workers, from both an employee and HR perspective, to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide insights into current issues, such as changing expectations and needs of blue-collar workers, from both an employee and HR perspective, to provoke further research in the business context on this crucial cohort, as well as broaden the current understanding of Human Resources Management (HRM) measures and incentives implemented by the respective foreign companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The author conducted semi-structured interviews with 25 Chinese employees of German multinational companies working in the automobile industry located in Shanghai. Among them, 17 were blue-collar workers and 8 were white-collar workers (General Manager or HR Manager).

Findings

Besides factors attributed to work conditions, all of the work values are located in the individual domain, regarding their level of focus (Facet C according to Lyons et al.). Work values in the growth orientation domain (Facet B according to Lyons et al.) show a mix between context- and growth-oriented factors. However, context-oriented factors are still outnumbering the frequency of growth-oriented ones. Regarding the modality of work values (Facet A), all of the categories (instrumental, social, cognitive and prestige) were reflected in the answers of the blue-collar workers.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the limited number of interviewees no final statement can be made on how age, education, gender, or other demographics influence certain work values. Additionally, Inglehart and Abramson (1994) also mention other potential explanations for observed differences, such as inflation or unemployment rates, and per capita gross national product which were not discussed in this research. Furthermore, the HR management selected the interview candidates regarding the blue-collar cohort which could indicate biased answers of the interviewees.

Practical implications

HRM systems (e.g. reward systems or job design) should be adapted to meet the individual preferences of employees and be sensitive toward a potential value change among certain generational cohorts. The findings showed that although pay is still on the mind of the blue-collar worker, career development seems to be even more important for the future blue-collar workforce. Therefore, companies should as well consider non-financial retention strategies in the future.

Social implications

Due to the talent shortage in China, employee’s ability to assert their interests, wishes and values could be taken to a new level. However, this does not hold true for the (still increasing) flood of migrant workers, often suffering from bad working conditions or discrimination incurred by their hukou status. Although recent changes in the labor regime have taken place (e.g. social insurance reform and labor contract law), the protection of migrant workers still remains insufficient.

Originality/value

By examining the work values of blue-collar workers, this paper draws meaningful implications for talent management with regard to work outcomes, in particular voluntary employee turnover, which is considered to be an issue of concern by both economists and businessmen.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 10 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

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Book part
Publication date: 15 February 2018

Eddy S. Ng, Sean T. Lyons and Linda Schweitzer

Abstract

Details

Generational Career Shifts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-583-2

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Book part
Publication date: 12 April 2014

Kathryn H. Dekas and Wayne E. Baker

A work orientation represents a person’s beliefs about the meaning of work – the function work plays in the person’s life and the constellation of values and assumptions…

Abstract

Purpose

A work orientation represents a person’s beliefs about the meaning of work – the function work plays in the person’s life and the constellation of values and assumptions the person holds about the work domain. Research has suggested that adults tend to favor one of three primary work orientations: job, career, or calling. Empirical studies have shown that adults with different primary work orientations tend to experience different work and career outcomes; however, scholars have not analyzed how or why an individual first develops a work orientation. In this study, we take a first step toward investigating the origins of adults’ work orientations.

Design/methodology/approach

We propose hypotheses drawing on extant literature on the development of work values and occupational inheritance. We test hypotheses using a retrospective research design and survey methodology, with a sample of working adults.

Findings

Work orientations are developed through socialization processes with parents during adolescence. There are different patterns of development across the three work orientation categories: stronger calling orientations are developed when both parents possess strong calling orientations; stronger career orientations develop in accordance with fathers’ career orientations; and job orientations are related more to the nature of the adolescent’s relationship with parents than with parents’ own work orientations.

Originality/value

This research provides the first empirical study of the origin and development of work orientations.

Research limitations/implications

This research offers insight into ways generations are connected through the perceived meaning of their work, even as the nature of work changes. We encourage future scholars to use this as a starting point for research on the development of work orientations, and to continue exploring these questions using additional methods, particularly longitudinal study designs.

Details

Adolescent Experiences and Adult Work Outcomes: Connections and Causes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-572-2

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2010

Jan Selmer and Romie Littrell

The purpose of this paper is to investigate changes in the relative importance to individuals of particular work values during the deterioration of external economic conditions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate changes in the relative importance to individuals of particular work values during the deterioration of external economic conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employed longitudinal field survey techniques, comparing the change relative work value priorities at an initial and two subsequent points in time during dramatic economic swings in Hong Kong. The paper also evaluate needs hierarchies such as Maslow's and Elizur's, minimally adjusted for a Chinese cultural context for a theoretical framework for assessing the shifting importance of work values resulting from changing local economic conditions.

Findings

The major contribution is the finding of statistically significant changes in the differing importance to individuals of particular work values during the deterioration of external economic conditions. The paper demonstrates that the needs hierarchy theories provide an appropriate framework for the shifting importance of work values resulting from local economic conditions.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is in a single location, limiting generality of the results. All longitudinal studies are affected by panel attrition. Replication with larger samples and tracking of panel drop‐outs are needed for theoretical development.

Practical implications

These results have crucial implications for the effective management of business firms and their human resources in changing economic conditions, finding that work values of managers are not invariant but change with conditions.

Originality/value

The majority of studies on work values of employees have been performed, analyzed, and interpreted in a vacuum, in isolation from consideration of critically import variables, the current, historical, and expected future economic environment of the employee. The paper finds work values change due to environmental circumstances; this effect has rarely been studied.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resources Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

Keywords

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