Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Adewumi I. Badiora

In Nigeria, vigilantism appears to be a common response to dissatisfaction about the state police in the recent time. Using survey data of residents in Lagos, Nigeria, the…

Abstract

Purpose

In Nigeria, vigilantism appears to be a common response to dissatisfaction about the state police in the recent time. Using survey data of residents in Lagos, Nigeria, the purpose of this paper, therefore, is to explore whether what is already known about perceptions of procedural (in) justice of state police also applies to self-help security groups in Nigeria. This is with a view to influencing community support for and satisfaction with non-state policing in the country.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a case study approach. Lagos, Nigeria was stratified into the high, medium and low densities. Systematic sampling technique was used in selecting 1 out of every 20 buildings (5 percent) in each area. Household representative person on each floor of the selected building who had contact with vigilante corps in the last 12 months were targeted. Of 768 copies of questionnaires administered, a sample of 386 was effectively returned (representing 50 percent response rate). Six categories of variables were analyzed. These are procedural justice, distributive justice, vigilante corps’ performance, legitimacy, residents’ satisfaction with vigilante corps activities and socio-economic characteristics.

Findings

Results reveal that respondents are not primarily instrumental in their support for vigilantisms. Instead, their support is associated with their basic communal values. More than effectiveness in controlling crime, vigilantisms receive community support provided they use procedural justice in dealings with the public. Respondents who perceive vigilantisms use procedural justice also view them as legitimate, and as well satisfy with their activities and services. Besides, results show that support for and satisfaction with vigilantisms are associated with environmental, social and economic characteristics of the residents in the community they serve. The thesis supported in this research paper is that public support for and satisfaction with vigilantisms can be influenced significantly through policing strategies that builds legitimacy.

Originality/value

Vigilantism pervades contemporary policing strategies. It is supported by national crime prevention policies, according to the logic that the use of community self-help security strategies could contribute to sustainable crime prevention. This study extends research on legitimacy, with an empirical focus on Nigerian vigilantism. Understanding factors that shape public support for vigilantism may enhance safer communities.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 January 2009

Ruth Klendauer and Jürgen Deller

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactional justice can explain the frequently reported low…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactional justice can explain the frequently reported low organizational commitment of managers in corporate mergers. Specifically, it aims to examine whether each of the justice dimensions is significantly and uniquely related to affective commitment, which of the justice dimensions has the strongest relationship with the criterion, and whether instrumental evaluations or trust might function as a mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 128 managers from 37 companies completed a questionnaire. They had been involved in domestic or European mergers or acquisitions, which varied in the application of fairness rules.

Findings

Although each fairness dimension correlated positively with affective commitment, only interactional justice showed a unique relationship with it. Results indicate that both instrumental evaluations and trust can function as a mediator.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the cross‐sectional design, conclusions about the causal order of the variables cannot be drawn.

Practical implications

The authors recommend that top managers should pay extra attention to timely, candid and specific internal communication with thorough and reasonable explanation of decisions, as well as the respectful treatment of managers. Moreover, the results indicate that managers reacted positively to fairness because it conveys positive relational signals, and because one can gain personal advantages through fair outcomes and processes.

Originality/value

The organizational justice approach has not yet been applied, to the authors' knowledge, in quantitative field studies of mergers. Furthermore, this paper offers a contribution to the literature on fairness heuristic theory.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Brian C. Renauer and Emma Covelli

This paper aims to use three theoretical perspectives to understand variation in public opinion regarding the frequency with which police use race/ethnicity unfairly in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use three theoretical perspectives to understand variation in public opinion regarding the frequency with which police use race/ethnicity unfairly in making stops: procedural and instrumental justice, local government responsiveness, and intra‐racial differences.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper looks at data from a telephone survey of 1,431 Oregon residents: 741 from a stratified state‐wide random sample by county; 164 African‐Americans and 161 Hispanics over samples.

Findings

Perceived negative treatment during recent involuntary police contacts is related to a perception that police are more biased. Instrumental judgments regarding local government responsiveness to constituent needs and personal safety showed a negative relationship to perceptions of police bias. African‐American respondents exhibited the strongest police bias opinions; however, intra‐racial analyses showed that perceptions of government responsiveness weaken bias perceptions across race/ethnicity.

Research limitations/implications

Research needs to explore how the public's relationship to their local government influences perceptions of police. The conclusions of the study are limited by the cross‐sectional design.

Practical implications

The study illustrates that proper police‐citizen communication tactics, stop and investigatory procedures, and ethical decision making should continue to be reinforced along with better promotion of local government and police success in meeting constituent needs through the media.

Originality/value

The paper examines the influence of both procedural and instrumental justice perceptions, and voluntary and involuntary police contacts. The sample contains sufficient numbers of African‐Americans and Hispanics and diverse communities (urban, suburban, and rural) to gain a representative view.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Kevin P. Farmer and Jane K. Miller

The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical framework for assessing the effects representatives have on their client's perceptions of justice, outcome and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical framework for assessing the effects representatives have on their client's perceptions of justice, outcome and satisfaction, as well as the treatment received by clients from other stakeholders, in workplace dispute resolution processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Research propositions are advanced based on constructs and theories drawn from the literature on organizational justice, in particular, as well as social psychology in general.

Findings

Representatives are hypothesized to have a profound effect on their client's perceptions of voice, participation and satisfaction as well as on the treatment accorded the client by the other side and third‐party neutral. Representation, per se, is heralded as neither a positive nor a negative force in workplace dispute resolution processes.

Research limitations/implications

The framework of a representative's effects is limited by a focus on individual employees who pursue disputes arising out of the employment relationship against management and, therefore, excludes disputes involving groups as well as non‐employment related disputes.

Practical implications

Suggestions for expanding or contracting the role of representatives in workplace dispute resolution are discussed.

Originality/value

Although it is ubiquitous in US jurisprudence and is a growing presence in alternative dispute resolution, the representative‐client dyad has been unexplored. The impact representatives have on the client's perceptions of justice, and the effects representatives have on other stakeholders in the process, bear scrutiny.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Chenwei Li, Keke Wu, Diane E. Johnson and Min Wu

The purpose of this study is to examine the mediating role of perceived procedural justice and interactional justice on the relationship between moral leadership and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the mediating role of perceived procedural justice and interactional justice on the relationship between moral leadership and the four psychological empowerment dimensions manifested in individuals' perceptions of meaning, competence, self‐determination, and impact.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 241 subordinates, who reported to 110 supervisors, were collected from clothing companies in southern mainland China. The subordinates responded to a self‐report survey, which consisted of the variables of interest. Because of the nature of nested data, hierarchical linear regression (HLM 6.0) was used for analysis.

Findings

A fully mediated model of perceived justice was supported. Procedural justice and interactional justice were found to be differentially associated with the elements of psychological empowerment. Specifically, while perceived procedural justice accounted for more unique variance in the empowerment facets of meaning, competence, and impact, perceived interactional justice accounted for more unique variance in the facet of self‐determination.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by first examining the relationships among moral leadership, two types of perceived justice, and the four empowerment dimensions in the Chinese context. A detailed discussion of the implication for both researchers and practitioners is also provided.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Piyali Ghosh, Alka Rai and Apsha Sinha

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactional justice are related to employee engagement, as an extension of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactional justice are related to employee engagement, as an extension of the antecedents-consequences model of Saks (2006), and to examine the possibility of inter-relationships between these three dimensions of justice.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 210 employees of public sector banks in India covered measures of job and organization engagement (OE) proposed by Saks (2006) and the scale on distributive, procedural and interactional justice developed by Niehoff and Moorman (1993). The relationships between justice perceptions and engagement were analysed using correlations and hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

Results show that distributive, procedural and interactional are inter-related with each other. Further, distributive and interactional justice take precedence over procedural justice in determining job engagement, while distributive justice plays the most important role in determining OE, followed by procedural and interactional justice.

Practical implications

By highlighting the inter-relationships among the three dimensions of justice, this study offers useful insights into the underlying processes through which job and OE can be improved through these inter-relationships. Findings also highlight the application of concepts like relative deprivation in Indian public sector banks to increase the engagement levels of their employees.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the very small number of studies that have investigated the role of interactional justice in enhancing job and OEs. It has also established inter-relationships between the three dimensions of organizational justice and their individual roles in determining job and OEs.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Julie Cloutier and Benoit Lamarche

This study aims to identify the predictors of successful implementations of pay equity plans. Drawing on the perspective of organizational justice, this study highlights…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the predictors of successful implementations of pay equity plans. Drawing on the perspective of organizational justice, this study highlights the factors that lead to the establishment of perceived fair pay for female-dominated jobs.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected from 107 respondents in a Canadian company that implemented a pay equity plan as required by the Quebec Pay Equity Act.

Findings

Justice perceptions of employees are based on: uniformity of implementation, bias suppression with respect to the right to fair pay, reliability of information on job content, relevance of job evaluation criteria, qualifications and impartiality of the pay equity committee members and the quality of employees’ representation and process transparency.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted at a single workplace and among relatively highly educated respondents. Replicating the study may allow to verify the transferability of the results by considering workers’ demographic characteristics and organizational culture.

Practical implications

The study highlights the cornerstones that may guide the development of an assessment tool of the effectiveness of pay equity processes. These results will additionally help employers to circumvent difficulties which may otherwise thwart the implementation of pay equity plans.

Originality/value

This study highlights how employees construct their perceptions of justice in a specific context. It sheds light on the salient features of the pay equity implementation, the sources of information involved and the justice rules used. This study also highlights the specific forms of the justice rules in this context.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 January 2008

Pablo Zoghbi‐Manrique de Lara

Anomia (from the Greek, an‐: absence, and ‐nomos: law) describes pessimistic feelings such as social detachment and little faith in human relations. This study seeks to…

Abstract

Purpose

Anomia (from the Greek, an‐: absence, and ‐nomos: law) describes pessimistic feelings such as social detachment and little faith in human relations. This study seeks to examine an explanation of how and why person‐organization fit (POF) – operationalized as value congruence – may influence organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) directed at the organization (OCB‐O) and individuals (OCB‐I). The thesis is that unfavorable POF will elicit employees' anomic feelings, which in turn will prompt them to reciprocate with decreased OCB.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 84 of the 198 (42.4 percent) employees of a provincial Spanish Social Security agency. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test mediation.

Findings

The results support that POF predicts anomic feelings that, in turn, fully mediate the link between POF and OCB‐O, but not with OCB‐I.

Research limitations/implications

The employees surveyed have job conditions inherent to the peculiarities of the public sector that may limit the ability to extrapolate the findings to the private sector.

Practical implications

The findings offer a better understanding of the way POF is able to affect OCB, and suggest that actions designed to promote POF may be useful in managing anomic processes in the workplace.

Originality/value

Anomia as a mediator in the relationship between POF, as value congruence, and OCB has not been empirically studied.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2007

María Jesús Suárez‐Mendoza and Pablo Zoghbi‐Manrique‐de‐Lara

The purpose of this research is to examine work alienation (WA) as a mediator in the relationship between employees' perceptions of person‐organization (PO) fit …

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine work alienation (WA) as a mediator in the relationship between employees' perceptions of person‐organization (PO) fit – operationalized as value congruence – and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) directed at their organization (OCBO), co‐workers (OCBIC), and students or clients (OCBIS).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 99 of the 156 (63.5 percent) teachers at a district high school in Spain. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the predicted relationships.

Findings

Results support that PO fit is an antecedent of OCBO, OCBIC, and OCBIS and also, in general, that the three dimensions of WA (powerlessness, meaninglessness, and self‐estrangement) mediate this link. Separately, all WA dimensions are totally or partially supported as “full mediators,” except for powerlessness and meaninglessness that appear to act on OCBIS as “partial mediators.” The model tested suggests PO fit predicts OCB and that this relationship can be explained by the mediating role of WA.

Research limitations/implications

Subjects in this study reflect job conditions peculiar to the public sector. This may limit the ability to extrapolate the findings to the private sector. Also, results may not generalize to other cultural or national contexts. The findings contribute to an improved understanding of the influence of PO value fit/misfit on OCB.

Practical implications

Understanding how PO fit is able to affect citizenship behavior suggests that actions designed to promote PO fit may be useful for more efficiently managing employee WA, and, therefore, more powerfully eliciting OCB in the workplace.

Originality/value

Employee work alienation is demonstrated to be a mediator in the relationship between PO fit and OCB. This is the first empirical test of this relationship.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Deanna Geddes, Kimberly Merriman, Gerald Ross and Denise Dunlap‐Hinkler

Individuals in two separate studies participated in a self‐appraisal activity in which they were randomly assigned to three conditions promising different levels of…

Abstract

Individuals in two separate studies participated in a self‐appraisal activity in which they were randomly assigned to three conditions promising different levels of potential influence on the evaluation of a written assignment. Self‐report data regarding perceptions of voice impact, voice appreciation, and procedural and distributive justice were analyzed. Results of MANOVA and regression suggest voice appreciation, measuring value expressive effects, was positively and significantly related to perceptions of justice, while the self appraisal's perceived impact on a valued outcome was not. However, the impact of value expressive effects on perceptions of fairness was reduced somewhat with higher instrumental possibilities for voice among undergraduate students. Implications for ongoing research and practical applications are discussed regarding the use of various forms of self appraisal.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

1 – 10 of over 6000