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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Justine L. Martin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate course instructor perceptions into personal and classroom use of computer‐generated bibliographic citations. The paper aims to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate course instructor perceptions into personal and classroom use of computer‐generated bibliographic citations. The paper aims to provide guidance as librarians promote and teach automated citation services to the academic communities.

Design/methodology/approach

Course instructors at one university completed a quantitative survey about computer‐generated bibliographic citations. Questions focused on instructor use of automated citation services, if they generally reduce grades for bibliographic errors, if they would reduce grades for specific computer‐generated citation (CGC) errors, and would they advise students to use automated citation services at various course levels.

Findings

The results show a majority of course instructors do not use CGCs for their own research or promote the citation services in the classroom. A majority of respondents generally reduce student grades for bibliographic errors and would continue to do so for CGC errors. The data show specific types of automatically generated citation errors are more detrimental to student grades than others. Furthermore, results indicate course level impacts instructor promotion of CGCs.

Practical implications

The results provide librarians with helpful data, from the course instructor perspective, as they promote and teach computer‐generated bibliographic citations.

Originality/value

Literature on computer‐generated bibliographic citations tends to focus on technical and comparative aspects of citation services, or users' product opinions. This paper explores course instructor use, course promotion, and bibliographic grading of automatically generated citations to enhance advocacy and instruction of these services.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Sue Stockdale

The purpose of this paper is to explore what training professionals can learn from motor sport driving instructors by modelling how they provide instruction to novices in

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore what training professionals can learn from motor sport driving instructors by modelling how they provide instruction to novices in high-performance vehicles during experience days at Silverstone Race Circuit, England.

Design/methodology/approach

Using neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) modelling techniques, three instructors were interviewed about how they provide effective instruction. The results highlight their cognitive and behavioural patterns that enable them to achieve high levels of performance in a high-risk environment.

Findings

The results highlighted how instructors are highly effective in being able to put a novice driver at ease prior to driving; and in communicating effectively with the novice driver in-car whilst on the circuit, so that they achieve more than they imagined was possible.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst the researcher had the opportunity to experience being driven around a race circuit with one of the instructors to get a sense of the environment being described, there was not the chance to observe the instructor “in action” with novice drivers at the wheel.

Practical implications

The key implication is the importance of the pre-event stage of a training course that provides the opportunity for an instructor to gauge the learners and build trust.

Originality/value

This paper provides originality in how it explores the cognitive and behavioural aspects of delivering instruction in an environment that can be translated into the workplace.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 November 2022

Chulapol Thanomsing and Priya Sharma

Social media are increasingly being used in teaching and learning in higher education. This paper aims to explore multiple case studies to better understand how instructors

Abstract

Purpose

Social media are increasingly being used in teaching and learning in higher education. This paper aims to explore multiple case studies to better understand how instructors decide to incorporate social media into learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative case study used the technology acceptance model (TAM) to explore five instructors' use of social media for teaching and learning, particularly the pedagogical reasons and goals driving their use of social media. Participant interviews, course documentation and social media observation data were collected to answer the research questions.

Findings

Findings suggest that an instructor's social media knowledge and awareness of instructional goals are important for the use of social media in learning. Three pedagogical objectives of the use of social media were found across five participants: collaborative learning, dialog and discussion, and authentic learning.

Originality/value

Previous studies have explored potential pedagogical uses of social media tools, however studies that attempt to understand how and why instructors decide to use particular social media tools are underreported.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2021

Holly Chiu, William Hampton-Sosa and Tomas Lopez-Pumarejo

Instructors had to adapt to the online teaching environment after the higher education institutions were closed due to the pandemic. The authors surveyed and interviewed…

Abstract

Instructors had to adapt to the online teaching environment after the higher education institutions were closed due to the pandemic. The authors surveyed and interviewed instructors to understand how the quality of instructional technologies affected compatibility and psychological availability, which further affected their online teaching satisfaction and online teaching intention. The results showed that both information quality and service quality were positively associated with compatibility, while system quality was positively associated with psychological availability. Also, both compatibility and psychological availability were positively associated with online teaching satisfaction. Compatibility and online teaching satisfaction were associated with online teaching intention. The results from both open-ended questions and in-depth interviews provide support to the quantitative model and present a more complete picture of what instructors experienced during the lockdown.

Details

Work from Home: Multi-level Perspectives on the New Normal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-662-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 January 2014

Learner-centered interactions determine the look and feel of online courses, influencing the way learners experience them. In this chapter we investigate considerations…

Abstract

Learner-centered interactions determine the look and feel of online courses, influencing the way learners experience them. In this chapter we investigate considerations related to three types of interactions: learner–content, learner–instructor, and learner–learner. Learners interact with content through the course structure and layout. They also interact with peers who may be cast in the role of community members, there to provide social support, or they may be more prominently cast as information providers and/or collaborators. The learner is at the center of both content and peer interactions. Instructor interactions set expectations for learners and facilitate learner interactions with content and peers. Instructors are instrumental forces in bringing about connections between learners, enabling the social presence necessary for collaboration. Instructor interaction may also be relational, enabling individualized connections between learners and the instructor. Redesign decisions center on creating a course structure that fits the learner and content and results in a satisfying course experience. We use the power of metaphor to bring into focus the most relevant considerations. In the end, we illustrate the redesign of a single course through the lens of three separate metaphors to demonstrate how metaphor shapes the process, bringing together design and interaction decisions to create unique and elegant course designs.

Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2012

Bill N. Schwartz and Alan A. Cherry

We describe an innovative course whose purpose is to expose business students who are not accounting majors to the importance of accounting in the corporate world. We…

Abstract

We describe an innovative course whose purpose is to expose business students who are not accounting majors to the importance of accounting in the corporate world. We achieve this purpose by devoting most of the class time to speakers who work in the “real, global world,” such as auditors, corporate executives, and business journalists. Students do not prepare journal entries or financial statements. Rather, they listen to presentations by a variety of individuals, ask them questions, write reflections of each presentation, and do a term project focusing on a real corporation's accounting issues. The course structure has been successful at helping students gain an appreciation of the importance of accounting in the business world they soon will be entering. The course also helps students to develop critical skills, including attentive listening, asking questions (as opposed to only answering them), reflective ability, analytical ability, and writing skills. Student feedback has been a critical component to the continuous improvement in the course.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-757-4

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2022

Dikla Barak, Merav Aizenberg and Gila Cohen Zilka

The purpose of the study is to examine whether the remote teaching experience of instructors in higher education during the COVID-19 pandemic has improved after one year.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to examine whether the remote teaching experience of instructors in higher education during the COVID-19 pandemic has improved after one year.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved 75 instructors teaching at an institution of higher education in Israel, who answered twice (once in 2020 and again in 2021) a quantitative questionnaire that examined their remote teaching experience.

Findings

The hypotheses about greater use of digital tools and about more positive attitudes of instructors toward remote teaching and learning at the second measurement than at the first one were confirmed. This hypothesis about lower levels of technical difficulties in remote teaching at the second measurement was not confirmed, but the level of reported difficulty was already low at the first measurement.

Practical implications

It is recommended that academic institutions continue the trend of deploying innovation in teaching with confidence in the ability of instructors to adapt to change. At the same time, instructors should be provided with mental and technical support.

Originality/value

Few studies have examined the change in attitudes of instructors toward remote teaching over time. In the present study, we used a repeated measures design, which made it possible to monitor the instructors’ adaptation to remote teaching. Adaptation to the new teaching method can contribute to innovation in teaching in academic institutions and to improvement in its quality.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2020

Alex Rockey, Lorna Gonzalez, Megan Eberhardt-Alstot and Margaret Merrill

Connectedness is essential for student success in online learning. By projecting themselves as real people through video, instructors support connectedness. In this…

Abstract

Connectedness is essential for student success in online learning. By projecting themselves as real people through video, instructors support connectedness. In this chapter, researchers apply the theory of social presence (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000) to case studies from two public higher education institutions: a four-year university and a large research university. Analysis identifies video as a humanizing element of online courses. Findings suggest video could be used in a variety of ways (e.g., video lectures, synchronous office hours, weekly overview videos), and no single use of video was perceived to be more or less effective in developing social presence and humanizing the learning experience. However, participants especially perceived connectedness when video was used in a variety of ways. Students from the second case study validated a perception of connectedness to the instructor that faculty in our first case study hoped to achieve. However, one instructor’s perception of disconnect illustrates that video is just one of several pedagogical practices necessary to create a satisfying learning experience for both students and instructors. While video is not the only way to establish social presence, findings suggest video is an effective practice toward creating a humanized and connected online learning community.

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-035-7

Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2010

N. Sharon Hill and Karen Wouters

E-learning programs exist in a wide variety of formats. Without a framework for distinguishing between different e-learning programs, it is a challenge for researchers to…

Abstract

E-learning programs exist in a wide variety of formats. Without a framework for distinguishing between different e-learning programs, it is a challenge for researchers to compare their effectiveness or identify characteristics of e-learning that contribute to learning effectiveness. Based on general theories of learning, we develop a typology that compares e-learning programs in terms of the nature of the learning interactions they provide for learners in three dimensions: degree of interaction, learner control of interactions, and informational value of interactions. The typology dimensions apply to learner–instructor, learner–learner, and learner–instructional material interactions. We also discuss important theoretical implications of the typology. First, we show the utility of the typology for comparing the effectiveness of different e-learning programs. Second, we apply the typology dimensions to develop a theoretical framework for e-learning research that provides a foundation for examining factors that influence learning effectiveness in an e-learning program. The framework identifies e-learning program characteristics, learner characteristics, and contextual factors that impact learning effectiveness in different e-learning environments. It also shows how the typology dimensions align with learning goals to influence learning effectiveness.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-126-9

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