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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Justine L. Martin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate course instructor perceptions into personal and classroom use of computer‐generated bibliographic citations. The paper aims to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate course instructor perceptions into personal and classroom use of computer‐generated bibliographic citations. The paper aims to provide guidance as librarians promote and teach automated citation services to the academic communities.

Design/methodology/approach

Course instructors at one university completed a quantitative survey about computer‐generated bibliographic citations. Questions focused on instructor use of automated citation services, if they generally reduce grades for bibliographic errors, if they would reduce grades for specific computer‐generated citation (CGC) errors, and would they advise students to use automated citation services at various course levels.

Findings

The results show a majority of course instructors do not use CGCs for their own research or promote the citation services in the classroom. A majority of respondents generally reduce student grades for bibliographic errors and would continue to do so for CGC errors. The data show specific types of automatically generated citation errors are more detrimental to student grades than others. Furthermore, results indicate course level impacts instructor promotion of CGCs.

Practical implications

The results provide librarians with helpful data, from the course instructor perspective, as they promote and teach computer‐generated bibliographic citations.

Originality/value

Literature on computer‐generated bibliographic citations tends to focus on technical and comparative aspects of citation services, or users' product opinions. This paper explores course instructor use, course promotion, and bibliographic grading of automatically generated citations to enhance advocacy and instruction of these services.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Sue Stockdale

The purpose of this paper is to explore what training professionals can learn from motor sport driving instructors by modelling how they provide instruction to novices in

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore what training professionals can learn from motor sport driving instructors by modelling how they provide instruction to novices in high-performance vehicles during experience days at Silverstone Race Circuit, England.

Design/methodology/approach

Using neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) modelling techniques, three instructors were interviewed about how they provide effective instruction. The results highlight their cognitive and behavioural patterns that enable them to achieve high levels of performance in a high-risk environment.

Findings

The results highlighted how instructors are highly effective in being able to put a novice driver at ease prior to driving; and in communicating effectively with the novice driver in-car whilst on the circuit, so that they achieve more than they imagined was possible.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst the researcher had the opportunity to experience being driven around a race circuit with one of the instructors to get a sense of the environment being described, there was not the chance to observe the instructor “in action” with novice drivers at the wheel.

Practical implications

The key implication is the importance of the pre-event stage of a training course that provides the opportunity for an instructor to gauge the learners and build trust.

Originality/value

This paper provides originality in how it explores the cognitive and behavioural aspects of delivering instruction in an environment that can be translated into the workplace.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2021

Ahmad S. Haider and Saleh Al-Salman

The study aims to probe into university instructors' reactions to adopting the remote online learning model brought by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to probe into university instructors' reactions to adopting the remote online learning model brought by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The study investigates the instructors' perspectives, in the humanities and science classes, on the effectiveness of the emergency remote teaching (ERT) compared to face-to-face teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for the study were compiled from the responses of 127 instructors representing two private universities in middle and northern Jordan. The sample included 66 faculty members in the humanities and 61 in the sciences. The instructors' responses were elicited through a Likert-type questionnaire consisting of 20 items.

Findings

The present study's findings have shown that online instruction is becoming more common despite the presence of some major challenges facing instructors. The results showed that the e-learning system seems to better suit the humanities courses compared to the sciences courses. The findings also showed that faculty members in the humanities are more satisfied with the effectiveness of the assessment tools utilized in the online courses than their colleagues in the sciences. In addition, humanities e-courses seem to provide a more interactive learning environment than e-courses in the sciences.

Practical implications

More training for instructors on how to design online course syllabi to ensure effective delivery is needed. Instructors need to develop ways to encourage students to interact in virtual e-classes to the same level as the on-ground classes. Instructors also need to adopt the “blended learning” system as a transitional stage before switching completely to online learning.

Originality/value

Different studies have investigated how COVID-19 has impacted education. The current study brings to light the perspectives of the Jordanian teaching staff on transitioning to ERT during the COVID-19 crisis taking into account the differences between humanities and sciences classes.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Hugo A. Macias, Ruth Alejandra Patiño-Jacinto and Maria-Fanny Castro

This paper aims to contribute to the emerging literature on accounting education in the COVID-19 context. It proposes expanding the literature in its methodological…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the emerging literature on accounting education in the COVID-19 context. It proposes expanding the literature in its methodological, geographical and conceptual components.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a qualitative study that used a survey as the method. A total of 122 instructors answered the survey from 22 accounting programmes offered in 11 Colombian cities. The dialogic education model of Paulo Freire is the framework for analysis.

Findings

The accounting instructors’ response was to move from face-to-face classrooms to online classrooms, using widely known platforms. The instructors quickly learned to use tools that enabled new dialogue mechanisms with the students. The result was, paradoxically, closer communication at a distance.

Research limitations/implications

The COVID-19 lockdown accelerated the changes in teaching, learning, contextualisation, use of “new” technologies and, above all, practising Freirian dialogue. There is a need to research longer periods and use more data collection and analysis tools.

Practical implications

Evidence of how to teach accounting en masse from online classrooms in a developing country could accelerate the expansion of virtual accounting programmes.

Social implications

The new context allows increasing the number of students because it does not require travel to large cities.

Originality/value

This paper makes three contributions to the literature on accounting education in the COVID-19 context as follows: it describes the phenomenon in Colombia, a context little studied in the international accounting literature; transcends autoethnographic studies, as it is based on a qualitative survey of national scope and analyses the phenomenon based on Paulo Freire’s complete model, which includes context, educational process design and action process.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2021

Holly Chiu, William Hampton-Sosa and Tomas Lopez-Pumarejo

Instructors had to adapt to the online teaching environment after the higher education institutions were closed due to the pandemic. The authors surveyed and interviewed…

Abstract

Instructors had to adapt to the online teaching environment after the higher education institutions were closed due to the pandemic. The authors surveyed and interviewed instructors to understand how the quality of instructional technologies affected compatibility and psychological availability, which further affected their online teaching satisfaction and online teaching intention. The results showed that both information quality and service quality were positively associated with compatibility, while system quality was positively associated with psychological availability. Also, both compatibility and psychological availability were positively associated with online teaching satisfaction. Compatibility and online teaching satisfaction were associated with online teaching intention. The results from both open-ended questions and in-depth interviews provide support to the quantitative model and present a more complete picture of what instructors experienced during the lockdown.

Details

Work from Home: Multi-level Perspectives on the New Normal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-662-9

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Book part
Publication date: 10 January 2014

Learner-centered interactions determine the look and feel of online courses, influencing the way learners experience them. In this chapter we investigate considerations…

Abstract

Learner-centered interactions determine the look and feel of online courses, influencing the way learners experience them. In this chapter we investigate considerations related to three types of interactions: learner–content, learner–instructor, and learner–learner. Learners interact with content through the course structure and layout. They also interact with peers who may be cast in the role of community members, there to provide social support, or they may be more prominently cast as information providers and/or collaborators. The learner is at the center of both content and peer interactions. Instructor interactions set expectations for learners and facilitate learner interactions with content and peers. Instructors are instrumental forces in bringing about connections between learners, enabling the social presence necessary for collaboration. Instructor interaction may also be relational, enabling individualized connections between learners and the instructor. Redesign decisions center on creating a course structure that fits the learner and content and results in a satisfying course experience. We use the power of metaphor to bring into focus the most relevant considerations. In the end, we illustrate the redesign of a single course through the lens of three separate metaphors to demonstrate how metaphor shapes the process, bringing together design and interaction decisions to create unique and elegant course designs.

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2012

Bill N. Schwartz and Alan A. Cherry

We describe an innovative course whose purpose is to expose business students who are not accounting majors to the importance of accounting in the corporate world. We…

Abstract

We describe an innovative course whose purpose is to expose business students who are not accounting majors to the importance of accounting in the corporate world. We achieve this purpose by devoting most of the class time to speakers who work in the “real, global world,” such as auditors, corporate executives, and business journalists. Students do not prepare journal entries or financial statements. Rather, they listen to presentations by a variety of individuals, ask them questions, write reflections of each presentation, and do a term project focusing on a real corporation's accounting issues. The course structure has been successful at helping students gain an appreciation of the importance of accounting in the business world they soon will be entering. The course also helps students to develop critical skills, including attentive listening, asking questions (as opposed to only answering them), reflective ability, analytical ability, and writing skills. Student feedback has been a critical component to the continuous improvement in the course.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-757-4

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2020

Alex Rockey, Lorna Gonzalez, Megan Eberhardt-Alstot and Margaret Merrill

Connectedness is essential for student success in online learning. By projecting themselves as real people through video, instructors support connectedness. In this…

Abstract

Connectedness is essential for student success in online learning. By projecting themselves as real people through video, instructors support connectedness. In this chapter, researchers apply the theory of social presence (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000) to case studies from two public higher education institutions: a four-year university and a large research university. Analysis identifies video as a humanizing element of online courses. Findings suggest video could be used in a variety of ways (e.g., video lectures, synchronous office hours, weekly overview videos), and no single use of video was perceived to be more or less effective in developing social presence and humanizing the learning experience. However, participants especially perceived connectedness when video was used in a variety of ways. Students from the second case study validated a perception of connectedness to the instructor that faculty in our first case study hoped to achieve. However, one instructor’s perception of disconnect illustrates that video is just one of several pedagogical practices necessary to create a satisfying learning experience for both students and instructors. While video is not the only way to establish social presence, findings suggest video is an effective practice toward creating a humanized and connected online learning community.

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Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-035-7

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2010

N. Sharon Hill and Karen Wouters

E-learning programs exist in a wide variety of formats. Without a framework for distinguishing between different e-learning programs, it is a challenge for researchers to…

Abstract

E-learning programs exist in a wide variety of formats. Without a framework for distinguishing between different e-learning programs, it is a challenge for researchers to compare their effectiveness or identify characteristics of e-learning that contribute to learning effectiveness. Based on general theories of learning, we develop a typology that compares e-learning programs in terms of the nature of the learning interactions they provide for learners in three dimensions: degree of interaction, learner control of interactions, and informational value of interactions. The typology dimensions apply to learner–instructor, learner–learner, and learner–instructional material interactions. We also discuss important theoretical implications of the typology. First, we show the utility of the typology for comparing the effectiveness of different e-learning programs. Second, we apply the typology dimensions to develop a theoretical framework for e-learning research that provides a foundation for examining factors that influence learning effectiveness in an e-learning program. The framework identifies e-learning program characteristics, learner characteristics, and contextual factors that impact learning effectiveness in different e-learning environments. It also shows how the typology dimensions align with learning goals to influence learning effectiveness.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-126-9

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