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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Farshid Navissi and Vic Naiker

Prior studies examining the relation between the shareholdings by institutional investors and firm value have produced mixed results. These studies have assumed that a…

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Abstract

Purpose

Prior studies examining the relation between the shareholdings by institutional investors and firm value have produced mixed results. These studies have assumed that a linear relation exists between corporate value and institutional shareholdings. The purpose of this study is to further investigate the nature of this relationship and by partitioning institutional investors into institutions that have appointed a representative to the board of directors of the firms in which they have a block investment and institutions with a similar holding but without a representative on the board of directors.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a sample of 123 firms with available financial and institutional ownership data. A cross‐sectional regression analysis is used to test the relation between corporate value and institutional ownership with and without board representation.

Findings

The results of the study suggest that share ownership by investors with board representation is positively related to the value of the firm at lower levels of ownership. However, as the share ownership increases, the impact on the value of the firm becomes negative, giving rise to a non‐linear relation. The extent of shareholding by institutions without board representation, on the other hand, is not related to the value of the firm.

Research limitations/implications

The findings show that institutions with board representation have greater incentives to monitor management, and therefore their presence should have a positive influence on firm value. However, at high levels of ownership, institutional investors with board representation may induce boards of directors to make sub‐optimal decisions.

Originality/value

The study provides a deeper understanding of the relationship between firm value and institutional ownership. That is, the effect of shareholding by institutions with board representation is likely to have a non‐linear relation with firm value.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Book part
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Narjess Boubakri, Jean-Claude Cosset and Hyacinthe Y. Somé

Institutional investors have increasingly gained importance since the early 1990s. The assets under management in these funds have increased threefold since 1990 to reach…

Abstract

Institutional investors have increasingly gained importance since the early 1990s. The assets under management in these funds have increased threefold since 1990 to reach more than US$45 trillion in 2005, including over US$20 trillion in equity (Ferreira & Matos, 2008). Further, the value of institutional investors' assets represents roughly 162.6% of the OECD gross domestic product in 2005 (Gonnard, Kim, & Ynesta, 2008). Given the magnitude of institutional investors' holdings relative to the world market capitalization, challenging questions on the economic role of these investors have been raised. One such question concerns their impact on the stability of stock markets. On the one hand, active strategies of buying and selling shares by these investors may contribute to moving stock prices away from their fundamental values. On the other hand, if all institutional investors react to the same information in a timely manner, they are in fact helping to increase market efficiency by speeding up the adjustment of prices to new fundamentals (for competing theories on the role of institutional investors, see, e.g., Lakonishok, Shleifer, & Vishny, 1992). This view of institutional investors as “efficiency drivers” generated considerable debate for many years (see, e.g., Ferreira & Laux, 2007; French & Roll, 1986).

Details

Institutional Investors in Global Capital Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-243-2

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2014

Abdullah A. Alshwer and Edward Levitas

This study empirically examines the relationship between institutional ownership and innovation activity in the unique setting of the clinical trials for US…

Abstract

This study empirically examines the relationship between institutional ownership and innovation activity in the unique setting of the clinical trials for US biopharmaceutical companies. We used multiple statistical techniques in the period from 1990 through 2006 for firms in the biopharmaceutical industry to examine this relationship. Contrary to the widely believed relationship discussed in the literature, our findings suggest that institutional investors vary in their reactions to innovative progress. Specifically, we find that institutional investors with a long-term investment horizon (i.e., dedicated owners) increase their holdings of a firm’s equity as the number of the firm’s products increases in phases I and II of FDA clinical trials. These findings are robust for heteroskedasticity and autocorrelation as well as for different operationalizations of the change of institutional ownership.

Details

Finance and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-493-0

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Lili Ding, Zhongchao Zhao and Lei Wang

In order to further understand the research status and prospect, the purpose of this paper is to adopt a novel method in the research field of institutional investor to…

Abstract

Purpose

In order to further understand the research status and prospect, the purpose of this paper is to adopt a novel method in the research field of institutional investor to depict the knowledge structure and the evolution path over the past three decades.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the 4,194 records retrieved from Web of Science, Citespace combined with VOSviewer are employed to perform visualized analysis.

Findings

The results reveal that the number of published articles of research on institutional investor has an exponential growth. Although the United States is the most significant contributor with more publications compared with other countries, Malaysia and Nigeria show higher centrality in the research network worldwide. Furthermore, “shareholder activism”, “corporate governance”, “global convergence”, “corporate reporting regulation” and “individual investor” are the largest five knowledge clusters. “Media coverage”, “corporate social responsibility” and “stock price crash risk” are the latest three knowledge clusters. Moreover, “governance worldwide”, “institutional character”, “dynamic information environment”, “investment patterns” and “sustainable development” are the potential extended research fields in the future.

Originality/value

This research helps the scholars and participants to capture the knowledge structure of research on institutional investors and to develop a reference to future opportunities.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Nathalie Del Vecchio and Carine Girard

Purpose – This chapter presents the results of an exploratory study carried out on activist institutional investor strategies. It aims to identify the…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter presents the results of an exploratory study carried out on activist institutional investor strategies. It aims to identify the way in which different types of institutional investors are reacting to new institutional pressures in the French context.

Design/methodology/approach – Our methodology is based on a series of semi-directive interviews, combined with additional relevant data.

Findings – The interpretation of results makes use of institutional theory, more specifically the work of Oliver (1991). Our study shows that active institutional investors may opt for different responses when confronted with new institutional pressures, and that these responses would seem to depend on antecedents underlined by Ryan and Schneider (2002), which in turn depend on the nature of their business relationships with the firm in which they invest. Whereas pressure-sensitive investors (such as banks and insurance companies) generally adopt acquiescence responses, pressure-resistant investors (such as pension funds and investment funds) pursue joint strategies of co-optation, influence or control with key actors such as local and international proxy advisors and French investor associations. Acting conjointly, certain pressure-resistant investors are often considered as institutional entrepreneurs in that they initiate changes and actively participate in the implementation of new norms in the field of shareholder activism in the French context. In parallel to this ongoing professionalization, other pressure-resistant investors such as activist hedge funds seem to lack sufficient legitimate power to be effective.

Originality/value – This chapter illustrates that the level of institutional investor activism depends largely on the relevant national legal framework. It also shows how institutional investor coalitions take advantage of new institutional pressures to enhance their legitimacy or increase the effectiveness of their action.

Details

Institutional Investors’ Power to Change Corporate Behavior: International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-771-9

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Book part
Publication date: 30 March 2017

Marc Steffen Rapp and Oliver Trinchera

In this paper, we explore an extensive panel data set covering more than 4,000 listed firms in 16 European countries to study the effects of shareholder protection on…

Abstract

In this paper, we explore an extensive panel data set covering more than 4,000 listed firms in 16 European countries to study the effects of shareholder protection on ownership structure and firm performance. We document a negative firm-level correlation between shareholder protection and ownership concentration. Differentiating between shareholder types, we find that this pattern is mainly driven by strategic investors. In contrast, we find a positive correlation between shareholder protection and block ownership of institutional investors, in particular when we restrict the analysis to independent institutional investors. Finally, we find that independent institutional investors are positively associated with firm valuation as measured by Tobin’s Q. The opposite applies for strategic investors. Overall, our results are consistent with the view that (i) high shareholder protection and (ii) limited ownership by strategic investors make small investors and investors interested in security returns more confident in their investments.

Details

Global Corporate Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-165-4

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Article
Publication date: 22 September 2020

Patrick Velte and Jörn Obermann

This paper aims to analyse whether and how different types of institutional investors influence shareholder proposal initiations, say-on-pay (SOP) votes and management…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse whether and how different types of institutional investors influence shareholder proposal initiations, say-on-pay (SOP) votes and management compensation from a sustainability perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the principal-agent theory, the authors conduct a structured literature review and evaluate 40 empirical-quantitative studies on that topic.

Findings

The traditional assumption of homogeneity within institutional investors, which is in line with the principal–agent theory, has to be questioned. Only special types of investors (e.g. with long-term and non-financial orientations and active institutions) run an intensive monitoring strategy, and thus initiate shareholder proposals, discipline managers by higher SOP dissents and prevent excessive management compensation.

Research limitations/implications

A detailed analysis of institutional investor types is needed in future empirical analyses. In view of the current debate on climate change policy, future research could analyse in more detail the impact of institutional investor types on proxy voting, SOP and (sustainable) management compensation.

Practical implications

With regard to the increased shareholder activism and regulations on SOP and management compensation since the 2007/2008 financial crisis, firms should be aware of the monitoring role of institutional investors and should analyse their specific ownership nature (time- and content-driven and as well as range of activity).

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, this is the first literature review with a clear focus on institutional investor range and nature, shareholder proposal initiation, SOP and management compensation (reporting) from a sustainability viewpoint. The authors explain the main variables that have been included in research, stress the limitations of this work and offer useful recommendations for future research studies.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2020

Woei Chyuan Wong

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of conversion to REIT status by former listed property companies in the United Kingdom on the level of institutional

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of conversion to REIT status by former listed property companies in the United Kingdom on the level of institutional ownership during the period of 2007–2016.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an event study framework to track the change in institutional ownership three years before and after a REIT conversion event. This event study approach circumvents the sample selection bias issue associated with the conversion event wherein the decision to convert to REIT is likely to be endogenous.

Findings

Panel regression analysis reveals that changing to REIT status led to a 12.8 and 15.2% increase in institutional ownership and number of institutional investors, respectively. The first order of priority in institutional investors' investment in REIT shares is their preference for liquidity. Further analysis shows that institutional investors changed their preferences towards characteristics associated with systematic risk, firm age and liquidity after the conversion event by becoming less averse to firm-specific risk, placing more emphasis on firm age and less emphasis on systematic risk and liquidity.

Practical implications

Overall, conversion to REIT status helps increase former property companies' investor base, which is in line with the regulator's aim to open up the property market to a wide range of investors through the introduction of a REIT regime. Findings from this paper also have policy implications for countries that are considering a REIT regime for their capital market and existing REIT regimes without a formal conversion mechanism.

Originality/value

This paper offers, for the first time, evidence on 1) how conversion to REITs influences firms' institutional ownership and 2) the determinants of converted REITs' institutional ownership.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Shafat Maqbool and Nasir Zamir

The research on the role of corporate social responsibility in investors' decision process has proliferated over the past few decades. This paper aims to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

The research on the role of corporate social responsibility in investors' decision process has proliferated over the past few decades. This paper aims to explore the mediating role of financial performance in the relationship between corporate social responsibility and institutional investors.

Design/methodology/approach

Panel regression was performed on a sample of 29 commercial banks nine years from 2009 to 2017.

Findings

The initial findings of the study show that that corporate social responsibility has a positive and significant impact on institutional investors. However, when the interaction term (financial performance) was incorporated, the relationship between CSR and institutional turns out to be neutral. The study concludes that financial performance plays a pivotal role in the selection of investment avenues.

Originality/value

In Indian context, there is a dearth of research work which studies the impact of sustainable practices on investors' decision process. This topic has received wider attention but lacks insights from developing countries, like India. This article presents a new approach to verify the relationship through the mediating variable (financial performance).

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Syed Qasim Shah, Izlin Ismail and Aidial Rizal bin Shahrin

The purpose of this study is to empirically test the role of heterogeneous investor’s, i.e. institutional investors, individuals and insiders in deteriorating market integrity.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to empirically test the role of heterogeneous investor’s, i.e. institutional investors, individuals and insiders in deteriorating market integrity.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is conducted by examining the participants of 244 market manipulation cases of East Asian emerging and developed financial markets for the period of 2001–2016. The empirical analysis is conducted using panel logistic regression.

Findings

The results show that firms with higher institutional ownership are most likely to be manipulated in both markets. Insiders are potential manipulators in developed markets and deteriorate market integrity. In contrast, individual investors behave differently in both markets. In developed markets, firms with high individual ownership are less likely to be manipulated while in emerging markets, firms with individual ownership are more prone to manipulation because of substantial participation by individual investors which invites manipulative practices. Additionally, the authors found that firms with a higher proportion of passive institutional investors are less likely to be manipulated in emerging markets.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the existing literature by identifying the potential manipulators in the financial markets who deteriorate market integrity with the additional focus of subdivision of institutional investors as active institutional investors and passive institutional investor. The findings are helpful for regulators in designing policies to ensure market integrity and to enforce the role of institutional investors and insiders.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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