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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 December 2022

Alicia Orea-Giner, Ana Muñoz-Mazón, Teresa Villacé-Molinero and Laura Fuentes-Moraleda

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the future of the implementation of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies in services experience provided by cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the future of the implementation of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies in services experience provided by cultural institutions (e.g. museums, exhibition halls and cultural centres) from experts’, cultural tourists’ and users’ point of view under the Industry 5.0 approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted using a qualitative approach, which was based on the analysis of the contents obtained from two roundtable discussions with experts and cultural tourists and users. A thematic analysis using NVivo was done to the data obtained.

Findings

From a futuristic Industry 5.0 approach, AI is considered to be more than a tool – it as an integral part of the entire experience. AI aids in connecting cultural institutions with users and is beneficial since it allows the institutions to get to know the users better and provide a more integrated and immersive experience. Furthermore, AI is critical in establishing a community and nurturing it daily.

Originality/value

The most important contribution of this research is the theoretical model focused on the user experience and AI application in services experiences of museums and cultural institutions from an Industry 5.0 approach. This model includes the visitors’ and managers’ points of view through the following dimensions: the pre-experience, experience and post-experience. This model is focused on human–AI coworking (HAIC) in museums and cultural institutions.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2022

Josephine Namugumya, John Chrysostom Kigozi Munene, Sam Samuel Mafabi and James Kagaari

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of systems adaptability in the relationship between emotional intelligence and talent management in tertiary…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of systems adaptability in the relationship between emotional intelligence and talent management in tertiary institutions in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the study purpose, the authors used responses from 91 tertiary institutions following a cross-sectional survey design. Partial least structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) was used to analyse the data and done at an institutional level.

Findings

The results reveal that systems adaptability plays a full mediating role in the relationship between emotional intelligence and talent management in tertiary institutions as it accounts for 96.68% variance.

Research limitations/implications

Managing talented employees is not a snapshot process, yet the authors used a cross-sectional design. This paper is limited in this regard. Also, talent management in this paper is only explained by emotional intelligence and systems adaptability.

Practical implications

Talent management is explained by emotional intelligence and systems adaptability, which are metaphors of emotional intelligence and complex adaptive system theories. The authors also add to theory by establishing a fully mediating role of systems adaptability between emotional intelligence and talent management.

Originality/value

This paper establishes the mediating role of systems adaptability in the relationship between emotional intelligence and talent management in tertiary institutions.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2022

Chwee-Ming Tee and Teng-Tenk Melissa Teoh

This cross-border study’s main purpose is to examine whether there is a significant association between political institutions and the cost of debt. In addition, it also…

Abstract

Purpose

This cross-border study’s main purpose is to examine whether there is a significant association between political institutions and the cost of debt. In addition, it also investigates whether this association is moderated by the country’s corruption levels.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a unique cross-border data set comprising 45,848 firms from 117 countries from 2002 to 2017 to investigate these research questions. Further, the authors use the two-stage least squares method to mitigate issues of endogeneity.

Findings

This study finds that political institutions are significantly associated with cost of debt. Specifically, the cost of debt is lower in countries with stronger democratic institutions, smaller government bureaucracies and higher adherence to the rule of law. Further, this association is strengthened by low corruption levels.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights into the relationship between political institutions and the cost of debt. Overall, the results reveal that democratic institutions, government bureaucracy and the rule of law are significantly associated with cost of debt. This association is stronger in countries with low levels of corruption and consistent with Transparency’s International notion that accountability and transparency by government political institutions promote sustainable economic growth.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 September 2022

Olena Khlystova, Yelena Kalyuzhnova and Maksim Belitski

Institutional trust is vital for social and economic activity and crucial in reducing uncertainty for entrepreneurs and society. To shed light on the role of institutional…

Abstract

Purpose

Institutional trust is vital for social and economic activity and crucial in reducing uncertainty for entrepreneurs and society. To shed light on the role of institutional trust on productive entrepreneurial activity, this paper analyses the impact of six urban entrepreneurial ecosystems (EEs) using the contexts of the transition economies of Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central Asia. This study aims to pursue the research question: what role does institutional trust play in the relationship between formal institutions and productive entrepreneurship in the EEs of transition economies? This paper aims to posit that the development and enforcement of formal institutions and institutional trust enhance productive entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors apply a mixed-method approach. The authors’ dataset includes 657 respondents (ecosystem stakeholders) from six city-level entrepreneurial ecosystems in the transition economies of Georgia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan, as well as 51 semi-structured interviews from EE representative stakeholders to examine the validity of the findings.

Findings

Institutional trust in many cities has been negatively affected by institutionalised corruption and continuous non-transparent reforms, furthering prior research in developing and transition economies. The authors’ findings suggest that institutional trust can be investigated not as a country phenomenon but as a regional phenomenon extending prior research towards understanding the institutional trust – productive entrepreneurship research domain at the city EE level.

Originality/value

The authors apply the institutional trust perspective to the EEs in cities in order to examine how institutional trust affects productive entrepreneurship in challenging institutional environments. The authors contribute to the literature on institutions and entrepreneurship by using a mixed-method analysis to examine the relationship between formal institutions and institutional trust in the context of EEs in transition economies.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2022

Khusboo Srivastava and Somesh Dhamija

This study intends to build up a thorough understanding of social factors that largely influence students’ decision-making to opt institution for higher studies in India.

Abstract

Purpose

This study intends to build up a thorough understanding of social factors that largely influence students’ decision-making to opt institution for higher studies in India.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive research follows two sequential phases consisting of the literature review to identify social factors and validate the factors through the questionnaire method. Factor analysis was applied to identify the various factors that influence the student’s institution choice.

Findings

The research work explores and identified four factors and their associated attributes that impact students’ decision-making to opt institution for higher studies. It was found that the career advisor influence variable has the highest level of variance, followed by societal norms, social platform and cohort influence.

Research limitations/implications

The present study is limited to social factors only. Therefore, many other determinants which may influence the student’s decision-making to opt the institute for higher studies remain unaddressed in this study.

Practical implications

The findings of the study can guide the institutions' admission management in underpinning the acceptance of social factors to observe their influence on student’s choice of an institution. An important implication is the identification of career advisor influence as the strongest social factor which may bridge the student's career fit in the institution and social platform influence which may help higher education institutions to redesign their marketing strategies to augment students’ enrolment.

Originality/value

This study provides insight into the important role of social factors that impact the student's decision-making regarding institution choice in India.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Rachel Fleishman, Dror Walk and Gad Mizrahi

As part of the evaluation of an experimental programme of surveillance of institutions for the semi‐independent and frail elderly using the RAF method, an examination was…

378

Abstract

As part of the evaluation of an experimental programme of surveillance of institutions for the semi‐independent and frail elderly using the RAF method, an examination was made of the licensing status, quality of care, and completeness of the surveillance process. Included in the examination were 126 institutions which underwent the surveillance process between 1990 and 1993. Aims to investigate whether the RAF method of surveillance was being implemented in a professional and uniform manner. Concludes that surveyors’ recommendations to grant or not grant a licence were usually based on findings about the quality of care. Nevertheless, in order to reinforce the relationship between licensing and quality of care, it was suggested that surveyors be given clear criteria of quality on which to base their recommendations regarding conditional licensing. It was found that the surveillance process is indeed implemented uniformly in long‐term care institutions of varying quality.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Olu Fadahunsi

Management institutions in Africa experience socio‐economic problems far worse than any which exist in the Western World. Solutions of the past are no longer relevant and…

Abstract

Management institutions in Africa experience socio‐economic problems far worse than any which exist in the Western World. Solutions of the past are no longer relevant and are therefore inadequate. The IMF/World Bank's prescription for economic recovery in African countries seems to be having little effect. What is being done, and what should be done, to train staff in African management institutions to improve the situation?

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Edward A. Baryla and Douglas Dotterweich

This paper uses institutional characteristics and regional economic data to determine if institutional mission may help drive non‐resident undergraduate enrollment.

868

Abstract

Purpose

This paper uses institutional characteristics and regional economic data to determine if institutional mission may help drive non‐resident undergraduate enrollment.

Design/methodology/approach

A two‐stage least squares regression models is employed on 180 Doctoral, 333 Comprehensive, and 501 Baccalaureate higher education institutions to determine if there is a correlation between non‐resident enrollment and tuition for each of the separate mission‐based classifications.

Findings

The study finds a significant positive correlation between non‐resident undergraduate enrollment and tuition for both doctoral and baccalaureate institutions. There is no significant correlation between non‐resident enrollment and tuition for comprehensive institutions.

Research limitations/implications

Suggests that non‐resident undergraduate students are attracted to both larger flagship institutions, as well as to smaller institutions that are almost entirely focused on undergraduate instruction. Comprehensive institutions do not generally experience this phenomenon; however, the more selective schools within this category are also attractive to non‐resident students.

Originality/value

Attracting non‐resident students is an important issue for a higher education institution. This research article presents tantalizing evidence that institutional mission may be a factor in non‐resident enrollment. This may allow a higher education institution to garner excess returns when pricing non‐resident tuition, and in addition it may allow for some leeway in pricing resident tuition.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Myroslava Hladchenko

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the comparative analysis of the Balanced Scorecards of four higher education institutions and aims to define the general framework…

7772

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the comparative analysis of the Balanced Scorecards of four higher education institutions and aims to define the general framework of the Balanced Scorecard for the higher education institution which concerns: the structure and elements of the Balanced Scorecard; development of the Balanced Scorecards on the different levels of the management system of the higher education institution; definition of the main functions of the Balanced Scorecard which it performs in the process of the strategic management of the German higher education institutions. Balanced Scorecard is analyzed as a strategic management system that translates a higher education institution’s strategy into a comprehensive set of performance measures that provides a framework for a strategic measurement and management system.

Design/methodology/approach

The comparative content analysis of the Balanced Scorecards of one Austrian and three German higher education institutions – Johanes Gutenberg University Mainz, Münster University of Applied Sciences (Fachhochschule Münster), Cologne University of Applied Sciences (Fachhochschule Köln), Montan University Leoben.

Findings

Using a comparative analysis of the Balanced Scorecards of four higher education institutions this paper argues that Balanced Scorecard provides a systemic view of the strategy of a higher education institution. It ensures a full complex framework for implementation and controlling of the strategy and sets a basis for further learning in the process of the strategic management of the higher education institution according to the scheme “plan-do-check-act”.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides a basis for the substantial further work on the development of the general framework of the Balanced Scorecard for the higher education institution.

Practical implications

The framework presented in this paper can be used as the basis for the development of general framework of the Balanced Scorecard of the higher education institution.

Social implications

The framework presented in this paper can be used as the basis for the development of general framework of the Balanced Scorecard of the higher education institution.

Originality/value

This paper indicates the particularities of the structure and elements of the Balanced Scorecard, its development in the different levels of the management system of the higher education institution.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2016

Michael A. Hitt

Country institutions have become of heightened importance for firms’ international strategies in recent years. Herein, I review the reasons for the growing importance of…

2473

Abstract

Purpose

Country institutions have become of heightened importance for firms’ international strategies in recent years. Herein, I review the reasons for the growing importance of institutional environments and examine how they influence the international strategies of multinational enterprises (MNEs). There have been significant changes in the global, economic and competitive landscapes in recent years. These changes are examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Three critical and interrelated changes in the global competitive landscape are identified. They include (1) more interconnected (interdependent) national economies, (2) a significantly larger number of multinational firms and (3) growing importance of emerging economies (and their MNEs). These changes have increased the importance of countries institutional environments. Country institutions, both formal institutions (codified and explicit rules and standards that shape behavior) and informal institutions (Shared norms that guide cohesive behaviors) are examined. I explain the influences of institutional complexity, institutional distance and geographic regions on firms’ international strategies.

Findings

Research has shown that both culture (informal institution) and formal institutions are interrelated and affect firms’ strategies. And, while specific institutions such as intellectual property protection (law and enforcement) are important, the collective influence of institutions has a critical influence on firms’ international strategies. And, institutions are multilevel (national, regional and local-municipal). The institutional complexity (combined effects of multiple institutions and their diversity) is carefully considered in executives’ strategic decisions. When firms consider entering a new foreign market, they also consider the institutional distance between the home and host countries. The differences in culture and in formal institutions compose the institutional distance and affect whether and how firms enter these markets. Greater institutional distance contributes to the liabilities of foreignness the challenges of which must be managed effectively to succeed in the new market. And the effects of institutional distance are asymmetric depending on whether the firm’s home country institutions are stronger/more developed or weaker/less developed than the host country institutions. Finally, many firms follow regional international strategies in which they invest in selected regions of the world. Recent research suggests firms enter regions that have attractive institutional profiles and engage in institutional arbitrage across the countries in those regions.

Research limitations/implications

This essay provides the base for additional research by identifying a number of important research questions on institutions and international strategy.

Originality/value

This essay highlights the importance of institutions for firms’ strategies. Understanding institutions and their influence contributes to more effective executives’ strategic decisions and more effective national and international policies.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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