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1 – 10 of over 166000
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2022

Radha Yadav, Atul Shiva and Sumit Narula

This study aims to explore various determinants of university attractiveness and its relationship with sustainable institutes. Further, the study examines the mediating…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore various determinants of university attractiveness and its relationship with sustainable institutes. Further, the study examines the mediating role of perceived student support and sense of belongingness on the relationship between university attractiveness and sustainable institutes.

Design/methodology/approach

The data analysis was conducted with 637 responses from the students from private universities located in the northern region of India. Variance based partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was applied in the study to investigate the proposed conceptual model on sustainable higher institutions. Additionally, by applying PLS Predict, the predictive relevance of sustainable institutions with important and performing constructs was found out.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that university attractiveness plays a critical role in enhancing perceived student support, and it has a direct and significant impact on developing sustainable institutes. Further, students’ sense of belongingness is expressed as significant mediator between university attractiveness and sustainable institutes. The predictive relevance of the study was reported to be high. Most important indicators of university attractiveness were found to be teaching, research and publications, branding and promotion, and diversity in courses offered by the private universities.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual model under study can be investigated with a moderating effect of private and government universities in future. Additionally, the role of additional variables in online scenario under current pandemic situation can be assessed through the model used in this study. Future research can be done by using qualitative analysis through thematic analysis and sentiment analysis of students in higher education institutes.

Originality/value

The present study is the first to explore the mediating relationship of perceived student support and sense of belongingness with university attractiveness and sustainable institutes. The conceptual framework can prove to be important for education specialists, administrators of education institutes at university level and policymakers. The study offers effective ideas for policymakers to bring sustainability in education sector in near future especially in emerging economies and attain sustainable development goals.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2014

Jochen Gläser, Enno Aljets, Eric Lettkemann and Grit Laudel

In this article, we analyse how variations in organisational conditions for research affect researchers’ opportunities for changing individual-level or group-level…

Abstract

In this article, we analyse how variations in organisational conditions for research affect researchers’ opportunities for changing individual-level or group-level research programmes. We contrast three innovations that were developed in universities and public research institutes in Germany and the Netherlands, which enables comparisons both between organisational settings and between properties of innovations. Comparing the development of three innovations in the two types of organisations enables the identification of links between patterns of authority sharing at these organisations and the opportunities to develop innovations. On this basis, the distribution of opportunities to change research practices among researchers in the two countries can be established.

Details

Organizational Transformation and Scientific Change: The Impact of Institutional Restructuring on Universities and Intellectual Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-684-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2012

J. Kelly Tonsmeire, Kathy Blanc, Al Bertani, Susan Garton, Gary Whiteley, Lexie Domaradzki and Carol Kane

This chapter highlights the collaborative efforts of committed partners engaged in four distinct yet inter-related programs designed to build leadership capacity across…

Abstract

This chapter highlights the collaborative efforts of committed partners engaged in four distinct yet inter-related programs designed to build leadership capacity across schools serving rural Alaska. The Rural Alaska Principal Preparation and Support (RAPPS) program has built a comprehensive system of leadership development programs that develop aspiring leaders, induct and coach new principals, promote the professional learning of practicing principals, and support the school improvement efforts of the state education department. Each program is described in detail with special attention devoted to the unique elements of the program designs, including summer institutes; cohort models; distance learning offerings; targeted coaching; blended learning models using webinars; critical friends’ conversations; and a festival of ideas. Lessons learned are highlighted, and impact and evaluation results are also detailed.

Details

Successful School Leadership Preparation and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-322-4

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Rupak Chakravarty and Deepti Madaan

The purpose of this paper is to cite the statistical data reflecting the trends and tendencies in research activity undertaken by Chandigarh city affiliations. The period…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to cite the statistical data reflecting the trends and tendencies in research activity undertaken by Chandigarh city affiliations. The period under study is from 1964 to the first quarter of 2014. Scopus is the source of information retrieved. Various parameters like decade-wise growth of publications, publications of individual institutions, number of patents earned by each institute of Chandigarh under study, research productivity of top five authors of seven city-based institutes, document type, highly cited papers, research output of authors of parent institute vis-á-vis their affiliations with other institutes, collaborations at national and international levels have been taken into consideration for this paper. Institutes which have come up in the past 2-3 decades have also been contributing actively. An important finding of the paper undertaken is that foreign collaborations and foreign journals have remained the epicenter of the research activity. Chandigarh has emerged as a hub of academic and scholarly activity. It also reflects that the city-based research activity is also integrated into the global research activity.

Design/methodology/approach

The present paper reviews the publication output of Chandigarh city affiliations from 1964 to 2014. The publication data were procured from Scopus, which is an international multi-disciplinary bibliographical database covering 53m records, more than 20,000 titles and 5,000 publishers. It is a product of Elsevier and is the considered the world’s largest indexing and abstracting database and offers citation searching. Launched in 2004, it provides access to science–technology–medicine (STM) literature with a limited coverage of social science and arts and humanities. Database search was undertaken on May 22nd, 2014, and results were downloaded under various headings like year, author, number of publications, document type, affiliations and collaborations with other nations. The whole data were exported to MS-Excel format from Scopus database. Data of 160 authors were retrieved on the basis of at least one author affiliated to a research institution in Chandigarh. The paper was conducted by focussing on top seven institutes of Chandigarh engaged in diverse fields. These are Panjab University (PU), Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Govt. Medical College and Hospital (GMCH), Punjab Engineering College (PEC), University Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (UIPS), Institute of Microbial Technology (IMTECH) and Central Scientific Instruments Organization (CSIO). Although UIPS is an integral part of PU, Scopus has treated it as a separate institution and so have the researchers. The researchers have used simple percentile method to find out the growth in research output of these institutes in six decades covering the period from 1964 to the first quarter of 2014, collaborations with other nations and affiliations with other institutes. Taking into consideration the number of publications, their citations and h index, the researchers have tried to find out the most productive authors from these institutes. Although the research process in Panjab University was started early in 1926 as revealed by Scopus, to maintain the uniformity with the research process initiated by other city-based institutes, the authors have taken 1964 as the year of initiation of data analysis for writing this paper. Each city-based institute has to its credit research publications in more than 20 diverse subject areas. Due to this diversity, data could not be analyzed under subject areas. To study the research output of Chandigarh city affiliations for the past 50 years and the current year, the authors have divided the years into five decades and additional few months of 2014.

Findings

There has been a phenomenal growth in the research productivity of city-based institutes, which was nil or negligible from 1964 to 1983, except Panjab University and PGI. The research activity gained momentum with every passing decade. PGI and PU have emerged as frontrunners in research productivity, but at the same time, IMTECH and UIPS have also performed well on this front too. As compared to PGI and PU, which came up in 1962 and 1956 (Chandigarh), respectively, IMTECH and UIPS are of recent origin, that is, 1984 and 1994, respectively. In the first decade of its establishment, UIPS generated 27 per cent of its total research output. Not only this, the institute has fetched maximum number of patents (89) in just two decades and that too with 1,259 publications only. IMTECH has also been coming up with qualitative research since its establishment in 1984. It has to its credit 37 patents from 1,290 publications. Major research findings took the form of articles and that too in journals. Another remarkable feature of UIPS and IMTECH is that their publications have fetched maximum citations as compared to other institutes. Comparing all the seven institutes, the authors have concluded that the authors of Panjab University have made maximum affiliation with the authors of with other national and international institutes in generating research output. Panjab University tops the list of city-based institutes by collaborating with 97 different nations. PGI has taken second slot by collaborating with 88 countries. From a list of 100 collaborating nations, USA has emerged as the major collaborating nation. Chandigarh has emerged as an education hub. It has many institutes of repute in different domains. Consequently, the research scenario is very encouraging. Researchers have a vision and are active in exploring the emerging horizons as is evident from the paper. National and international collaborations also form the basis of growth of research productivity. Government should provide all round support and upgrade the existing infrastructure to enhance further the research output of the city.

Originality/value

Various bibliometric studies have also been conducted to know about the trends and patterns in the research publications. From a single institute, journal to a state, the analysis of research activity has become an area of focus. The present paper takes into account the research productivity in seven major academic institutes of Chandigarh, the city beautiful as revealed by Scopus.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2018

Svetlana V. Lobova, Igor A. Prodchenko, Tatiana M. Rogulenko, Svetlana V. Ponomareva and Victor V. Gorlov

The purpose of this chapter is to determine the basic institutes of well-balanced information economy and compile its institutional model.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to determine the basic institutes of well-balanced information economy and compile its institutional model.

Approach

The research methodology is based on the methods of the new institutional economic theory. The authors determine the most important qualitative characteristics of the innovational model of a well-balanced information economy and select social institutes that allow taking them into account and ensuring them during practical implementation of the model. The authors describe social institutes that are the basis of a well-balanced information economy and the process of their formation. The authors also use the method of modeling socio-economic phenomena and processes to compile the institutional model of a well-balanced information economy and the method of formalization of its graphic interpretation.

Findings

It is concluded that the basic institutes of the innovational model of a well-balanced information economy include the institutes of feedback collection and control and protection of information. These institutes ensure observation of the principles of implementation of this model and ensure its cyclic development and sustainability in the long-term.

Originality/Value

The presented institutional model of a well-balanced information economy harmonizes the interaction between all the participants of socio-economic relations and processes of information economy, including its state regulation, transition of new information into the category of existing (from product into resource), internal and external exchange of information, its usage, etc.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Jason Haines

In 1972, Mr Andreou became a member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants for England and Wales (The Institute). On 14th December 1993, the disciplinary committee of…

Abstract

In 1972, Mr Andreou became a member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants for England and Wales (The Institute). On 14th December 1993, the disciplinary committee of the Institute found him guilty of serious disciplinary charges and as a result he was excluded from membership. Mr Andreou wished to overturn this decision but failed to bring an internal appeal within 28 days, the time prescribed by the Institute's by‐law 85(c). Mr Andreou was refused an extension of time in which to appeal, being informed in a letter from the Institute that stated ‘The Institute had no discretion to extend the time limit’. Being unable to appeal, Mr Andreou then made an application for leave to apply for judicial review in order to challenge the vires of by‐law 85(c) and the decision of the Institute that it had no power to extend time. On 26th April 1995, Mr Andreou was granted leave by the Court of Appeal. He was also allowed to amend his application to include a claim for damages. However, he failed to enter a notice of motion within 14 days required by RSC Ord 53 r5(5). He then applied for an extension of time in which to enter his notice of motion. This was refused on the grounds of unjustified delay. The Court of Appeal dismissed his appeal against that decision but ordered that the claim continue as if it begun by writ pursuant to RSC Ord 53 r9(5). By amended notice the plaintiff applied for an order of certiori quashing the Institute's decision of 22nd February. A declaration that the by‐laws insofar as they imposed the 28‐day period for appeal without exception, were unlawful and damaging. The application was dismissed on the ground that the complaint was of a private character, notwithstanding it involved an examination of the Institute's by‐laws. The Institute appealed.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Article
Publication date: 17 March 2022

Samant Shant Priya, Vineet Jain, Meenu Shant Priya, Sushil Kumar Dixit and Gaurav Joshi

This study aims to examine which organisational and other factors can facilitate the adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) in Indian management institutes and their…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine which organisational and other factors can facilitate the adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) in Indian management institutes and their interrelationship.

Design/methodology/approach

To determine the factors influencing AI adoption, a synthesis-based examination of the literature was used. The interpretative structural modelling (ISM) method is used to determine the most effective factors among the identified ones and the inter-relationship among the factors, while the Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) method is used to analyse the cause-and-effect relationships among the factors in a quantitative manner. The approaches used in the analysis aid in understanding the relationship among the factors affecting AI adoption in management institutes of India.

Findings

This study concludes that leadership support plays the most significant role in the adoption of AI in Indian management institutes. The results from the DEMATEL analysis also confirmed the findings from the ISM and Matrice d’ Impacts croises- multiplication applique and classment (MICMAC) analyses. Remarkably, no linkage factor (unstable one) was reported in the research. Leadership support, technological context, financial consideration, organizational context and human resource readiness are reported as independent factors.

Practical implications

This study provides a listing of the important factors affecting the adoption of AI in Indian management institutes with their structural relationships. The findings provide a deeper insight about AI adoption. The study's societal implications include the delivery of better outcomes by Indian management institutes.

Originality/value

According to the authors, this study is a one-of-a-kind effort that involves the synthesis of several validated models and frameworks and uncovers the key elements and their connections in the adoption of AI in Indian management institutes.

Details

foresight, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Paul Bolger

Despite the potential for research institutes to advance interdisciplinary research on university campuses, There have been few studies on how interdisciplinary research…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the potential for research institutes to advance interdisciplinary research on university campuses, There have been few studies on how interdisciplinary research centres integrate multiple disciplines in practice, how they influence the collaborative behaviours of scientists and how they establish collaborative communities. This study aims to provide a deeper understanding of how interdisciplinary research is being enabled at research institutes and offers signposts for how research institutes can further embed interdisciplinarity within their units.

Design/methodology/approach

Within this study, 30 interviews were conducted with leadership and faculty within 4 sustainability research institutes in the USA exploring how research institutes support interdisciplinary research within their units. A thematic analysis on the interview data revealed themes on how research institutes are enabling interdisciplinary research within their organisations and universities.

Findings

The study highlights eight themes on how research institutes are, and can further, enable interdisciplinary research within their organisations and universities. Some of the themes are fully implemented within the research institutes, whilst others are more aspirational and highlight where institutes can create additional capability and capacity for interdisciplinary research within their units and universities.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst the study is limited to four major sustainability research institutes the findings will be applicable to all research centres and institutes attempting to create interdisciplinary research environments.

Practical implications

The study will be of particular interest to research institutes and university leadership who wish to cultivate a deeper culture of interdisciplinary research within their organisations.

Social implications

The advancement of inter- and transdisciplinary research within universities are seen by many academic institutions, expert groups and funding bodies as essential for solving wicked problems and grand challenges facing society. The findings of this paper will help universities increase their capacity for interdisciplinary research.

Originality/value

There are few comparable publications in terms of methodology, approach and focus on research institutes.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

Benjamin J. Lough

This paper aims to illustrate how dispersed institutes of social innovation operating as intermediary actors within higher education institutions (HEIs) may help overcome…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate how dispersed institutes of social innovation operating as intermediary actors within higher education institutions (HEIs) may help overcome many of the institutional bureaucracies and structures that inhibit social innovation in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews core conditions for social innovation, along with the opportunities, challenges and tensions that emerge as HEIs work to apply these conditions in practice. It then describes how dispersed institutes enact principles of decentralization, localization and collaboration in pursuit of social innovation.

Findings

Five main ways that dispersed institutes enable social innovation were identified in this review, including bridging academic–practice divides, enabling co-creation and co-production with users, facilitating experiential and co-curricular education, supporting interdisciplinary collaborations and generating customized and place-based solutions.

Practical implications

Findings suggest four strategies that HEIs can use to support dispersed institutes, including prioritizing social purpose organizations as institutional partners, incentivizing public engagement and collaboration, leveraging their convening power to strengthen global networks among dispersed institutes and using budgeting models that reflect the importance of creating both economic and social value.

Originality/value

Although innovation labs in HEIs have long been a feature of natural sciences and technology services, they are still comparatively new for the social sciences and humanities. This paper addresses a gap in the literature on the value contributed by dispersed institutes of social innovation operating within HEIs such as living labs, makerspaces, incubators and excubators, social innovation parks, cooperation accelerators and technology transfer offices.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 December 2020

Alka Pandita and Ravi Kiran

Our findings show that the academic culture is base for quality teaching and education delivery and it impacts employee experience through employee involvement in…

Abstract

Purpose

Our findings show that the academic culture is base for quality teaching and education delivery and it impacts employee experience through employee involvement in decision-making and employee engagement demonstrating benefits for universities such as increased employee attraction, higher retention, greater productivity and improved student service. Higher education institutions that offer development opportunities to their faculty are likely to have less turnover than those that do not. Globally tuned curriculum matching the expectation of students one hand and developing a conducive environment for implementing the changes on the other hand is the need of the hour. Branding and student employability needs the focus of policymakers, and it can highly impact the visibility of institute.

Design/methodology/approach

This research has been undertaken to examine the role of critical success factors (CSFs) for augmenting quality of higher education institutes in India. The aspects considered are: branding, employability, employee experience, student experience. The study tries to analyse their impact on overall performance. The results highlight that academic culture mediates between student experience and overall performance. The current research also indicates that academic culture mediates between employee experience and overall performance. Employee experience through academic culture emerges as a strongest predictor of overall performance. Student experience through academic culture emerges as another important predictor of overall performance. Employability was next to follow. The beta values were low for branding. The results highlight that for improving performance Indian higher educational institutes need to focus on branding. Implementing this model will enable educational institutions to focus on these predictors to boost overall performance and equip engineers with requisite skills through academic culture.

Findings

The results show that employee experience is the most importance significant performance indicator to enhance the performance of the engineering institute when academic culture is taken a mediator (Anderson et al., 1994; Owlia and Aspinwall, 1997; Pal Pandi et al., 2016). The direct effect of employee experience (Beta = 0.473) is less in comparison to the indirect effect (beta = 0.518). The student experience is also second important indicator that is very significant for the overall performance, and this level of signification is even more enhanced when academic culture acts as a mediator. On the other hand, employability of students (EM) (Ashok Pandit and Wallack, 2016) and branding (BR) play an important role to influence the overall performance of the HEIs. However, branding has least impact on the performance compared to the other indicators as it has lowest beta value (0.169). This reveals that engineering institutes need to emphasis on developing strategies to improve branding by participating in activities that enhance outreach and visibility of the institutes (Nandi and Chattopadhyay, 2011). The results of the study showed the academic culture acts as critical pathway to reach the performance peak.

Research limitations/implications

Competition is spreading in the higher education sector with widespread consequences, and in order to effectively respond to the pressures, universities have to be able to draw attention and retain their precious human capital. Developing linkages for faculty and student will generate mutually beneficial sustainable outcomes. Institutes preferably be multi-disciplinary or inter-disciplinary and have both teaching and research focus of an exceptionally high quality. Developing diverse programmes and activities targeting at developing quality of mind, ethical standard, social awareness and global perspectives, let the students shape their own experience and growth. Solid linkages with industry to impart a practical dimension to technical training is must, and an effective semester internship in industry is a testimony of project-led teaching. Research excellence and quality teaching are the basis of quality education. Engagement in external collaborations that extend and deepen institution impact through increasing international engagements. In future, empirical studies can also be conducted on the AQAR model by collecting data through questionnaires based on the perception of students, and it can be tested through hypotheses employing R software to determine the extent of implementation of AQAR in EEIs in India.

Practical implications

The results show that employee experience is the most important significant performance indicators to enhance the performance of the engineering institute when academic culture is taken a mediator (Anderson et al., 1994; Owlia and Aspinwall, 1997; Pal Pandi et al., 2016). The direct effect of employee experience (Beta = 0.473) is less in comparison to the indirect effect (beta = 0.518). The student experience is also second important indicator that is very significant for the overall performance, and this level of signification is even more enhanced when academic culture acts as a mediator. On the other hand, employability of students (EM) (Ashok Pandit and Wallack, 2016) and branding (BR) play an important role to influence the overall performance of the HEIs; however branding has least impact on the performance compared to the other indicators as it has lowest beta value (0.169). This reveals that engineering institutes need to emphasis on developing strategies to improve branding by participating in activities that enhance outreach and visibility of the institutes (Nandi and Chattopadhyay, 2011). The results of the study showed the academic culture acts as critical pathway to reach the performance peak.

Originality/value

The results show that student experience is the most importance significant performance indicators to enhance the performance of the engineering institute when academic culture is taken a mediator. The direct effect of student experience (Beta = 0.101) is less in comparison to the indirect effect (beta = 0.412). The employee experience is also second important indicator that is very significant for the overall performance, and this level of signification is even more enhanced when academic culture acts as a mediator. On the other hand, employability of students (EM) (Ashok Pandit and Wallack, 2016) and branding (BR) play an important role to influence the overall performance of the HEIs; however branding has least impact on the performance compared to the other indicators as it has lowest beta value (0.169). This reveals that engineering institutes need to emphasis on developing strategies to improve branding by participating in activities that enhance outreach and visibility of the institutes (Nandi and Chattopadhyay, 2011). The results of the study showed the academic culture acts as critical pathway to reach the performance peak.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 166000