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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Fatma Mete

To assess the creative role of sources of inspiration in visual clothing design. It aims to analyse simple, general accounts of observed design behaviour and early stages…

Abstract

Purpose

To assess the creative role of sources of inspiration in visual clothing design. It aims to analyse simple, general accounts of observed design behaviour and early stages of the clothing design process, what is the nature of design inspiration, how sources of inspiration are gathered and how they affect the creativity and originality in clothing design.

Design/methodology/approach

A progressive series of empirical studies looking at ready‐to‐wear clothing design has been undertaken; in situ observation, semi‐structured interviews and constrained and semi‐constrained design tasks. This empirical approach used ethnographic observational methods, which is effective in situations where conventional knowledge acquisition methods are insufficient, when broad understanding of an industry is needed, as in the fashion industry, not just a case study of a single individual or company.

Findings

Identifies the major types of idea sources in clothing design and provides information about each source. Recognises that these sources of inspiration help designers to create design elements and principles of individual designs. In order to foster originality, sources of inspiration play a powerful role throughout the creative stage of design process, and also in the early stages of fashion research and strategic collection planning.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the role of sources of inspiration and its effect in creativity and originality in the clothing design process. Offers practical help to clothing designers and design‐led clothing companies.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Ran Zhou, Kyriaki Kaplanidou, Dimitra Papadimitriou, Nicholas D. Theodorakis and Kostantinos Alexandris

The purpose of this paper is to explore the sources of inspiration for active participants in sport events, and the link between inspiration sources and event-related…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the sources of inspiration for active participants in sport events, and the link between inspiration sources and event-related outcomes (i.e. life satisfaction and behavioral intentions).

Design/methodology/approach

Research questions were examined using a Greek (n=264) and a US (n=103) sample of participants of two small-scale running events. Content analysis was used to identify and code the themes of inspiration, while a multivariate analyses of variance was performed to test the inspiration group differences on life satisfaction and behavioral intentions.

Findings

The qualitative findings revealed three categories of inspiration source identified in each sample. The quantitative results showed that the interaction between inspiration source and event type had an overall effect on participants’ life satisfaction and future participation intention. Specifically, findings highlighted the different roles of inspiration on influencing life satisfaction and participation intention of short-distance (i.e. 5 and 10k) event participants than those of long-distance (i.e. marathon) runners.

Research limitations/implications

This study identifies the sources of inspiration in small-scale sport events and provides preliminary empirical evidence where inspiration source and event type jointly influence participants’ life satisfaction and behavioral intentions.

Practical implications

Understanding the sources of inspiration provides event leveraging opportunities to inspire citizens to become more active in sports. Given that the sources of inspiration vary among different segments of event participants, event managers need to adopt differential communication and promotional activities geared to the needs of these targets.

Originality/value

The study provides the first empirical work exploring the sources of inspiration among active participants in small-scale sport events.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Alice Payne

The purpose of this paper is to identify both the inspiration sources used by fast fashion designers and ways the designers sort information from the sources during the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify both the inspiration sources used by fast fashion designers and ways the designers sort information from the sources during the product development process.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative study, drawing on semi-structured interviews conducted with the members of the in-house design teams of three Australian fast fashion companies.

Findings

Australian fast fashion designers rely on a combination of trend data, sales data, product analysis, and travel for design development ideas. The designers then use the consensus and embodiment methods to interpret and synthesise information from those inspiration sources.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical data used in the analysis were limited by interviewing fashion designers within only three Australian companies.

Originality/value

This research augments knowledge of fast fashion product development, in particular designers’ methods and approaches to product design within a volatile and competitive market.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Hong Sheng, Pianpian Yang and Yuanyue Feng

Social media has emerged as a new marketing channel and an important source for customer inspiration. Understanding the sources and consequences of customer inspiration

Abstract

Purpose

Social media has emerged as a new marketing channel and an important source for customer inspiration. Understanding the sources and consequences of customer inspiration via social media is important for both researchers and marketers. However, little has been done to empirically examine customer inspiration in the social media context. Specifically, the process through which customers become inspired and motivated by social media to purchase the advertised products remains elusive. Therefore, this study extends the conceptualisation of customer inspiration into the social media context, and explores the antecedents of customer inspiration from three perspectives: informational, social and personal. This study also examines the impact of customer inspiration on customers' behavioral intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey methodology was used and data from 679 respondents were collected in China. To examine the hypothesized relationships, partial least squares (PLS) was used to analyse the data and Smart PLS 3.0 was used for data analysis.

Findings

The study findings demonstrated that the vividness of ads, social influence and promotion focus had positive impacts on the “inspired-by state”, and subsequently the “inspired-to state”, which in turn positively influenced customers' purchasing intentions. However, media richness has a negative impact on the “inspired-by state”.

Originality/value

This study provides the first evidence of customer inspiration via social media and examines its antecedents and consequences. Practically, this study offers useful guidelines and suggestions for firms on how to inspire customers using social media.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 120 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

William Hemmig

Little is known about the information‐seeking behavior of practicing visual artists; what research exists has focused largely on art students, art faculty and librarians…

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about the information‐seeking behavior of practicing visual artists; what research exists has focused largely on art students, art faculty and librarians, although an untested model does emerge. The aim of this paper is to report the findings of an empirical study of a community of practicing visual artists, and to determine whether the model can be applied to such communities.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study was administered to a sample of a community of practicing visual artists in order to determine the community's use of various information sources in the service of creative and sales activities.

Findings

The paper finds that the model may be applied to practicing visual artists. It provides a portrait of the information behavior of a specific community of practice, and suggests how information use may differ, while following the model, among different demographic groups within the community.

Research limitations/implications

The research approach and findings do not conclusively define the uses that artists make of information. The sample size prohibits definitive analysis by demographic data. The quantitative approach facilitates effective identification of community behaviors, but qualitative research might enhance these findings by illuminating the information‐seeking and use processes of individuals.

Practical implications

Information providers will have a means of gathering and analyzing data about the information behaviors of specific communities of visual artists to be used in the creation of enhanced information environments.

Originality/value

The paper presents the first published research into the information behavior of a community of practicing visual artists without regard to alternative sources of income, academic affiliation, or library use. It presents a means of focusing on these unstudied and underserved communities.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 65 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Alex Avramenko

The purpose of this paper is to present results of an exploratory cross-cultural study aiming to examine the role and meaning of inspiration in organisational settings to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present results of an exploratory cross-cultural study aiming to examine the role and meaning of inspiration in organisational settings to advance the contemporary understanding of inspiration and its manifestations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilises Gadamerian philosophical hermeneutics to cultivate an understanding of the rationalisations of inspiration at work and to explore its conceptualisations to inform future research.

Findings

The findings strongly indicate that inspiration in its numerous manifestations is not confined to the domain of personal life and that it often occurs in organisational settings. There are no indications that inspiration is affected by the cultural belongingness of employees, rather it is found that attitudes towards inspiration differ among representatives of the different levels of the organisational hierarchy. A connection between motivation and inspiration is discussed and indication found that at the level of lay accounts the concepts are perceived to be both different and complementary.

Originality/value

The article presents a conceptualisation of inspiration in an organisational context to guide future research towards a more instrumental approach to recognising and utilising inspiration in contemporary management practice.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2020

Ernest Emeka Izogo and Mercy Mpinganjira

Although previous research emphasized the importance of inspiration in influencing consumer behavior, there is no categorical response to how social-media inspirational…

Abstract

Purpose

Although previous research emphasized the importance of inspiration in influencing consumer behavior, there is no categorical response to how social-media inspirational content inspires consumers across cultures. This paper aims to take on this agenda through a vignette experimental study.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper devised a vignette study involving subjects (n = 370) recruited from Nigeria and South Africa. The structural equation modeling procedure, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression analysis aided the examination of the scale psychometrics and hypotheses testing.

Findings

Among other findings, this study shows that: inspirational content (utilitarian vs hedonic) exerts a positive differential effect on customer inspiration (CI) such that the effect of hedonic content is more pronounced than utilitarian content; collectivistic consumers are inspired more than individualists; CI triggers customer engagement behaviors (CEBs) and purchase intention, and an inspired-to component of CI mediates the effect of inspired-by on CEBs and purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

While this study makes significant contributions to knowledge on CI, the focus on firm-generated content limits the scope of this study. Future research should examine the effect of consumer-generated content on CI. Additionally, the likely contextual influence of product type on CI and its triggers in the context of the foote, cone and belding grid creates the room to further interrogate the research model under conditions of high/low involvement products.

Originality/value

By showing how social-media inspirational content and cultural orientation separately influence and interact to influence CI which consequently triggers CEBs and purchase intention, the findings highlight the psychological mechanisms through which CEBs and purchase intention can be simultaneously triggered.

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Ann Medaille

The aim of this study is to explore the information needs and behaviors of practicing theatre artists. Psychological research into creativity provides a framework for…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to explore the information needs and behaviors of practicing theatre artists. Psychological research into creativity provides a framework for understanding both theatre artists' information‐seeking behavior and the role of information seeking and gathering in the creative process.

Design/methodology/approach

The exploratory study presents findings from an online questionnaire of 73 practicing theatre artists and qualitative data gathered from eight interviews with theatre professionals.

Findings

The study reveals that theatre artists seek information for six primary purposes: understanding a work's historical, cultural, and critical background; finding sources of inspiration; learning about contemporary or historical theatre productions, artists, and events; learning technical or process information; finding performance materials; and furthering career goals. Theatre artists view the information search process as being essential to their creative activities, and their first‐hand accounts of their artistic experiences illuminate the critical role that information seeking and gathering play in the creative process.

Research limitations/implications

Some theatre professions, such as lighting or sound design, were represented in the questionnaire but were not represented in the interviews.

Practical implications

The study has practical implications for the delivery of library and internet theatre art collections and information services.

Originality/value

Few studies have examined the information‐seeking behavior of practicing theatre artists. The paper demonstrates that studies of artists can be used to understand the role of information seeking and gathering in the creative processes of people working in various subject domains.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 66 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2011

Glenn D. Searle and Stephanie J. Hanrahan

The purpose of this paper was to examine inspiring others as a psychological construct in leadership contexts by investigating lived and personal experiences of inspiring leaders.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine inspiring others as a psychological construct in leadership contexts by investigating lived and personal experiences of inspiring leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenological design was used to investigate leaders' personal and lived experiences of leading to inspire others. In‐depth interviews were conducted with seven participants nominated by others as inspiring leaders based on the demonstration of five characteristics (vision, openness, transparency, passion, and being somewhat unconventional).

Findings

Participant responses coalesced into five key dimensions of leading to inspire others: connecting, leading, inspiree, action, and context; enabling a functional description of the phenomenon. Furthermore, results indicated that leaders could intentionally cultivate opportunities to inspire others through interaction and effort.

Research limitations/implications

Given that the paper investigates leaders' experiences of the phenomenon, further investigation into the relational and reciprocal aspects of inspiring others is required. Research has primarily focused on participants in the inspiring relationship independently of each other (i.e. either the inspiree or the leader).

Practical implications

Contrary to assertions in some transformational leadership studies that personal charisma is the primary component to inspiring others, these findings indicate that inspiring others requires an active process where leaders establish interpersonal connections and enable action.

Originality/value

Research on inspiration is at a formative stage. This paper represents an initial foray into the space where scholarly knowledge on leadership theory and inspiration intersect to provide greater insight into leading to inspire others.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2019

Su-Yen Chen, H.Y. Kuo and H.-Y. Chang

The purpose of this paper is to explore two types of Net-generation practitioners – writers and makers born in the 1980s – and how they describe their professions and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore two types of Net-generation practitioners – writers and makers born in the 1980s – and how they describe their professions and their information practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors distinguished the information practices of Net-generation writers and makers from those of their older counterparts and then examined the contextual factors associated with the shared meanings in each community of practice, by interviewing a total of 14 participants, 7 writers and 7 makers, and qualitatively analyzed the resulting data.

Findings

First, the professional boundaries perceived by Net-generation practitioners are more blurred than those of their older counterparts. Second, they rely on life experience, online platforms and print for their sources of information and inspiration. Third, Facebooking and the use of filter bubbles are among the most popular information practices. Fourth, diversity, uniqueness, multimodal, participatory and self-media are keywords in their content creation and information produced. Fifth, connectivity (connecting people and resources) and collective intelligence (emphasizing how expertise is collected and distributed) are key themes associated with these digital natives. Sixth, the authors also identified and compared differences between these two groups.

Research limitations/implications

The study limitations include the small sample size of each practitioner group and the fact that the methods are dependent on the participants’ abilities to describe their information practices.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to focus on the characteristics of digital natives and their information practices. It provides a tentative framework for further exploration and contributes to our initial understanding of this topic.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 75 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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