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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Rahul Khandelwal, Ashutosh Kolte, Prafulla Pawar and Elvira Martini

As skills need to be changed in a dynamic learning environment, employability depends not just on what people already know but on how well they learn, apply and adapt…

Abstract

Purpose

As skills need to be changed in a dynamic learning environment, employability depends not just on what people already know but on how well they learn, apply and adapt breaking out their comfort zone. This study explores how students from all backgrounds and teachers can engage with inclusive education without discrimination through pedagogy. The research provides a platform through implication for other international readers of developing countries to implement pedagogies of the Indian context.

Design/methodology/approach

This archival research focuses on the topical literature to scrutinize efficient ways to elevate the realization of all learners in inclusive settings. What inclusive pedagogy teaching approaches, focusing on the key competences and sustains learning which are effectual in elevating the academic success of all novices.

Findings

Educators need to develop their skills and competency by breaking their comfort zone, and individual recital of every faculty affiliate is a decisive feature in accomplishing quality for inclusive education. An education institution also needs to provide passable facilities to academicians and students in order to adapt and utilize technology efficiently without any discrimination. This is an important method of assisting educators to recognize and investigate using this epistemology in new innovative inclusive teaching pedagogy with technologies in industry 4.0.

Research limitations/implications

The study momentarily suggests an innovative pedagogy approach for stakeholders and users to be adapted in current digital arena.

Originality/value

Review of the concepts can provide valuable pointers for policy makers in other jurisdictions contemplating inclusive education. The issues that are dealt with relate to how all students with and without disability can be engaged in a classroom without discrimination, and development is incentivized using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in teaching pedagogy.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2020

Pavla Boulton

The purpose of this case study is to reflect on the blended pedagogies applied with a second year cohort of Early Years (EY) undergraduate students. It focusses on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to reflect on the blended pedagogies applied with a second year cohort of Early Years (EY) undergraduate students. It focusses on the experiences of both learner and educator as they explore the use of blending technology and outdoor learning to support a holistic curriculum in 21st century early years practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A reflective case study approach was applied to practice in situ as part of an outdoor learning project within a Level 5 module. One Higher Education (HE) tutor and 24 EY students participated in the study. Three research questions informed the reflective study: an exploration around the tensions of how digital technology might be blended with the more traditional, sensory and experiential pedagogies of outdoor learning, using an app. It considers the effects of this approach on student learning and what lessons can be learnt by the tutor in attempting to model these pedagogies.

Findings

This case study reveals the advantages and discomfort of role modelling a practice as HE tutor that has not been applied before in this context and as such is considered an innovative pedagogy (Koros-Mikis, 2009). EY students engaged in the blended provision, applying digital technology for educational purposes and this resulted in enhanced collaborative learning between students and tutor, affecting attendance and motivation to try new approaches in their practice. Reflecting on this practice has revealed that pedagogical thinking can be transformed when ideas are shared in a way that appears non-judgemental and new approaches can be applied where the right environment affords such opportunities.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations are around sample size, and a longer period of time for students to engage with a Personal Learning Environment (PLE), evidencing sustained engagement. The focus is one that is pertinent to the issues currently being considered as part of curriculum reform in Wales and as such may not hold the same weight in other parts of the world. As a case study, it is recognised that this is not generalizable and thus not easily replicable (Gilbert, 2008).

Practical implications

Issues around modelling pedagogies that depict 21st century learning are highlighted for “digital immigrant” HE teaching staff members. Understanding how to apply digital technology in a digital world within our own, often traditional practices, particularly in the field of early years outdoor learning needs further exploration in light of the new curriculum for Wales so that future practitioners are able to consider the holistic approach of blending pedagogies across areas of learning and not working in subject-specific silos.

Social implications

The implications of this case study raise questions around the appropriateness of training and development for “digital immigrant” staff members, understanding student digital competency, blending pedagogical approaches, as well as the debate around digital technologies being part of young children's learning within a reformed curriculum in Wales. These challenges present questions that require social consideration as well as arguments as to why they cannot be overlooked.

Originality/value

This case study identifies a need to explore the ways in which blended pedagogies are applied and modelled in HE practice and to observe how it influences students learning and beliefs in their own pedagogical practices. The curriculum reform in Wales suggests that teaching and learning will need to be far more holistic in nature and these two areas currently collide as pedagogies. Thus being able to demonstrate the value of them in synergy will be most helpful to practitioners who will need to make a paradigm shift in their approaches to embrace the new curriculum.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Enakshi Sengupta, Patrick Blessinger and Mandla S. Makhanya

With the turn of the century, the Earth's natural resources continue to be stretched as nonrenewable resources continue to dwindle and as the population continues to grow…

Abstract

With the turn of the century, the Earth's natural resources continue to be stretched as nonrenewable resources continue to dwindle and as the population continues to grow. Academia is no exception with human and teaching resources remaining a constraint for all universities including financial resources. Higher education (HE) leadership struggles to contain costs by reducing unnecessary expenditures while trying to ensure that quality remains a top priority. Innovative pedagogy is one way that institutions can help bridge both scarcity and quality and address the growing demand for quality education. New technologies, designing of new curriculum which is relevant and can address the realities of economic demands, have become a high priority in HE. Educators, policymakers and stakeholders have to embrace this transformational change for the progress of their institution. This book addresses such innovative changes that are being initiated by academics around the world. The focus of this book remains on innovative pedagogy, success stories of such interventions, impact on students while reinventing the learner-centered approach and its implication on the future. The authors of this book address the successes and the challenges they have faced.

Details

Humanizing Higher Education through Innovative Approaches for Teaching and Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-861-1

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Merja Mari-Anne Drake

The purpose of this paper is to test how to integrate innovation pedagogy into journalism and information and communication technology (ICT) teaching while creating a new…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test how to integrate innovation pedagogy into journalism and information and communication technology (ICT) teaching while creating a new product for a national media industry. The objectives of the study were to create a new joint course model in which students from different degree programmes would learn and create products and services together in three different stages: networked and collaborative learning, group-based learning and individual learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Innovation pedagogy is a practically oriented method and can be used for doing applied research. This new learning approach defines how knowledge is assimilated, produced and used while innovating. The research focus is on applied research, and one vital aim is to enhance students’ ability to participate in research and development activities with businesses and other organisations in society.

Findings

The learning outcomes based on learning at all stages, i.e. individual, group and networks, were successfully achieved, and a new course model was created. However, the model needs further development.

Originality/value

Innovation pedagogy is a new learning approach. Innovation has been a buzz word in education for at least for a decade – some universities have even embedded innovative thinking throughout their curricula, leading to a new learning approach called innovation pedagogy. Could innovation pedagogy help us to achieve better learning outcomes? Do journalists really need innovation competences? Could journalists and ICT students study together? To answer these questions, the authors began an experiment that uses innovation pedagogy.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2021

Eugene F. Asola and Samuel R. Hodge

In this chapter, we discuss health-related physical fitness and motor development assessments for students with physical disabilities or other health impairments in…

Abstract

In this chapter, we discuss health-related physical fitness and motor development assessments for students with physical disabilities or other health impairments in special education using traditional and innovative techniques. Traditional assessment techniques are those that are more standardized and formalized, while innovative assessment techniques refer to new variations or ways (alternative/authentic) to assess the abilities of students with physical disabilities and other health impairments. According to the United States Department of Education (2009), students with disabilities must be included in State and local assessments. Even though there has been significant growth in numbers, diversity and academic orientation of persons with physical disabilities, assessments practices have largely remained the same over the years. Adopting innovative pedagogies and emerging innovative assessment techniques may address some unmet needs of current students with disabilities faced with assessment biases.

Details

Traditional and Innovative Assessment Techniques for Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-890-1

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Karun Rawat, Frederic Bouchon and Vikneswaran Nair

This paper aims to explore innovative education approaches in a rural area of Thailand and the socioeconomic transformation fostered in that area through community-based…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore innovative education approaches in a rural area of Thailand and the socioeconomic transformation fostered in that area through community-based tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examined the elements in a case study that successfully linked “non-formal education” (NFE) channels to community development. More than half the population of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) still lives in rural areas, where poverty is widespread. Numerous programmes have been initiated to address the socioeconomic imbalances of the region, and tourism is now considered a driver for rural economic development. However, the development of human resources in rural areas remains low. Education is considered both an important tool for development and a channel for innovative practices to effect the socioeconomic transformation of rural areas. The data for this case study were sourced from secondary documents such as institutional communication, statistics, iconographic documents and websites. The data were analysed through content analysis and provided the basis for interpretation and conceptualisation of the innovative practices adopted by the school.

Findings

This study found that the efforts deployed in setting up a non-formal school in a marginalised rural area placed the community at the centre of the pedagogical approach. NFE, indeed, was found to have the ability to enhance the new concept of sustainability for socioeconomic transformation. It helped to leverage the knowledge gained at school onto other skills such as communication and business and built entrepreneurs with the skills and knowledge of newer technology required to develop the tourism industry.

Research limitations/implications

This study is expected to delineate the basis of a framework for innovation in rural education. This framework should be relevant to researchers and practitioners, and could guide local communities in Thailand and other areas of ASEAN.

Originality/value

This is the first study of its kind to examine innovative practices initiated by a specific community school that enhanced tourism and built entrepreneurs. This model can be replicated in other field studies.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Case study
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Mihir Ajgaonkar and Keith D’Souza

The subject areas are organizational management, organizational behaviour and human resource management.

Abstract

Subject area

The subject areas are organizational management, organizational behaviour and human resource management.

Study level/applicability

The study is applicable for courses in human resource management and organizational behaviour as part of masters-level programmes in business administration and management, executive development programmes on organization design and development for middle/senior management.

Case overview

In 2003, Elizabeth and Sunil Mehta had founded a voluntary organization, “Muktangan”, focussed on child-centric education through innovative pedagogy for the community of the urban poor. Elizabeth, an educationist, and Sunil, a highly successful business person, joined hands to contribute to the well-being of urban poor to make a difference to their lives. Elizabeth and Sunil presented a proposal to impart education for “the children of the community, by the teachers drawn from the community” to the residents of the slums in central Mumbai. With a humble beginning of running a small pre-school, Muktangan now manages seven schools with 3,400 children and 500 teachers, and a teachers’ training centre with a capacity to train 100 teachers a year. Muktangan won acclaim for its unique pedagogy and a very effective child-to-teacher ratio. Over the years, Elizabeth and Sunil led Muktangan with a strong passion and a “hands-on” approach. Of late, Elizabeth and Sunil faced questions from their donors about the sustainability of Muktangan with respect to leadership and management succession. Elizabeth and Sunil had a vision for Muktangan for self-directed growth with an empowered team. Muktangan embarked on the journey to create a leadership for self-directed growth. Sunil, Elizabeth and team Muktangan conceptualized and implemented a change management intervention with help from an external consultant to build the desired organization.

Expected learning outcomes

Outcomes are understanding issues involved in the leadership, organization design and management of change, particularly of those organizations engaged in social change and development in developing societies.

Supplementary materials

The Muktangan Story: Part A – An Organizational Study; The Muktangan Story Part B – Winds of Change; Teaching Note; References: Bradach J. (1996), Organizational Alignment: The 7-S Model, Harvard Business School Publishing, Boston, MA 02,163. Cooperrider D. and Whitney D. (2005), “A Positive Revolution in Change: Appreciative Inquiry”, In The Change Handbook. The Definitive Resource on Today’s Best Methods for Engaging.Whole Systems, by Peggy Holman, Tom Devane, and Steven Cady. Berrett-Koehler Publishers. Cooperrider D., Whitney D., and Stavros J.M. (2008), Appreciative Inquiry Handbook for Leaders of Change (Second Edition), Berrett-Koehler Publishers. Greiner, L.E. (1998), “Evolution and Revolution as Organizations Grow”, Harvard Business Review, May-June, 3-11. www.muktanganedu.org/ accessed 12 April, 2018. Kessler, E. H., (2013) (ed.), Encyclopaedia of Management Theory, Sage Publications Kotter, J. P. (1996), Leading Change, Harvard Business School Press, Boston. Lewin K. (1951), Field Theory in social science, Harper & Row, New York. Waterman, R. H., Peters, T. J., and Phillips, J. R. (1980), Structure is not organization. Business Horizons, 23(3), 14-26.

Subject code:

CSS 6: Human Resource Management.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Jessica Lichy, Tatiana Khvatova and Kevin Pon

The purpose of this paper is to provide an insight into the extent to which faculty have adopted technology-enhanced learning in the delivery of undergraduate programmes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an insight into the extent to which faculty have adopted technology-enhanced learning in the delivery of undergraduate programmes to a largely international cohort, and indirectly the barriers that may be preventing a more widespread use of technology.

Design/methodology/approach

The enquiry takes a cross-disciplinary approach to explore how technology is used in the delivery of international programmes in France and Russia; the focus lies at the intersection of technology-led learning and managing cultural diversity. A face-to-face survey is used to gather the more specific information about teaching practices at each institution.

Findings

The findings of the survey strongly suggest that technology acceptance and technology awareness are influenced by a number of complex factors in this particular cultural context. The study concludes by discussing various recommendations for integrating technology into courses delivered across the partner institutions.

Research limitations/implications

The two institutions are based in “second cities” but they do not reflect a nation-wide attitude to using technology for teaching purposes. The findings cannot be extrapolated beyond this relatively restricted geographic sample.

Originality/value

Existing studies often discuss and compare student reactions to technology-enhanced learning but there is a gap in the understanding of the broader factors that can influence the delivery of course materials using technology. The perception and usage of internet technology can vary considerably across different cultures and linguistic communities, and this factor can have an impact on the way a course is delivered.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Scott A. Johnson and Jing Luo

Engaging students in an active, self-directed approach to learning about leadership is best accomplished through personalized self-awareness, reflection, and connection to…

Abstract

Engaging students in an active, self-directed approach to learning about leadership is best accomplished through personalized self-awareness, reflection, and connection to real-time, practical applications/examples through experiential learning. This is especially challenging for students whose cultural backgrounds, language, and/or educational preparation/training predispose them to more passively “receive knowledge” in an unquestioning, unexamined manner, without critical thinking. At the University of Greenwich Business School, a final year course has been re-imagined as personalized leadership development integrated with learning technology. Our teaching team is taking advantage of an interactive virtual simulation (vLeader) to engage Chinese students who otherwise might not participate fully in the expected manner of a Westernized learning environment. This chapter outlines our integrated approach to support and engage these students in learning outcomes for continuing success in their lives, careers, and leadership opportunities.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Immersive Interfaces: Virtual Worlds, Gaming, and Simulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-241-7

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Rosa Maria Banda, Alonzo M. Flowers and Petra Robinson

Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs), like other universities, are faced with challenges related to faculty diversity. The literature related to faculty at HSIs is scant…

Abstract

Purpose

Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs), like other universities, are faced with challenges related to faculty diversity. The literature related to faculty at HSIs is scant and so this paper aims to address this gap by problematizing faculty diversity at these institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

By means of a document analysis, the authors have scoured the data on faculty demographics at these institutions and the findings of the study are threefold.

Findings

First, a lack of accessible and transparent data exists. Second, there is a lack of available demographic information and third, this creates a dismal narrative regarding faculty diversity at HSIs.

Research limitations/implications

Further critical research is warranted as a means to uncover data on faculty diversity at HSIs.

Originality/value

This study supports the need for a critical consciousness lens to problematize faculty diversity at HSIs.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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