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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

Laurie Bonney, Rob Clark, Ray Collins and Andrew Fearne

The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the importance of a strategic approach to collaborative innovation and the use of a value chain research methodology for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the importance of a strategic approach to collaborative innovation and the use of a value chain research methodology for identifying opportunities for co‐innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Value chain analysis is used to map three flows in the Houston Farms value chain; material flow, information flow and relationships. Having diagnosed the current level of co‐innovation we then identify improvement projects and opportunities for co‐innovation to reduce cost and add value, for the benefit of the value chain as a whole.

Findings

The application of the value chain analysis methodology to the Houston Farms value chain revealed the importance of strategy and robust processes in key areas for co‐innovation – R&D and new product development. It also revealed that small businesses can enjoy a degree of success as a result of comparative advantage in certain areas but that sustainable competitive advantage cannot occur by chance – identifying the potential for co‐innovation is an important first step in the right direction.

Research limitations/implications

The value chain innovation roadmap represents a useful framework for exploring the current state and future capability for co‐innovation in a value chain. The value chain analysis methodology is an effective diagnostic tool as it focuses on what happens at the interface between stakeholders and how this relates to what final consumers regard as value adding, rather than traditional financial and functional KPIs which make it difficult to explore the competitiveness of the value chain as a whole.

Originality/value

The explicit and objective measurement of what consumers value is an important addition to the value chain analysis methodology and the co‐innovation roadmap is an original attempt to illustrate the core drivers and capabilities for achieving co‐innovation in a value chain. The insights from the case demonstrate the value of this approach to companies who are open to innovation and recognise the need to focus the use of scarce value‐adding resources on specific value chains and the needs and wants of final consumers therein.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2014

Paul C. van Fenema, Bianca Keers and Henk Zijm

Sharing services increasingly extends beyond intraorganizational concentration of service delivery. Organizations have started to promote cooperation across their…

Abstract

Purpose

Sharing services increasingly extends beyond intraorganizational concentration of service delivery. Organizations have started to promote cooperation across their boundaries to deal with strategic tensions in their value ecosystem, moving beyond traditional outsourcing. This chapter addresses two research questions geared to the challenge of interorganizational shared services (ISS): why would organizations want to get and remain involved in ISS? And: what are the implications of ISS for (inter)organizational value creation?

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual chapter reviews literature pertaining to ISS from public, commercial, and nongovernmental sectors. ISS is understood as a multistakeholder organizational innovation. In order to analyze ISS and conduct empirical research, we developed a taxonomy and research framework.

Findings

The chapter shows how ISS can be positioned in value chains, distinguishing vertical, horizontal, and hybrid ISS. It outlines ISS implications for developing business models, structures, and relationships. Success factors and barriers are presented that epitomize the dynamic interplay of organizational autonomy and interorganizational dependence.

Research limitations/implications

The research framework offers conceptual ideas for theoretical and empirical work. Researchers involved in ISS studies may adopt strategic, strategic innovation, and organizational innovation perspectives.

Practical implications

ISS phases are distinguished to focus innovation management — initiation, enactment, and evaluation. Furthermore, insights are provided into processes and interventions aimed at making ISS a success for participating organizations.

Originality/value

Cross-sectoral perspective on ISS; taxonomy of ISS; research framework built on organization and strategic management literature.

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2008

Daniel I. Prajogo, Peggy McDermott and Mark Goh

This paper aims to explore the extent to which four elements of the value chain – marketing, research and development, procurement, and operations – are associated with…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the extent to which four elements of the value chain – marketing, research and development, procurement, and operations – are associated with product quality and product innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 194 managers of Australian firms, and multivariate analysis using structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The elements of the value chain differ in their association with product outcomes. Marketing and production are related to product quality, but surprisingly while research and development is related to product innovation, marketing is not. Procurement is related to both product quality and product innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows that individual elements of the value chain are related to specific competitive strategies and how these elements are related to each other, suggesting the need to direct effort within the firm for better, targeted performance. The results are limited by the sample size and geography of the survey.

Practical implications

Specific value chain functions tend to be associated with specific performance outcomes. This suggests that managers might gain by targeting specific elements of the value chain as their organizations strive for specific competitive goals.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to help managers and decision makers to assess the relationship between the different attributes of the value chain and product quality and innovation. It is often not feasible for managers to emphasize all the elements of the value chain simultaneously, and this paper provides an important step in looking at these individual linkages.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Jesper Kronborg Jensen, Kristin Balslev Munksgaard and Jan Stentoft Arlbjørn

The need for innovations to achieve economically viable and green supply chains has been illuminated in recent literature. Closed‐loop supply chains are part of green…

Abstract

Purpose

The need for innovations to achieve economically viable and green supply chains has been illuminated in recent literature. Closed‐loop supply chains are part of green supply chain management and include traditional forward supply‐chain activities as well as additional activities of the reverse supply chain. Extant supply chain literature calls for a chain perspective in order to avoid sub‐optimization in the chain since changes at one stage can affect the performance at other stages. The purpose of the paper is to analyze how implementation of green supply chain innovations can enhance value offerings along the supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on an explorative, single‐embedded case study of a food supply chain. The case is concerned with implementation of green supply chain innovation in terms of biogas technology. The single case comprises four actors in the food supply chain: a retailer, an industrial bakery, a mill, and a farmer. Data collection is based on semi‐structured interviews with persons responsible for sustainability in the respective companies.

Findings

The case demonstrates that in order to reach the full potential of a green supply chain innovation, the different supply chain actors must be included. What in isolation of one company's perspective is perceived as a waste can be transformed to a value when the problem area is analysed from a chain perspective.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on a single case study that does not provide static generalizations, and it represents the first step on a road to building new theory about green supply chain innovations. Future research can expand the findings by elaborating upon cases of other types of supply chains and supply chain innovations.

Practical implications

The perception of waste in a supply chain can be changed through green supply chain innovations. This case illustrates how obsolete food products at the retail level, which traditionally have been perceived as a waste product with related discarding costs, can be regarded as a valued input by implementation of biogas technology at the industrial bakery company. As a result, other food supply chains can investigate similar solutions.

Originality/value

The paper provides a case that visualizes how value offerings along a food supply chain can be chased through green supply chain innovations. Furthermore, the paper applies a supply chain perspective not only conceptually but also empirically. By focusing on the interfaces between each main actor in the supply chain, this paper contributes to existing research with valuable knowledge of inter‐organizational issues related to challenges of supply chain innovation.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Andre Devaux, Maximo Torero, Jason Donovan and Douglas Horton

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to take stock of the current state of knowledge about inclusive value-chain development (VCD) in the context of international…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to take stock of the current state of knowledge about inclusive value-chain development (VCD) in the context of international agricultural research; and second, to draw out the implications for future research and action.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a review of recent research papers authored by professionals affiliated with international agricultural research centers and their partners in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

Findings

The studies reviewed in the paper identify the opportunities emerging from new and expanding markets for agricultural products and challenges to smallholder participation in these markets. It identifies key attributes of successful value-chain interventions, emphasizing the importance of combining value-chain approaches with other approaches, including those emerging from innovation systems and rural livelihoods frameworks. Methods are offered for evaluating complex value-chain interventions.

Research limitations/implications

The paper summarizes the state of knowledge as of early 2016 in a dynamic field. Important contributions to knowledge may have been made since then.

Originality/value

The paper summarizes the state of knowledge in the field, and identifies emerging issues and policy implications, knowledge gaps, and priorities for future applied research.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Ebrahim Rasti Borazjani Faghat, Naser Khani and Akbar Alemtabriz

The purpose of this paper is to propose a paradigmatic model for shared value innovation management in the supply chain. This research seeks to identify the causal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a paradigmatic model for shared value innovation management in the supply chain. This research seeks to identify the causal conditions, strategies, contextual factors, intervening factors and the consequences of shared value innovation in the supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach of this research is qualitative and has been carried out in the framework of the grounded theory. Required data for the research was collected through semi-structured interviews. Coding was done in two steps and the reliability of the results of the research was confirmed by calculating the similarity index of codes by two methods.

Findings

The proposed framework is presented in the form of a paradigmatic model and demonstrates how to achieve shared value innovation through increasing adoption with customer considerations, improving communication between supply chain members, improving collaboration among supply chain members, enhancing trust among supply chain members, enhancing the commitment of the supply chain members, enhancing supply chain members’ interdependence while maintaining their independence and simultaneously reducing costs. The results of the analysis showed that the shared value innovation leads to positive consequences such as increasing competitive abilities, human development, synergy, inclusive growth and development and also the sustainability of the business situation.

Originality/value

Although some studies have shown the importance of value innovation in different parts of the organization and to some extent the introduction of shared value innovation, no research has been done to provide a framework or model for managing shared value innovation.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Verena Bitzer and Jos Bijman

Building on recent advances in innovation research on developing country agriculture, this paper explores the concept of co-innovation, i.e. innovations that combine…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on recent advances in innovation research on developing country agriculture, this paper explores the concept of co-innovation, i.e. innovations that combine technological, organisational and institutional changes and that encompass different actors in and around the value chain. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a further conceptualisation of co-innovation and show its usefulness for analysing innovation initiatives in agrifood chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper combines two streams of literature (innovation systems and value chains) and is based on a review of the experiences with innovation in three different value chains in three African countries: potato in Ethiopia, pineapple in Benin and citrus in South Africa.

Findings

Co-innovation is the combination of collaborative, complementary and coordinated innovation. “Collaborative” refers to the multi-actor character of the innovation process, where each actor brings in specific knowledge and resources. “Complementary” indicates the smart combination of technological, organisational and institutional innovation. “Coordinated” draws attention to the importance of chain-wide adjustments and changes to make innovation in one stage of the chain a success.

Practical implications

The identified dimensions of co-innovation (the triple “co-”) provide a practical guide for the design of effective interventions aimed at promoting innovation in African agrifood chains.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to provide a comprehensive conceptualisation of co-innovation. On the basis of both theoretical arguments and evidence from three illustrative case studies it is argued that successful innovation in agrifood chains requires the innovation process to be collaborative, coordinated and complementary.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Raffaele Dicecca, Stefano Pascucci and Francesco Contò

Smallholder farmers often deal with lack of information and knowledge, weak financial capacity and limited collaboration and network orientation. This is hampering their…

Abstract

Purpose

Smallholder farmers often deal with lack of information and knowledge, weak financial capacity and limited collaboration and network orientation. This is hampering their ability to adopt or co-develop innovation, and to participate in value chain exchanges. This calls for using intermediary organizations. The purpose of this paper is to understand how innovation intermediaries engage with smallholder farmers and provoke value chain reconfigurations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors systematically review literature to draw cases on intermediaries operating in the agri-food sector in several geographical and socio-economic contexts. The authors then adopt a theory building from cases approach to identify relationships between smallholder farmers and innovation intermediaries, and their effects in the reconfiguration of value chains.

Findings

Consultants, knowledge transfer organizations (KTOs) and broker organizations (BOs) are the three typologies of intermediaries identified. While consultants facilitate change by modifying the way smallholders engage in transactions with their buyers and input providers, KTOs focus on farmers engagement in the value chain by stimulating the formation of knowledge platform or partnership. BOs operate in a similar way as compared to KTOs but mainly by forming and facilitating access to informal networks.

Practical implications

The authors build a framework in which relationships between typologies of intermediary organizations and types of innovation processes are connected with changes at value chain level.

Originality/value

The authors highlight how diverse forms of intermediations may stimulate not only smallholder farmers’ participation in innovation networks but also value chain reconfigurations.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

David Walters and Mark Rainbird

The purpose of this paper is to briefly review earlier contributions to partner/cooperative innovation with the aim of evaluating the application of the concept to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to briefly review earlier contributions to partner/cooperative innovation with the aim of evaluating the application of the concept to the increasingly popular virtual/value chain business model.

Design/methodology/approach

A number of example cases of partner/cooperative innovation are examined and, although these are limited in number, it would appear that a classification of types of partner/cooperative innovation is possible.

Findings

Partner/cooperative innovation combines elements of process and product innovation management within a “network structure” to create a product‐service response that neither partner could create using its own resources. They extend in both directions of the supply chain (upstream and down stream) and include supplier relationship management such as that demonstrated between Dell and its myriad of suppliers, and examples of customer relationship management such as the relationship that Caterpillar has built with its distributor/service network.

Research limitations/implications

The findings need further validation through empirical data analysis in appropriate industrial settings.

Practical implications

The paper includes a model that facilitates the evaluation of the “total efficacy” of partner/cooperative innovation alternatives. As such, the paper offers a viewpoint to be considered by management.

Originality/value

The paper describes partnership/cooperative innovation that combines elements of process innovation management and product innovation management within a network structure. Neither partner can independently create this network using its own resources to meet customer/market determined expectations for product and/or service performance at an economic (viable) cost. Third party involvement is typical.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Rania A.M. Shamah

This research aims to provide guidance for management of green service supply chains to improve the likelihood and extent of innovation and joint productivity performance…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to provide guidance for management of green service supply chains to improve the likelihood and extent of innovation and joint productivity performance for value creation, with regard to coupling the potential role of the customer to increase supply chains performance. It is the purpose of this study to address the impact of green innovation privileged on service supply chains, then to address the prerequisite factors for enhancing the entire chain value creation.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of extant research was undertaken for Egyptian hotels. It involved one type of questionnaire, provided across all managerial levels: top, senior, and executive managers. This questionnaire is divided into four main sections: the first section considers value creation, since the second section is related to trust; the third section is related to sharing knowledge; and the latest section is related to joint productivity.

Findings

The paper finds that it is possible to assist managers in thinking about adding value for supply chains.

Research limitations/implications

The study period interval in data collection may have influenced the variance in responses and therefore should be considered a limitation.

Practical implications

The ability to customize the simulator's parameters to represent value creation makes it a powerful tool for managers when deciding to rely on service supply chain.

Originality/value

This paper presents main elements required for enhancing value creation for all supply chain parties.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

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