Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
Article
Publication date: 24 February 2022

Abel Dula Wedajo, Mesfin Welderufael Berhe and Huilin Xiao

The purpose of this study is to see how the economy-wide spillover effect affects company process innovation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to see how the economy-wide spillover effect affects company process innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

To account for national differences, the current study used a hierarchical model.

Findings

The findings of this study show that knowledge spillover is related to and influences the innovation process of businesses. Only a level two study that takes into account country-specific differences may reveal this. The current work uses a hierarchical model to try to capture knowledge spillover. Furthermore, the findings suggest that medium and large businesses, as well as businesses conducting research and development (R&D), are more inventive than small businesses and firms not conducting R&D. Furthermore, female-owned businesses are more likely than their male counterparts to innovate their processes.

Originality/value

This study is unique in that it makes predictions about how businesses innovate (behave) based on firm-level characteristics, or macroeconomic structure, without sacrificing information and variance. Furthermore, this study attempts to solve the difficulty of prior empirical research’s single-level analysis and cross-level inference. The research is based on data from the 2019 World Bank regular Enterprise Survey, which includes 18,148 businesses from 38 countries.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Angeles Montoro‐Sánchez, Marta Ortiz‐de‐Urbina‐Criado and Eva M. Mora‐Valentín

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effects of knowledge spillovers on innovation and collaboration among firms located in science and technology parks (STPs)

3510

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effects of knowledge spillovers on innovation and collaboration among firms located in science and technology parks (STPs). To do so, whether knowledge spillovers imply a greater degree of innovation in its various forms – product, process, organisational and commercial – and greater inter‐organisational collaboration on research and development (R&D) is analysed. Explicitly, this article examines these effects by identifying and distinguishing between firms located on and off STPs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a quantitative approach. After reviewing the literature, the study tests the hypotheses empirically using a sample of 784 firms, and performing several logistic binomial regressions to analyse the impact of each type of knowledge spillover on each type of innovation and on the likelihood of firms establishing inter‐organisational collaborative R&D agreements.

Findings

The results show that knowledge spillovers have a positive impact on firm propensity to innovate and on the probability of firms engaging in inter‐organisational R&D collaboration. Furthermore, firm location within an STP is found to influence the intensity of the effect of spillovers on innovation and on R&D cooperation. Thus, the magnitude of the effects of spillovers differs according to the type of the spillover.

Originality/value

Given the special features of spillovers and the scarce evidence available analysing the relationship between spillovers, innovation and cooperation and the location on STPs, this work contributes significant empirical evidence to the existing literature.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2022

Pedro Mota Veiga, Cristina Fernandes and Filipe Ambrósio

The aim of the study is to analyze how knowledge spillovers and knowledge management capabilities affect the innovation capabilities of hospitality sector companies in…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to analyze how knowledge spillovers and knowledge management capabilities affect the innovation capabilities of hospitality sector companies in crisis environments.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was completed by 63 hotel directors based in Portugal, gathering data on knowledge spillover, knowledge management capabilities and innovation capabilities. Two multiple linear regression models were used to estimate the impact of knowledge spillovers and knowledge management capabilities on innovative capability.

Findings

It has been concluded that knowledge spillovers work as external benefits of knowledge creation, increasing the innovation activities of companies in the hospitality sector, which reinforces that knowledge spillovers help to enhance innovation capabilities. The study's results show that it is essential for companies to manage knowledge. It also concludes that effective knowledge management facilitates the exchange of knowledge required in the innovation process. Knowledge spillovers improve the performance of innovation in companies through the development of new insights and innovation capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

This research was carried out in a period of crisis. As expected in a troubled period, the results are extremely volatile. This study's sample is composed of Portuguese hospitality companies.

Originality/value

This research provides valuable insights into the overflow of explicit and tacit knowledge in the hotel industry. Moreover, this study offers new insights into the mediating role of knowledge management capability in the relationship between a hotel's knowledge overflow and its innovation performance.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2018

Luigi Aldieri, Maxim Kotsemir and Concetto Paolo Vinci

The purpose of this paper is to look at the factors driving labour creation in Russia, while paying attention to the role of innovation policy. The study considers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at the factors driving labour creation in Russia, while paying attention to the role of innovation policy. The study considers innovation variables with indicators linked to social conditions (social filter component) and geographical spillovers for 85 regions during the period 2010-2016.

Design/methodology/approach

In particular, the study uses latitude and longitude coordinates to compute the distance between Russian regions according to the Haversine formula. In this manner, it measures the spillovers as the weighted sum of R&D capital stock on the basis of computed distance, according to the accessibility index procedure.

Findings

The finding is very important in terms of policy implications for supporting employment. As the results stress that own innovation produces labour creation effects, while knowledge spillovers are labour-saving, the study could conclude that regional innovation policy may have undetermined the objective of an efficient level of absorptive capacity able to benefit positively from external innovation.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the literature by exploring whether geographical spillovers are labour-friendly or labour-saving in Russia.

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2022

Yan Liu and Heng Xu

This paper aims to investigate the motivation for firms to innovate their products to be socially responsible in the presence of the spillover effect. The follower of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the motivation for firms to innovate their products to be socially responsible in the presence of the spillover effect. The follower of the innovation in corporate social responsibility (CSR) can benefit from the leader’s innovation by technological spillover. For instance, evidence can be found in the cosmetics industry (e.g. Lush Retail Ltd. and The Body Shop) and the market of hybrid electric vehicles (e.g. Toyota and Honda). Moreover, consumers may have different perceptions on the sequence of CSR innovation by firms, they may prefer more on the CSR product launched by the leader because they usually relate the desired stage to their interests when making a purchase decision. Therefore, the firms’ decision to be a leader of the CSR innovation depends on the trade-off between the loss in the spillover effect and the benefit of the first-mover advantage, which has not been considered by the existing literature. This paper explains the firms’ motivation on CSR innovation in a realistic situation where competing firms’ CSR programs are launched sequentially and sheds light on the private sector’s decision on strategy from the perspective on the social contribution, and provides some managerial implications about the competing firms’ strategies of launching the CSR innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors construct a two-period Hotelling model in which consumers are divided into two groups: the altruistic and normal consumers. The altruistic consumers have more willingness to pay for the CSR product while the normal consumers only care about the product performance improved by the firms’ CSR activities. Firms have the option to innovate their basic products to be socially responsible and make their decision on such CSR innovation sequentially. Moreover, the follower of the innovation can receive a spillover effect from the leader, meaning that there may exist a second-mover advantage in terms of innovation (the authors define this as a spillover effect), but in the meanwhile, the altruistic consumers value more on the CSR product sold by the leader than that by the follower (the authors define this as a preference-reduction effect). This implies that the firm can benefit in the production process from being a second-mover of the CSR innovation but may lose its first-mover advantage in terms of the preference-reduction effect. By finding and analyzing the sub-game perfect Nash equilibrium, the authors try to figure out the firms’ decisions on CSR innovation in various situations.

Findings

The authors find that the firms’ motivation of CSR innovation crucially depends on the fraction of the altruistic consumers, as well as the spillover effect and the preference-reduction effect. A large (small) fraction of the altruistic consumers attracts (restricts) both the leader and the follower to engage in CSR innovation. More importantly, when such fraction is not too large but stays at a relatively high level, a potential leader of the CSR innovation may not wish to innovate. Hence, the potential follower may be the monopolist in the market of the socially responsible product. In addition, the authors reexamine this result in a variation model where a leader can make its decision on the CSR innovation to be more flexible by allowing it can innovate in either periods 1 or 2. The authors demonstrate that when the fraction of the altruistic consumers falls in an intermediate range, the leader may wish to delay the CSR innovation to period 2. In such a case, the leader of the CSR innovation may tend to trade its first-mover advantage for head-to-head competition with the follower and prevents the follower from benefiting from the spillover effect. Moreover, a flexible choice on the CSR innovation brings greater initiative to a firm to be the leader of the innovation.

Originality/value

Nearly all the studies about firms’ decisions on CSR innovation are conducted in an environment of simultaneous move, which is not appropriate to describe the real business world; many pieces of evidence show that many CSR programs are launched sequentially rather than simultaneously. The theory identifies a couple of important factors of the CSR innovation in a more realistic situation, i.e. sequential more on CSR innovation. Both spillover effect and preference-reduction effect crucially affect the firms’ decision on innovating their products to be socially responsible, which contributes to the existing literature in CSR and strategic decision. This paper also sheds some light on managerial implications with CSR innovation under various situations of competition.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Chun‐Yao Tseng, Da Chang Pai and Chi‐Hsia Hung

The purpose of this paper is to discuss whether the three knowledge sources, knowledge input, knowledge spillover and knowledge absorptive capacity, really increase the

4185

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss whether the three knowledge sources, knowledge input, knowledge spillover and knowledge absorptive capacity, really increase the innovation performance of firms in the Taiwan IC design industry, one of the most important knowledge‐intensive business services (KIBS) industries in Taiwan.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the knowledge‐based theory, this study uses pooled regression analysis and tests with fixed effect model to analyze the influence of three knowledge sources on innovation performance in the KIBS sector.

Findings

The results demonstrate that: knowledge input is positively related to innovation performance; knowledge spillover effect is partial positively to innovation performance; and knowledge absorptive capacity is positively related to innovation performance.

Originality/value

The paper advances the concept of absorptive capacity by defining it as the interactions between knowledge input and knowledge spillover and refines the measurement of absorptive capacity as the multiplication of knowledge input and knowledge spillover effects. Moreover, knowledge spillover effects and knowledge absorptive capacity are both divided into four kinds which help us distinguish clearly different sources of knowledge spillover and absorptive capacity. In addition to that, this study also contributes to the empirical evidence to innovation activities by using firm‐level micro data.

Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Luiz Fernando de Paris Caldas, Fabio de Oliveira Paula and T. Diana L. van Aduard de Macedo-Soares

The purpose of this paper is to analyze to what extent spending on innovation activities and collaboration at the industry level affects the relationship between firm…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze to what extent spending on innovation activities and collaboration at the industry level affects the relationship between firm innovation and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model was proposed and empirically tested using multiple linear regression. The data were obtained from the Community Innovation Survey 2012, composing a sample of 890 Italian manufacturing firms.

Findings

The results provided full support for the positive moderating effect of intra-industry innovation spending and partial support for the positive moderating effect of intra-industry collaboration, both regarding the relationship between firm innovation spending and performance. Knowledge spillovers derived from intra-industry innovation spending and intra-industry collaboration affect firm performance. While this finding corroborates other studies that have found that the intra-industry R&D spending influences firms’ innovation and performance, it also contributes to improve the understanding about the complementarity of internal innovation activities and knowledge spillovers.

Originality/value

This study contributes to theory by filling a gap concerning the complementarity of internal innovation activities and the effect of knowledge spillovers to improve firm performance. Our findings suggested that intra-industry openness to collaboration and innovation spending, as proxies of knowledge spillovers, plays an important role in complementing firm level innovative efforts, even in the case of firms that spend less on innovation and have a lower degree of collaboration. This is especially relevant for small and medium enterprises, which can take advantage of access to the necessary information to overcome their internal resource constraints for R&D and innovation. The originality of these findings adds value in terms of furthering the understanding of this phenomenon.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2016

Yuxue Sheng and James P. LeSage

We are interested in modeling the impact of spatial and interindustry dependence on firm-level innovation of Chinese firms The existence of network ties between cities…

Abstract

We are interested in modeling the impact of spatial and interindustry dependence on firm-level innovation of Chinese firms The existence of network ties between cities imply that changes taking place in one city could influence innovation by firms in nearby cities (local spatial spillovers), or set in motion a series of spatial diffusion and feedback impacts across multiple cities (global spatial spillovers). We use the term local spatial spillovers to reflect a scenario where only immediately neighboring cities are impacted, whereas the term global spatial spillovers represent a situation where impacts fall on neighboring cities, as well as higher order neighbors (neighbors to the neighboring cities, neighbors to the neighbors of the neighbors, and so on). Global spatial spillovers also involve feedback impacts from neighboring cities, and imply the existence of a wider diffusion of impacts over space (higher order neighbors).

Similarly, the existence of national interindustry input-output ties implies that changes occurring in one industry could influence innovation by firms operating in directly related industries (local interindustry spillovers), or set in motion a series of in interindustry diffusion and feedback impacts across multiple industries (global interindustry spillovers).

Typical linear models of firm-level innovation based on knowledge production functions would rely on city- and industry-specific fixed effects to allow for differences in the level of innovation by firms located in different cities and operating in different industries. This approach however ignores the fact that, spatial dependence between cities and interindustry dependence arising from input-output relationships, may imply interaction, not simply heterogeneity across cities and industries.

We construct a Bayesian hierarchical model that allows for both city- and industry-level interaction (global spillovers) and subsumes other innovation scenarios such as: (1) heterogeneity that implies level differences (fixed effects) and (2) contextual effects that imply local spillovers as special cases.

Details

Spatial Econometrics: Qualitative and Limited Dependent Variables
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-986-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2011

Paola Garrone, Lucia Piscitello and Yan Wang

Purpose – This chapter aims at investigating the impact of cross-border knowledge spillovers on technological innovation in the renewable energy sector.…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter aims at investigating the impact of cross-border knowledge spillovers on technological innovation in the renewable energy sector.

Methodology/approach – The analysis presented in the chapter assumes that technological knowledge exhibits several tacit elements and requires established connections to flow between countries. A new measure for knowledge spillovers is obtained by weighting international R&D stocks through bilateral trade flows. The country-level patenting activity is modelled through a knowledge production function. The sample includes 18 OECD countries over the 1990–2006 period. Estimates are obtained through panel data techniques.

Findings – Our econometric results show that international knowledge developed by other countries has positive effects on the focal country's innovation in renewable energy technologies. Cross-country linkages, rather than mere geographic proximity, are found to favour cross-country knowledge spillovers.

Impact – The research contributes to the design of energy innovation policies. Public R&D is confirmed to be a relevant input to energy innovation. Coordination between countries in energy R&D activities can be required, particularly when countries maintain mutual linkages.

Originality – This study adds empirical evidence on the effect of cross-country knowledge spillovers and on the channels through which technological knowledge diffuses globally. It contributes to the emerging empirical research on energy innovation.

Details

Entrepreneurship in the Global Firm
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-115-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Manoj Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to explore automobile fuel efficiency policies in the presence of two externalities: a global environmental problem and international…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore automobile fuel efficiency policies in the presence of two externalities: a global environmental problem and international innovation spillovers.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a simple model with two regions, the authors show that both a fuel tax and a tax on vehicles based on their fuel economy rating are needed to decentralize the first best.

Findings

If standards are used instead of taxes, the authors find that spillovers may alleviate free-riding. Under some conditions, a strict standard in one region may favor the adoption of a strict standard in the other one.

Originality/value

The authors also show that if policies are not coordinated between regions, the resulting gas taxes will be set too low and each region will use the tax on fuel rating to reduce the damage caused by foreign drivers.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 6000