Search results

1 – 10 of over 97000
Article
Publication date: 17 January 2022

Luis Diego Soto Kiewit and Bianca Vienni Baptista

This paper aims to analyse innovation models and interdisciplinarity in science, technology and innovation (STI) policy in Costa Rica between 2015 and 2021. The core focus…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse innovation models and interdisciplinarity in science, technology and innovation (STI) policy in Costa Rica between 2015 and 2021. The core focus is to evaluate the public policy in light of the groundwork that sustains the designed and proposed actions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors applied a qualitative approach to build a set of dimensions and conducted content-analysis of selected documents. The analysis encompasses all current STI public policy documents in Costa Rica, including the planning instruments of the Central Government and the National Policy on STI.

Findings

The main findings show that STI policy in Costa Rica is based on different innovation models, but the projects and instruments themselves show the predominance of the reductionist model. Innovation receives a residual role. In turn, interdisciplinarity is based on the concept of convergence, which limits disciplinary collaboration to the natural, physical and engineering sciences, minimising contributions from other fields of knowledge to an instrumental role in innovation processes.

Practical implications

The authors conclude that the interlinkage between open innovation models, the participation of diverse societal actors and the inclusion of an interdisciplinary perspective leads to inclusive and more democratic public policy, allowing more sectors and organisations to benefit from innovation processes. This would imply a greater reach and impact of the policy, conditions that translate into innovation achievements and a better return on public investment.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to current discussions on STI policy by studying the implications of the link among policies, innovation models and interdisciplinarity.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Taeyoung Park and Jun youn Kim

This study aims to investigate the evolution of eight Asian countries’ innovation policy instruments during three economic development phases. Another goal is to examine…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the evolution of eight Asian countries’ innovation policy instruments during three economic development phases. Another goal is to examine common and different policy instruments of Japan, Korea and China, which have already reached the post-catch-up stage, to provide lessons to less-developed and developing Asian countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a qualitative research methodology, in particular a narrative approach. For triangulation, this paper uses a wide range of secondary data. The authors selected eight Asian countries by using various criteria, including income level and market size, and examined each country in terms of innovation performance and evolution of innovation policy instruments. The evolution of innovation policy in each country is investigated during three economic development phases: pre-industrialization, industrialization and catch-up and post-catch-up.

Findings

The findings show, first, that a higher research and development (R&D) expenditure as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP), R&D activities dominated by private research organizations and more vigorous patent activities by residents than nonresidents are the most critical factors for becoming a high-income country. Second, innovation policy should be suitable for attaining aims, which are different at each economic development stage. Third, seven lessons from three prosperous Asian countries are crucial for economic development: securing political stability; increasing R&D expenditures; facilitating the acquisition, diffusion and internalization of technology; encouraging government–industry–university collaborations; using the selection and concentration strategy; changing the governmental role from regulator to facilitator; and establishing a legal framework.

Originality/value

It is difficult to find research that systematically compares three or more Asian countries’ innovation policies over the long term. This study fills this gap and helps scholars and field workers increase their understanding of innovation policy in eight Asian countries. It also contributes to providing lessons for practitioners that could help developing and less-developed Asian countries establish a suitable innovation policy for each economic development stage.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Zhang Yong’an, Geng Zhe and Tian Jie

Science and technology innovation policy has important strategic significance with respect to the promotion of an innovation orientation in our country, and the…

Abstract

Purpose

Science and technology innovation policy has important strategic significance with respect to the promotion of an innovation orientation in our country, and the classification and measurement of regional science and technology innovation policy urgently require research attention.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, we use text mining and principal component analysis to analyze the classification and measurement of technology innovation policy based on data obtained from Zhongguancun Science Park.

Findings

The empirical results indicate that regional science and technology innovation policy can be divided into four types: authoritative, guiding, urgent and periodical. The key measurements are function type, intensity, resource supply, funding level and funding effectiveness.

Originality/value

A comparative analysis is performed to investigate the different types of regional science and technology innovation policy measurement. Additionally, the study’s limitations are discussed, and future research directions are proposed.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Felipa de Mello‐Sampayo, Sofia de Sousa‐Vale, Francisco Camões and Orlando Gomes

The purpose of this paper is to explain how eventual pressures from national lobbies may lead governments to shift from an optimal into a non‐optimal innovation policy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain how eventual pressures from national lobbies may lead governments to shift from an optimal into a non‐optimal innovation policy.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model is developed in order to examine and explain the growth and welfare effects of optimal and non‐optimal innovation policies. The non‐optimal policy corresponds to a subsidy for national innovators that is equivalent to an optimal policy of incentives (tax cuts) to foreign investors. Since we are assessing what can nationals do with the support that could be oriented to foreign firms, we are measuring what the economy loses for not supporting foreign firms.

Findings

The authors find welfare loss when supporting national R&D instead of foreign R&D and conclude that the same support given to innovation can produce strikingly different outcomes depending on who receives the support.

Practical implications

The analysis allows the impact of the inefficiency caused by policies that are not sound, from a strictly economic point of view, to be measured.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper is related to the assessment of the implications and to the measurement of the effects of non‐optimal R&D policies.

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Synnøve Rubach, Thomas Hoholm and Håkan Håkansson

The purpose of this paper is to present a longitudinal case study of a regional innovation policy initiative, in which ideas with regard to how innovation might be…

3103

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a longitudinal case study of a regional innovation policy initiative, in which ideas with regard to how innovation might be facilitated were changing over time. Through the scrutiny of insights in industrial network studies (IMP), the authors seek to shed light on the challenges created by policy interventions aimed at constructing complementary networks for the facilitation of innovation. That is to say, the authors endeavour to understand the interfaces between innovation networks and industrial networks, and the way in which they may influence innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on a longitudinal case study of four successive regional innovation projects in Norway. Data are drawn from relevant policy documents and project documentations, as well as from participatory observation of application processes and project activities.

Findings

This study shows that regional innovation policy concerns first and foremost the interaction within and between relatively established diverse networks, which affects both structuring and restructuring. Changes in innovation policy required the re-configuring of constellations of business networks, research networks and policy networks. All initiatives required mobilisation input by persistent actors – often boundary organisations or researchers. The construction of innovation networks served as an instrument in the production of new interfaces between businesses, researchers and policy makers. The use and usefulness of these networks as perceived by the business actors were heavily influenced by the way in which the networks were configured.

Research limitations/implications

Generalisation based on in-depth qualitative case research requires further testing across similar and varying cases, and there have hitherto been relatively few studies of the interfaces between industrial and innovation networks. Despite this it can be argued that the conceptual distinction between constructed and emerging networks is a productive one in the study of networked innovation dynamics. During the research into this longitudinal case, it has been interesting to observe the way in which innovation research, and thus its influence on innovation policy, has changed over time. It would be beneficial if further studies were to be conducted on the way in which this has played out.

Practical implications

The administration of the public funding of innovation network activities requires great care. Where innovation policy initiatives are closely related to established industrial networks, it may be possible to strengthen innovation dynamics, challenge established practices and conceptions, and contribute to expanding, or even initiate innovation activities. In the first place, new activities need to be initiated in a way that supports the long-term development of actual business networks; and second, innovation policy bodies should be prepared to stimulate activity over longer periods of time.

Originality/value

This paper engages in, and combines, two parallel and rarely interacting debates on, respectively, innovation within innovation policy (innovation systems, clusters, networks) and industrial network studies (IMP and others). The authors make an “ideal type” distinction between alternative “constructed” networks and “emerging” networks, and the way in which they influence innovations.

Details

IMP Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-1403

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Arturo Vega, David Brown and Mike Chiasson

The purpose of this paper is to explore, through the use of a multidisciplinary lens, the policy context and the scope for improvements in university‐based public…

4943

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore, through the use of a multidisciplinary lens, the policy context and the scope for improvements in university‐based public programmes focused on improving innovation in small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the street‐level bureaucracy (SLB), combined with the systems of innovation approach (SIA) and diagnostic analysis (DA) to understand the context components that impact on public programme services. The study is part of a research programme oriented to the diffusion of information systems in SMEs and which used original interview‐based programme support case studies, interviews with regional policy managers, and documentation relating to the policy system and different public programmes. Although the empirical work was UK and European Union centric the results of the research have wide applicability.

Findings

The paper establishes the importance of programme contexts for diagnosing and providing a basis for public programme improvements. It further demonstrates the robustness of the context analysis framework to provide insights into proposed policy changes. The responsibility of improving programme contexts relies on actors that operate outside programme organisations, for instance EU funding bodies, government departments in charge of SME policies, public‐private partnerships, and private evaluators. Given this complexity it is suggested that SME associations have a potentially important role in increasing participation by SMEs in the public programme for innovation and knowledge support policy. Despite possible policy changes the requirement for public programme support for innovation and hence the role of universities as programme providers is confirmed and expanded.

Research limitations/implications

The results demonstrate the value of a multidisciplinary framework to analyse programme interventions at both macro and micro levels and provide a basis for programme policy and policy implementation improvements.

Originality/value

This research is a novel attempt to use the SLB, SIA and DA to public programme university‐based interventions in SMEs and SME policies in general. It complements extant research on open innovation and knowledge exchange by extending the concept of public programme contexts. Beneficiaries of the findings include policy makers, programme organisations, universities, SME associations, and researchers.

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Lars-Erik Gadde and Frida Lind

Previous studies of innovation policy claim that there is a mismatch between the underlying assumptions of these policies and the reality of how firms involved in…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies of innovation policy claim that there is a mismatch between the underlying assumptions of these policies and the reality of how firms involved in innovation operate. The purpose of this paper is to deepen the knowledge of actual innovation processes in order to contribute to the modification of innovation policies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on: a literature study focusing on the criticism and suggestions for revision of mainstream policy; and two empirical illustrations of innovation through interactive resource development. The framework is rooted in the industrial marketing and purchasing (IMP) approach to innovation, implying that a potential innovation needs to be embedded in three network settings – the developing, the producing and the using settings.

Findings

The study shows that effective policy requires a modified perspective on the basic mechanisms behind innovation. First, the paper emphasises the central role of inter-organisational interaction for the outcome of innovation processes. Second, it shows that the embedding of an innovation in its business context requires the joint efforts of several organisations. Third, implementation of a potential innovation is a time-demanding process.

Practical implications

The implementation of a potential innovation requires close connections in relationships and networks. Policy practitioners therefore increasingly need to take these constellations into account. Furthermore, time frames must be extended to take long-term effects into consideration.

Originality/value

The framing of innovation as “interactive resource development” reflects the criticism of innovation policy identified in the literature study. The IMP approach applied in the empirical illustrations of these phenomena was useful for providing suggestions for modifications of current innovation policy.

Details

IMP Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-1403

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Allison Bramwell, Nicola Hepburn and David A. Wolfe

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate experimentation over time in Ontario, Canada with place-based innovation policies to support the development and coordination of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate experimentation over time in Ontario, Canada with place-based innovation policies to support the development and coordination of entrepreneurial ecosystems on a regional basis across the province.

Design/methodology/approach

Tracing the policy learning process and successive adaptations in program design over time, the authors provide a detailed case study of the evolution of the Ontario Network of Entrepreneurs (ONE) from 2003 to the present.

Findings

The authors find that the program has evolved in response to regular program reviews that include broad input from ecosystem actors operating at multiple levels within the network, and that intermediaries are key facilitators of inter- and intra-ecosystem linkages. However, program complexity and coordination challenges suggest that place-based innovation policies, such as the ONE, should focus specifically on innovation-intensive entrepreneurship.

Research limitations/implications

These findings make three contributions to the theory and practice of place-based innovation policy. First, these policies are by nature experimental because they must be able to flexibly adapt according to policy learning and practitioner input from a wide variety of local contexts. Second, multilevel interactions between provincial policymakers and regional ecosystem actors indicate that place-based innovation policy is neither entirely driven by “top down” policy, nor “bottom up” networks but is rather a complex and variable “hybrid” blend of the two. Finally, publicly funded intermediaries perform essential inter- and intra-ecosystem connective functions but system fragmentation and “mission creep” remain enduring policy challenges.

Originality/value

The paper makes an original contribution to the literature by analyzing the development of entrepreneurial policy support framework and situating the case study in the context of the policy learning process involved in place-based innovation policymaking in North America.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 97000