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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Grazia Garlatti Costa, Darija Aleksić and Guido Bortoluzzi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the inverted U-shaped relationship that exists between exploitative leadership styles and innovation implementation. In…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the inverted U-shaped relationship that exists between exploitative leadership styles and innovation implementation. In addition, drawing on the social cognitive theory, the paper explores the effect of the three-way interaction between exploitative leadership style (ELS), work–family balance (WFB) and family-friendly workplace practices (FFWPs) on innovation implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study of 440 employees from 38 medium and large companies based in Italy and Croatia was conducted, using an online survey. The proposed hypotheses were tested using hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

The results show that there is an inverted U-shaped curvilinear relationship between ELS and innovation implementation. Furthermore, the findings support the existence of the three-way interaction suggesting that the combination of high-level WFB and high-level FFWPs strengthens the relationship between ELS² and innovation implementation.

Originality/value

This is the first contribution that examines a curvilinear relationship between ELS and innovation implementation. Additionally, it contributes to the work–family literature by providing the first empirical examination of the joint impact of WFB and FFWPs in enhancing innovation implementation. Our results suggest that individuals who perceive a high level of WFB and who work in an organization with family-friendly practices are more accepting of an exploitative leader, and that the positive feelings from the family domain encourage the implementation of innovation. These results may change the attitudes of managers, encouraging them to consider WFB and FFWPs as important for the implementation of innovation.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Shiwangi Singh, Sanjay Dhir, Ansh Gupta, Vellupillai Mukunda Das and Anuj Sharma

Assessing the antecedents of innovation implementation holds importance for companies, as previous studies have shown that without proper implementation the innovation is…

Abstract

Purpose

Assessing the antecedents of innovation implementation holds importance for companies, as previous studies have shown that without proper implementation the innovation is doomed to fail. Over the past few years, research on innovation implementation is growing. However, the evidence on the antecedents of innovation implementation is inconsistent. The purpose of the study is to conduct a review of the literature using meta-analysis to summarize the divergent views present in the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

A meta-analysis technique is adopted for reviewing the literature. The literature search was conducted with selected keywords in different databases and top journals from the ABDC list (A* and A).

Findings

The results of the meta-analysis that summarize evidence from 42 papers, 100 effect sizes and 32,223 organizations show the significance and homogeneous/heterogeneous opinions of the past studies. Results reveal the homogeneity in antecedents such as transformational leadership, business collaboration, employee competency, leader competency, absorptive capacity and business size and heterogeneity in the antecedents such as communication, customer collaboration, internal entrainment, external entrainment, implementation climate and strategic resources.

Research limitations/implications

The results imply that managers attempting to implement innovation in the organizations need to first focus on homogenous antecedents followed by heterogeneous antecedents for successful implementation.

Originality/value

This study advocates research on innovation implementation. It tests the significance, nature of the relationship and summarizes the divergent views on antecedents of innovation implementation in an organization. The results of this study can also be used in the theoretical advancement of management innovation literature.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Todd Dewett, Nathan C. Whittier and Scott David Williams

The management literature has extensively discussed innovation diffusion as an essential part of corporate and economic competitiveness. However, most work centers on…

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Abstract

Purpose

The management literature has extensively discussed innovation diffusion as an essential part of corporate and economic competitiveness. However, most work centers on diffusion external to the organization. The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for understanding post adoption innovation implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

Research concerning diffusion inside the firm has focused almost exclusively on innovation creation as opposed to implementation. Although current definitions of innovation often make clear the internal/external distinction, the authors propose that it could be made more meaningful by further delineating the components of internal innovation diffusion. To that end, prominent innovation research is synthesized to explore innovation implementation.

Findings

A systematic review of the literature suggests three main types of influences on implementation: organizational, innovation, and human. Each represents unique challenges for innovation implementation.

Practical implications

The model presented here can serve as a useful organizing rubric for leaders attempting to facilitate change.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils a need for greater understanding of internal innovation implementation.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Nixon Muganda Ochara, John Kandiri and Roy Johnson

This research reports on how influence processes (IP) impact on the implementation effectiveness of information technology (IT) projects. Drawing on an innovation

Abstract

Purpose

This research reports on how influence processes (IP) impact on the implementation effectiveness of information technology (IT) projects. Drawing on an innovation perspective that elevate the interplay of factors related to innovations framing, innovations environment and innovation attributes, the study focused on IT projects based in Africa that are generally classified as “challenged” due to the conditions in the environment. The purpose of this paper is to assess how IP related to innovation framing, innovation environment and innovation attributes can be used to determine implementation effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a interpretive approach, a case study of institutions under a partnership that has been implementing various educational technologies in five African countries formed the sample. In all, 25 interviews of top-management representatives, project leaders and user representatives were conducted between 2012 and 2013 to assess the implementation effectiveness of these projects. Theoretical thematic analysis, based on a deductive approach, was employed to analyse the data.

Findings

The results show that a majority of these development-oriented projects are “mandated failures” characterized by high framing, a bad internal environment and typically negative innovation attributes. That typically, the institutions engage symbolically in such innovations initiatives which are regarded as “show” projects. Such behaviour can be construed to be a pattern of cynical technology adoption linked to the appeasement of external stakeholders. In addition, participation in initiatives was largely symbolic and is considered as a mere demonstration of a modern organization that is technologically aware, yet the requisite innovation environment is lacking for effective appropriation of the technology. Third, mandated failures result in low morale of employees, who regard themselves as pawns in the process which make them grudgingly participate in the implementation process.

Practical implications

These findings have implications for managing innovations in such challenged environments: the first proposition is that projects in challenged environment for innovation adopting organizations need to be considered as technology transfer projects. Second, the innovation environment and attributes can only be improved during implementation of the conditions related to absorptive capacity of the organization and the individual are addressed.

Originality/value

The research reported in this paper, provides an empirical determination of the concept of implementation effectiveness by using three constructs of innovations framing, environment and attributes. On the basis of the empirical findings, an original contribution is claimed, especially in “challenged” IT project environments where the concept of success if fluid and outcomes uncertain.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 December 2021

Salina V. Thijssen, Maria J.G. Jacobs, Rachelle R. Swart, Luca Heising, Carol X.J. Ou and Cheryl Roumen

This study aimed to identify the barriers and facilitators related to the implementation of radical innovations in secondary healthcare.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to identify the barriers and facilitators related to the implementation of radical innovations in secondary healthcare.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review was conducted and presented in accordance with a PRISMA flowchart. The databases PubMed and Web of Science were searched for original publications in English between the 1st of January 2010 and 6th of November 2020. The level of radicalness was determined based on five characteristics of radical innovations. The level of evidence was classified according to the level of evidence scale of the University of Oxford. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research was used as a framework to classify the barriers and facilitators.

Findings

Based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, nine publications were included, concerning six technological, two organizational and one treatment innovation. The main barriers for radical innovation implementation in secondary healthcare were lack of human, material and financial resources, and lack of integration and organizational readiness. The main facilitators included a supportive culture, sufficient training, education and knowledge, and recognition of the expected added value.

Originality/value

To our knowledge, this is the first systematic review examining the barriers and facilitators of radical innovation implementation in secondary healthcare. To ease radical innovation implementation, alternative performance systems may be helpful, including the following prerequisites: (1) Money, (2) Added value, (3) Timely knowledge and integration, (4) Culture, and (5) Human resources (MATCH). This study highlights the need for more high-level evidence studies in this area.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Kevin Real and Marshall Scott Poole

This chapter develops a framework for classifying approaches to conceptualizing and measuring implementation of innovations. It first develops a typology that…

Abstract

This chapter develops a framework for classifying approaches to conceptualizing and measuring implementation of innovations. It first develops a typology that distinguishes rollout, modification, programmatic and transformation conceptualizations of implementation. The implications of each conceptualization for measurement of implementation are discussed. Following this a classification scheme for implementation measures is presented that distinguishes measures on the basis of their: (a) criterion for success of the implementation; (b) innovation unit; (c) source of data; (d) measurement scale; and (e) level of analysis. Issues related to various measurement choices are discussed along with recommendations for future research and development in the measurement of implementation.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-167-5

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2021

Shiwangi Singh and Sanjay Dhir

The paper aims to identify, analyse and develop a model for measuring the inter-relationship and interaction among the antecedents influencing innovation implementation

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to identify, analyse and develop a model for measuring the inter-relationship and interaction among the antecedents influencing innovation implementation. The extant literature has not widely studied the interactions and inter-relationships among the antecedents of innovation implementation. To fill this gap, the paper develops a hierarchical relationship framework between the identified antecedents of innovation implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study follows mixed method-based approach using two methodologies: modified total interpretive structural modelling (m-TISM) and MICMAC (Matriced’ Impacts Croisés Multiplication Appliquée á un Classement) analysis. m-TISM is used for the purpose of establishing the hierarchical relationship among the antecedents. MICMAC analysis is used to study the driver-dependent relationship. To identify the antecedents of innovation implementation, the paper follows a systematic search method found in the review articles. The article search was performed across different databases including Google Scholar, Web of Science, EBSCO and Scopus.

Findings

In this study, eight innovation implementation antecedents are identified. The analysis indicates that competency antecedents such as leader competency and employee competency, having high driving and weak dependence power, are at the lowest level in the hierarchical model, whereas, innovation implementation, having high dependence and low driving power, is at the highest level in the hierarchical model. Strategic resources act as a linkage variable.

Research limitations/implications

Although this study summarizes the extant literature to generalize the findings, the future studies can focus upon statistical validation of model by employing structural equation modelling to generalize the results.

Practical implications

The practitioners must emphasize on antecedents having strong driving power for successful implementation of innovation. The hierarchical model is proposed for implementing innovation successfully that will help organizations to be more competitive, productive and profitable.

Originality/value

In this study, m-TISM and MICMAC-based hierarchical models are proposed for implementing innovation successfully in organizations. It also provides the variables insights such as driver-dependent interrelationship between the identified antecedents.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

John Øvretveit, Magna Andreen‐Sachs, Jan Carlsson, Helena Gustafsson, Johan Hansson, Christina Keller, Susana Lofgren, Pamela Mazzocato, Sara Tolf and Mats Brommels

The purpose of this paper is to compare the implementation of 12 different organisation and management innovations (OMIs) in Swedish healthcare, to discover the generic…

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2096

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the implementation of 12 different organisation and management innovations (OMIs) in Swedish healthcare, to discover the generic and specific factors important for successful healthcare improvement change in a public health system.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal cross‐case comparison of 12 case studies was employed, where each case study used a common framework for collecting data about the process of change, the content of the change, the context, and the intermediate and final outcomes.

Findings

Clinical leaders played a more important part in the development of these successful service innovations than managers. Strategies for and patterns of change implementation were found to differ according to the type of innovation. Internal organisational context factors played a significant role in the development of nearly all, but external factors did not. “Developmental evolution” better described the change process than “implementation”.

Research limitations/implications

The 12 cases were all of relatively successful change processes: some unsuccessful examples would have provided additional testing of the hypotheses about what would predict successful innovation which were used in the case comparison. The cross‐case comparative hypothesis testing method allows systematic comparison if the case data are collected using similar frameworks, but this approach to management research requires considerable resources and coordination.

Practical implications

Management innovations that improve patient care can be carried out successfully by senior clinicians, under certain circumstances. A systematic approach is important both for developing and adapting an innovation to a changing situation. A significant amount of time was required for all involved, which could be reduced by “fast‐tracking” approval for some types of change.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical report comparing longitudinal and contextualised findings from a number of case studies of different organisational and management healthcare innovations. The findings made possible explanations for success factors and useful practical recommendations for conditions needed to nurture such innovation in public healthcare.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Haifen Lin, Mengya Chen and Jingqin Su

The purpose of this paper is to address how management innovations are implemented deeply at the most micro level of organizations, namely, organizational routines, or to…

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3128

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address how management innovations are implemented deeply at the most micro level of organizations, namely, organizational routines, or to investigate the process through which organizational routines evolve in implementing management innovations, with existing routines overturned and new routines created and solidified.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts an interpretive and exploratory case study on the case of Day-Definite (DD) innovation which has successfully brought Arima World Group Company Limited (HOAU) into a new value-added arena, in terms of timing, security and high service quality. Considering that DD innovation reflects a systematic innovation of the whole organization, this paper focuses on it to explore the complex implementation mechanism of management innovation. Multiple approaches were utilized during data collection to meet criteria for trustworthiness, including semi-structured interviews, archival data and observation; and the data analysis went through a five-step process.

Findings

The results confirm management innovation as a complex project concerning organizational routines which represent a central and fundamental element of organizations. Also, it finds that organizational routines evolve in innovation implementation through a three-phase process consisting of the existing-routine-domination phase, the new-routine-creation phase and -solidification phases, each exhibiting different innovation activities and characteristics of participants’ cognition and behaviors; recreation of new routines is the key for routine evolution, thus for success of management innovations.

Research limitations/implications

This research is constrained by several limitations. The set-up framework of organizational routine evolution in innovation implementation needs a further confirmation in more organizations; other elements, such as cognition of managers, resource orchestration, environmental elements or organizational culture, should be considered for the success of innovation implementation; and more attention should be paid to the potential power asymmetries among participants and its potential influence on forming shared schemata and subsequent new routines, besides interactions and role taking.

Originality/value

The findings offer some valuable insights for further research on management innovation and organizational routines and hold important implications for management practices. This research extends research on management innovation and the Kurt Lewin Change Theory and Change Model to explore innovation implementation at a most micro level; furthers research on organizational routines, especially routine dynamic theory, by holding the two-component view and exploring the process through which organizational routines evolve; and contributes to research on the relationship between organizational routines and innovations by taking an organizational routines’ perspective. It reminds managers of the depth and complication of innovation implementation.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Björn Michaelis, Ralf Stegmaier and Karlheinz Sonntag

The purpose of this paper is to provide a deeper understanding of how transformational leadership relates to followers' innovation implementation behavior, the…

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10373

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a deeper understanding of how transformational leadership relates to followers' innovation implementation behavior, the psychological mechanisms of this relationship, and the role of individual perceptions of climate for initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

Perceptual data were collected from 198 employees in lower and middle management positions of a multinational automotive corporation. Relationships were tested using hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

Results demonstrate that transformational leadership was strongly related to followers' innovation implementation behavior and that the nature of this relationship was moderated by followers' levels of perceived climate for initiative. Additionally, commitment to change fully mediated the relationship between transformational leadership and followers' innovation implementation behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on a cross‐sectional design. A causal interpretation requires studies with experimental or longitudinal designs.

Practical implications

Companies should invest in transformational leadership training and in the selection of supervisors with this leadership style before initiating the implementation of innovations. Enhancing contextual factors, such as a perceived climate for initiative, should be promoted by integrating them into organizations' reward systems.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first to investigate the relationship between transformational leadership and followers' innovation implementation behavior. It specifies the organizational contexts under which transformational leadership is most likely related to innovation implementation behavior, and those in which such a relationship is unlikely to occur.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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