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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2022

Faisal Iddris, Philip Opoku Mensah, Richard Asiedu and Henry Kofi Mensah

The purpose of this study was to examine students’ innovation capability in virtual team projects from the COVID-19 pandemic era.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine students’ innovation capability in virtual team projects from the COVID-19 pandemic era.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers conducted an empirical study and the data were collected from a total of 308 participants engaging in virtual team projects. A structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to assess the relationship of the conceptual framework.

Findings

The findings showed that virtual team culture positively influenced propensity to innovate. Also, knowledge management and communication influenced propensity to innovate through the mediation of support for innovation.

Practical implications

Developing a strategy for propensity to innovate in any organization demands that project team members should be able to seamlessly communicate. Developing knowledge management, communication and support for innovation strategy in a virtual team may prepare an organization for permanently different post-pandemic events and the future turbulent business environment.

Originality/value

This study highlights innovation capability for the propensity to innovate, a topic that is not widely researched, especially in the context of virtual teams.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2022

Yan Liu and Heng Xu

This paper aims to investigate the motivation for firms to innovate their products to be socially responsible in the presence of the spillover effect. The follower of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the motivation for firms to innovate their products to be socially responsible in the presence of the spillover effect. The follower of the innovation in corporate social responsibility (CSR) can benefit from the leader’s innovation by technological spillover. For instance, evidence can be found in the cosmetics industry (e.g. Lush Retail Ltd. and The Body Shop) and the market of hybrid electric vehicles (e.g. Toyota and Honda). Moreover, consumers may have different perceptions on the sequence of CSR innovation by firms, they may prefer more on the CSR product launched by the leader because they usually relate the desired stage to their interests when making a purchase decision. Therefore, the firms’ decision to be a leader of the CSR innovation depends on the trade-off between the loss in the spillover effect and the benefit of the first-mover advantage, which has not been considered by the existing literature. This paper explains the firms’ motivation on CSR innovation in a realistic situation where competing firms’ CSR programs are launched sequentially and sheds light on the private sector’s decision on strategy from the perspective on the social contribution, and provides some managerial implications about the competing firms’ strategies of launching the CSR innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors construct a two-period Hotelling model in which consumers are divided into two groups: the altruistic and normal consumers. The altruistic consumers have more willingness to pay for the CSR product while the normal consumers only care about the product performance improved by the firms’ CSR activities. Firms have the option to innovate their basic products to be socially responsible and make their decision on such CSR innovation sequentially. Moreover, the follower of the innovation can receive a spillover effect from the leader, meaning that there may exist a second-mover advantage in terms of innovation (the authors define this as a spillover effect), but in the meanwhile, the altruistic consumers value more on the CSR product sold by the leader than that by the follower (the authors define this as a preference-reduction effect). This implies that the firm can benefit in the production process from being a second-mover of the CSR innovation but may lose its first-mover advantage in terms of the preference-reduction effect. By finding and analyzing the sub-game perfect Nash equilibrium, the authors try to figure out the firms’ decisions on CSR innovation in various situations.

Findings

The authors find that the firms’ motivation of CSR innovation crucially depends on the fraction of the altruistic consumers, as well as the spillover effect and the preference-reduction effect. A large (small) fraction of the altruistic consumers attracts (restricts) both the leader and the follower to engage in CSR innovation. More importantly, when such fraction is not too large but stays at a relatively high level, a potential leader of the CSR innovation may not wish to innovate. Hence, the potential follower may be the monopolist in the market of the socially responsible product. In addition, the authors reexamine this result in a variation model where a leader can make its decision on the CSR innovation to be more flexible by allowing it can innovate in either periods 1 or 2. The authors demonstrate that when the fraction of the altruistic consumers falls in an intermediate range, the leader may wish to delay the CSR innovation to period 2. In such a case, the leader of the CSR innovation may tend to trade its first-mover advantage for head-to-head competition with the follower and prevents the follower from benefiting from the spillover effect. Moreover, a flexible choice on the CSR innovation brings greater initiative to a firm to be the leader of the innovation.

Originality/value

Nearly all the studies about firms’ decisions on CSR innovation are conducted in an environment of simultaneous move, which is not appropriate to describe the real business world; many pieces of evidence show that many CSR programs are launched sequentially rather than simultaneously. The theory identifies a couple of important factors of the CSR innovation in a more realistic situation, i.e. sequential more on CSR innovation. Both spillover effect and preference-reduction effect crucially affect the firms’ decision on innovating their products to be socially responsible, which contributes to the existing literature in CSR and strategic decision. This paper also sheds some light on managerial implications with CSR innovation under various situations of competition.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Abubakr Suliman

The purpose of this paper to aim at exploring the links between employees’ perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactional justice on one hand and innovation…

1633

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper to aim at exploring the links between employees’ perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactional justice on one hand and innovation climate and readiness to innovate on the other hand. The role of innovation climate in predicting readiness to innovate is also examined. Further, the study attempts to test the mediating role of innovation climate in justice-readiness to innovate relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper aims at exploring the links between employees’ perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactional justice on one hand and innovation climate and readiness to innovate on the other hand. The role of innovation climate in predicting readiness to innovate is also examined. Further, the study attempts to test the mediating role of innovation climate in justice-readiness to innovate relationship.

Findings

The findings revealed that perception of justice played a key role in employees’ perception of innovation climate. Innovation climate was found to be positively and significantly related to readiness to innovate. Employees’ readiness to try new ways of doing things and question the existing habits of the work tended to show significant and positive relationship to organizational justice. Innovation climate played a significant yet a partial role in mediating the link between justice and readiness to innovate.

Research limitations/implications

The sample represented only governmental sector and only one emirate of the UAE's seven emirates. The implications of the findings for researchers together with some future guidelines are discussed in the paper.

Practical implications

The paper provides practitioners with some advice about understanding and managing justice and innovation.

Originality/value

The paper is the first study in the UAE and the Middle East that examines the links between justice, innovation climate and readiness to innovate.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Kazem Chaharbaghi and Victor Newman

By treating work as socially constructed and innovating as integrated learning, organizations can create new knowledge, models and tools and acquire new experiences to…

2579

Abstract

By treating work as socially constructed and innovating as integrated learning, organizations can create new knowledge, models and tools and acquire new experiences to achieve the result they desire in support of their survival and growth. Provides a framework for innovating, and demonstrates the way in which different types of individuals and learning can contribute towards innovating within organizations.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Xin Xie

This paper studies strategic R&D policy with endogenous timing of firms’ moves within a two‐period framework. Within this framework the government can make a policy…

917

Abstract

This paper studies strategic R&D policy with endogenous timing of firms’ moves within a two‐period framework. Within this framework the government can make a policy commitment only in the second period due to an information lag vis‐à‐vis the firms. The firms can, if they choose, make their moves in the first period, but they will incur extra costs. An activist government policy may decrease national welfare by forcing the foreign firm to take preemptive action against the home government.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Eleonora Pantano

The innovation success requires a deep understanding of risks and benefits of the process, as well as of the best moment for innovating. The purpose of this paper is to…

2705

Abstract

Purpose

The innovation success requires a deep understanding of risks and benefits of the process, as well as of the best moment for innovating. The purpose of this paper is to explore the current retailers’ choice of innovating in terms of being the first innovator imitating competitors’ innovations, by declining the benefits and risks associated with the both strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on qualitative data from retail industry, with emphasis on fashion (including clothes, jewelry, and accessories), the investigation provides an empirical contribution to the emerging area on innovation management in retailing through its in-depth investigation of the strategies of eight case retailers who introduced technological innovations in the last three years, and by mapping the patterns between strategy and outcomes.

Findings

The analysis revealed how pioneers and followers acted their strategies for achieving benefits and reducing the encountered risks. In particular, findings identify to what extend pioneers act according the technology push and followers according to the demand pull.

Originality/value

The research starts from the definition of the time choice of innovating, and the subsequent choice of being the first innovation adopter or the imitator. The insights support scholarly exploration of innovation management by offering a new marketing management perspective, and providing practitioners with a better understanding on the time choice for innovating in retailing and also in broader empirical settings.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Gaetano Martino, Enrica Rossetti, Andrea Marchini and Angelo Frascarelli

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of the modes of organizing the technological knowledge (make, buy and hybrid organization) in the decision to innovate

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of the modes of organizing the technological knowledge (make, buy and hybrid organization) in the decision to innovate the production process.

Design/methodology/approach

The study first develops a conceptual framework drawing the concept of mode of organization from the Transaction Cost Economics. The three research questions are coherently formulated which concern: the influence of the modes of organization on the decision to innovate and to invest in supporting instruments; the variability of this influence and the complementarity degree between the decision to innovate and to invest. The empirical analysis is carried out with respect to the olive oil sector considering a representative sample of olive millers (Umbria, Central Italy) and a complementary accidental sample drawn from an existing database.

Findings

The main results of the study provide evidence for the role of modes of organization in the knowledge acquisition finalized to the process innovation. The role of the “buy” option is important, while the collaboration – the “hybrid” organization – seems to influence strongly the innovation and the related investment decision. The important role of the information sources appears effective and articulated. Finally, despite the great economic importance of the quality requirements, the millers appear to be more sensitive to the difficulties to build up a clear process vision in terms of technology.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of the study is that it refers to a specific supply system including small enterprises and does not account for the pattern of innovation in other olive oil production systems. Moreover, one of the samples that was observed and analyzed is accidental in nature and does not allow a clear and robust comparison for the representative sample.

Practical implications

The findings of this study can contribute to the identification of organizational constraints to the rate on process innovation.

Originality/value

The originality of the study is based on the main focus, i.e. the attention to the role of the modes of organization in the decision to innovate, which provides complementary information to the extant literature on the choice of modes of organizing the technological knowledge acquisition. Moreover, the conceptual framework and findings are connected to the current research on the variety of the agribusiness organizations which is still a partially explored field of inquiry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Vijay Gupta and Bindu Gupta

This research study identifies the factors influencing innovation and technology management in Indian manufacturing small- and medium -sized enterprises (SMEs) with a…

2010

Abstract

Purpose

This research study identifies the factors influencing innovation and technology management in Indian manufacturing small- and medium -sized enterprises (SMEs) with a focus on the auto-ancillary sector. The study further investigates the impact of types of innovation on business performance. The purpose of this paper is to come up with a flexible strategic framework for managing innovation and technology in SMEs from a perspective of continuity and change.

Design/methodology/approach

The data on which this study is based were generated through secondary research using published sources and primary research. The study was done through group discussions with industry experts and personally focused interviews with 88 entrepreneurs from SMEs selected using a structured questionnaire.

Findings

The study shows SMEs pursuing more types of innovations display higher performance levels when compared to those pursuing fewer types of innovations. SMEs pursuing more types of innovations are significantly different from less innovating firms from the perspective of underlying change forces.

Originality/value

This research paper represents one of the few efforts to study innovation and technology management in SMEs and come up with a flexible strategic framework for managing forces of continuity and change for guiding this sector for long-term survival and growth. The flexible framework suggested, and the continuity and change matrix (C-C matrix), can be of interest to researchers and practising managers to validate the applicability for other sectors. The framework suggested can be adapted for application in a global context.

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2022

Jun Jin, Shijing Li, Zan Chen and Liying Wang

Although scholars in strategic management have identified innovating and exit as firms’ two sequential strategic responses to long-run crisis, the potential…

Abstract

Purpose

Although scholars in strategic management have identified innovating and exit as firms’ two sequential strategic responses to long-run crisis, the potential interdependency has yet remained implicit. Specifically, in the context of Chinese Privately Owned Enterprises (POEs), this study investigates the interrelationship of these two strategic responses during long-run crisis. Building on resource redeployment perspective, the authors propose that firms tend to simultaneously leverage innovating and exit responses.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the data from the 2010 Chinese POEs survey to verify how firms in the long-term crisis made strategic responses after the 2008 financial crisis. Besides, the authors utilize Probit regressions as the basic analysis and further employ bivariate Probit regressions to conduct robustness tests.

Findings

This study provides empirical evidence confirming that firms in the long-run period of the crisis tend to adopt both exit and innovating strategies at the same time, that is, the strategy of resource redeployment. Moreover, this study further finds that government subsidies, the degree of marketization and firm’s organizational capability could all accentuate the decision-making of firms’ resource redeployment.

Originality/value

The authors thus contribute to the study of strategic responses to crisis in strategic management by dynamically find out the interdependency of two responses and enrich the research on resource redeployment perspective by identifying three influential positive antecedents, adding to the ongoing investigation on positive drivers of resource redeployment.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2022

Mariasole Bannò, Giorgia Maria D'Allura, Emilia Filippi and Sandro Trento

This study examines the propensity to innovate in automation of family firms (FFs) based on the socio-emotional wealth (SEW) perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the propensity to innovate in automation of family firms (FFs) based on the socio-emotional wealth (SEW) perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This study’s analysis is based on three aspects. First, the authors consider three main non-economic goals and priorities of FFs: the family’s relationship with employees (read as to care for their satisfaction and well-being); the inner pride of building and maintaining the family and firm image and reputation; and the inner feeling to be socially responsible. Second, the authors consider how these goals and priorities vary among FFs according to four dimensions: family ownership, the presence of family members on the board of directors, the involvement of young successors, and the presence of founding and later generations. Finally, the consequences of automation are considered: lower firm employment, lower employees’ satisfaction and well-being, and higher firm productivity. The analysis is based on a sample of 4,150 Italian firms.

Findings

The analysis revealed that FFs are less prone to innovate in automation than non-FFs. Specifically, family ownership, the presence of family members on the board of directors, and the presence of founding generation are negatively associated with innovation in automation. Instead, the involvement of young successors and the presence of later generation are positively associated with innovation in automation.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first investigation that, based on SEW, examines how FFs act on the decision to innovate in automation, thereby providing empirical evidence.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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