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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Patrik Nordin, Anna-Aurora Kork and Inka Koskela

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the potential of organizational learning for developing effectiveness of care. Value-based healthcare measurement recognizes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the potential of organizational learning for developing effectiveness of care. Value-based healthcare measurement recognizes patient value as a driver for improving health outcomes at the societal and individual levels. By using the action learning method, this paper examines the phases of organizational learning in a private healthcare organization that has developed a novel Big Data screening tool for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2).

Design/methodology/approach

Relying on triple-loop learning as a conceptual framework and by applying the action learning method to case study design, this paper illustrates the phases of organizational learning and efforts to utilize value-based measurement in healthcare.

Findings

The case organization was able to identify patients at risk and to improve their care balance. Although the results for the measurement of patient outcomes led to questioning of previous care processes and practices in the organization, increasing value for all stakeholders by incorporating social needs to business opportunities remains under process.

Originality/value

With the focus on organizational learning and organizational value creation processes, this paper demonstrates incorporation of measuring patient outcomes in re-structuring care processes, enhancing organizational performance and improving effectiveness as well as quality of care.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Inka Koskela and Hannele Palukka

This paper aims to identify methods of guidance and supervision used in air traffic control training. It also aims to show how these methods facilitate trainee…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify methods of guidance and supervision used in air traffic control training. It also aims to show how these methods facilitate trainee participation in core work activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies the tools of conversation analysis and ethnomethodology to explore the ways in which trainers and trainees act and interact in training situations. The data consist of the video recordings (total 38 hours) and ethnographic material gathered at a vocational institute for aviation and in two aerodrome control tower units.

Findings

The trainers used five different instructional strategies with which they guided and controlled the trainees' actions. In simulator training, learning was structured as a process through which the procedural knowledge possessed by the expert controllers was transferred to the trainees through interventions such as orders, test questions and additions. As the trainees progressed to the on‐the‐job training phase, interaction evolved from being trainer‐driven to trainer‐guided. The trainees' performance was fine‐tuned and guided towards local practices of particular work position by means of instructions and information deliveries.

Practical implications

The simulator training and on‐the‐job training appear as two distinctive forms of vocational training with their own aims. In order to improve the quality of the training, it is suggested that greater attention should be given to the ways in which these two separate areas of learning could be better reconciled.

Originality/value

This ethnomethodological study on training interaction complements the understanding of instructional strategies used at different stages of air traffic control training. It is proposed that research into the local and social production of training interaction can shed useful light on the complexities of workplace learning and training interaction, providing a novel perspective for those engaged in practice of vocational education.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Sara Cervai and Tauno Kekäle

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360

Abstract

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Sari Tähtinen, Inka Kojo and Suvi Nenonen

This paper aims to present empirical testing of an experience-based usability framework to study an urban area. The framework is applied to the Punavuori neighbourhood in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present empirical testing of an experience-based usability framework to study an urban area. The framework is applied to the Punavuori neighbourhood in Helsinki, Finland, to understand the issues that make this neighbourhood attractive to its users.

Design/methodology/approach

The experience-based usability framework for an urban area study is the 6T-model of experience of place, which was developed by combining service and experience design tools and methods as well as former research to assess the user’s experience. The framework is tested by analysing data gathered from documents, a walkthrough of the neighbourhood and interviews.

Findings

This paper interprets users’ experiences of the Punavuori area using the 6T-model to capture new perspectives on user-centric urban design and the management of places. The identified connections can be a starting point for investigations into users’ experiences as a part of the usability of an urban area.

Research limitations/implications

The results represent a beginning study into the usability and the usability experience of individuals in the built environment. The preliminary testing of the experience framework is used as a framework for the analysis of the secondary data. The user data have not been gathered in the broadest sense.

Practical implications

The results can be used in other experience-based research for (re-)design an existing or new area that attracts new inhabitants and business. The results can be applied by urban planners as well as place managers.

Originality/value

The identified points of connection provide a valuable approach to capture and discuss about user experiences in complex urban context.

Details

Facilities, vol. 34 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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