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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Aleksandr M. Kitsis and Injazz J. Chen

Drawing on multi-theoretical lenses and a combination of supply chain and business ethics literature, this study aims to investigate the role of motives in driving…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on multi-theoretical lenses and a combination of supply chain and business ethics literature, this study aims to investigate the role of motives in driving sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) practices and sustainable performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 205 supply chain companies in the USA, the authors apply structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis to empirically test the proposed model and seven hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Results of the study underscore the critical role of moral motives, while highlighting that all three types of motives (instrumental, relational and moral) are robust in driving SSCM practices and achieving improvement in all three dimensions of sustainable performance–economic, environmental and social.

Research limitations/implications

This research can help supply chain scholars develop a more robust subfield of motivation-based SSCM research to gain a deeper understanding of how motives may differentially predict sustainable supply chain practices and performance.

Practical implications

The results of this study demonstrate the critical links between moral motivation and the triple bottom line (TBL) performance and suggest that managers pay more attention to moral motives in their decision-making.

Originality/value

This study bridges gaps in the extant literature by incorporating motivation-based antecedents, expanding the scope of SSCM practices, including the social dimension of sustainability and investigating the mediating effects of SSCM practices on the links between motives and the TBL performance.

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Injazz J. Chen and Aleksandr M. Kitsis

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework and propositions to advance research and practice in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM). Performance indicators…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework and propositions to advance research and practice in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM). Performance indicators (economic, environmental, and social) identified in the paper aim to facilitate empirical testing of a range of theoretical models derived or extended from the stated propositions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study of SSCM is truly complicated, and there is no one theory that applies in all instances. The authors analyzed over 200 critical articles published in major supply chain management and sustainability-based journals and grounded the proposed framework in a multi-theoretical perspective.

Findings

SSCM implementation entails linking stakeholder pressures, moral motives, and management commitment with relational practices. The paper further elucidates how relational practices, when bundled together, can create a set of relational capabilities, which in turn transform stakeholder pressures into sustainable outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The research framework contributes to SSCM theory building insofar as it can be expanded into various theoretical models, allowing researchers to empirically test the links among SSCM drivers, management commitment, and relational capabilities, along with their individual or collective impact on supply chain performance.

Practical implications

The framework provides a roadmap for firms to develop and nurture relational capabilities while dealing with growing stakeholder pressures. Moral motives strengthen top management commitment, which helps channel stakeholder pressures toward the proactive development of relational capabilities.

Originality/value

The paper fulfills a call for utilizing multiple theoretical lenses to examine complex SSCM phenomena and, ultimately, to create a coherent theory of SSCM.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Yinfei Chen and Injazz J. Chen

As focal buyers implement sustainable supplier management (SSM) to advance their supply chain sustainability, the purpose of this paper is to provide a more nuanced…

Abstract

Purpose

As focal buyers implement sustainable supplier management (SSM) to advance their supply chain sustainability, the purpose of this paper is to provide a more nuanced understanding of how buyers’ use of power may incite varying perceptions of justice from suppliers that affect sustainable supplier performance (SSP).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on multidisciplinary literature and collects empirical data from 181 supplying firms in China to examine the complex links among power use, justice, SSM, and sustainable performance using partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

Both coercive and reward buyer power can facilitate SSM implementation and justice perception moderates the impact of SSM on SSP. Furthermore, coercive power adversely influences justice evaluation, thereby attenuating the effect of SSM on performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study complements and extends sustainable supply chain management research by evaluating SSM: on environmental, social and economic performance; from the perspectives of suppliers; and in an emerging market where many suppliers of Western firms are located. It also adds to behavioral SCM research by examining how buyers’ exercise of power might influence suppliers’ justice perception.

Practical implications

To implement SSM, focal buyers cannot simply issue codes of conduct to suppliers and ignore suppliers’ disposition to commit to standards. While coercive power might be convenient and tempting for buying firms, managers ought to be judicious in the use of coercion.

Originality/value

This is the first large-scale empirical investigation on the links among power use, justice, SSM and sustainable performance from the perspectives of suppliers in an emerging economy.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 49 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2019

Yinfei Chen and Injazz J. Chen

As supply chain sustainability has become more urgent than ever before, this study aims to provide a more nuanced understanding of how supplying firms’ sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

As supply chain sustainability has become more urgent than ever before, this study aims to provide a more nuanced understanding of how supplying firms’ sustainability motives influence their compliance and commitment, as well as sustainable performance, as they respond to buyers’ sustainable supplier management programs.

Design/methodology/approach

To investigate the intriguing links among sustainability motives, compliance/commitment and sustainable performance of supplying firms, this paper draws on multidisciplinary literature and collects empirical data from 281 supplying firms in China to test the proposed model and hypotheses using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Instrumental and moral motives make comparable contributions to compliance; moral motives exert stronger influence on firms’ commitment to sustainable practices. In addition, although compliance has a greater impact on economic and environmental performance, commitment is far more robust in improving environmental and social performance.

Research limitations/implications

Unlike most research on motives that has been theoretical, this study represents one of the few empirical analyses of how motives may affect sustainable performance. Examining the challenges from the perspectives of supplying firms, it also adds to the SSCM literature by making clear how compliance and commitment may differentially predict sustainable performance.

Practical implications

Although instrumental and moral motives can be complementary in advancing sustainable practices, it is imperative for firms to integrate moral considerations into sustainability decision-making and move beyond compliance, if they are to contribute meaningfully to a better society and cleaner environment.

Originality/value

This is the first large-scale empirical investigation on the links among motives, compliance, commitment and sustainable performance from the perspectives of suppliers.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Atul Gupta, Injazz J. Chen and Walter O. Rom

Empirically examines the relative importance of technical andorganizational factors in the implementation of flexible manufacturingsystems (FMS). Identifies a list of…

Abstract

Empirically examines the relative importance of technical and organizational factors in the implementation of flexible manufacturing systems (FMS). Identifies a list of eight technical and organizational factors. Describes a stepwise regression analysis which was performed with the level of perceived success of FMS implementation as the dependent variable. All organizational and technical factors were used as explanatory variables. In the stepwise regression analysis, three of the five organizational factors (i.e. team approach, employee commitment and top management involvement) entered the model, suggesting that they are significant factors to successful FMS implementation. Based on the results of the statistical analysis, three focus groups were further organized to develop a framework for an effective training and management development, to help managers better understand the scope of both the problems and opportunities associated with the human issues which arise while firms are undergoing technological changes.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Augustine A. Lado, Antony Paulraj and Injazz J. Chen

This paper aims to investigate the extent to which a firm's customer focus drives several interlinked facets of supply chain management and their relationships to customer…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the extent to which a firm's customer focus drives several interlinked facets of supply chain management and their relationships to customer service and financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on diverse streams of research, the authors develop and test an integrated model in which customer focus is proposed to foster supply‐chain relational capabilities, leading to beneficial performance outcomes. This study's empirical validity is enhanced by collecting data from over 200 US manufacturing firms and testing the model using SEM.

Findings

This empirical investigation documents significant positive relationships between (a) customer focus and supply‐chain relational capabilities, (b) customer focus and customer service, (c) supply‐chain relational capabilities and customer service, and (d) customer service and financial performance.

Practical implications

This study holds the important implication for managers that, in order to be effective, supply chain partners must reconfigure their supply chains to be more customer oriented and continually develop and leverage the relational competencies in order to enhance firm competitiveness.

Originality/value

Interdisciplinary in nature, this study is one of the first to conduct empirical supply chain management research using multiple and complementary theoretical perspectives, including strategic management and relationship marketing in order to gain a better understanding of the nuances involved in fostering strategic collaboration among supply chain partners.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Injazz J. Chen

The successful implementation of various enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems has provoked considerable interest over the last few years. Management has recently…

Abstract

The successful implementation of various enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems has provoked considerable interest over the last few years. Management has recently been enticed to look toward these new information technologies and philosophies of manufacturing for the key to survival or competitive edges. Although there is no shortage of glowing reports on the success of ERP installations, many companies have tossed millions of dollars in this direction with little to show for it. Since many of the ERP failures today can be attributed to inadequate planning prior to installation, we choose to analyze several critical planning issues including needs assessment and choosing a right ERP system, matching business process with the ERP system, understanding the organizational requirements, and economic and strategic justification. In addition, this study also identifies new windows of opportunity as well as challenges facing companies today as enterprise systems continue to evolve and expand.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Injazz J. Chen and Michael H. Small

While some reports on successes of advanced manufacturing technologies (AMT) have been glowing, many companies have tossed millions of dollars worth of fancy equipment…

Abstract

While some reports on successes of advanced manufacturing technologies (AMT) have been glowing, many companies have tossed millions of dollars worth of fancy equipment into their factories and wound up with little to show for it. It is becoming clear that many of the AMT failures today can be attributed to an inadequate planning process. Proposes a four‐stage research framework that addresses issues in: planning the manufacturing system; planning for an appropriate infrastructure; planning for new relationships with the external environment; and justifying investment in AMT. Assesses the strengths and weaknesses of selected contributions in each stage, and identifies gaps in knowledge where research is needed. The framework devised should help tomorrow’s research build on the past and increase the research’s acceptance by industry, since it draws on both research‐ and practitioner‐based literature along with findings of the field study.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1994

Injazz J. Chen, Atul Gupta and Walter Rom

Studies the relationship between perceived price and perceived qualityfor the three types of services, namely, pure, mixed, andquasi‐manufacturing classified by Chase and…

Abstract

Studies the relationship between perceived price and perceived quality for the three types of services, namely, pure, mixed, and quasi‐manufacturing classified by Chase and Tansik, and the relative importance of five dimensions of service quality identified by Parasuraman et al. Finds that the relationship between perceived price and the five dimensions of service quality appears to be very weak for pure and quasi‐manufacturing services, but is statistically significant for mixed service. Reliability dimension is statistically significant for all three types of service. Tangible dimension is a critical variable for mixed service while the empathy dimension is important for quasi‐manufacturing service. On the other hand, the relationship between perceived price and overall service‐quality is significant for quasi‐manufacturing service, but is weak for pure and mixed services.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Injazz J. Chen and Karen Popovich

Customer relationship management (CRM) is a combination of people, processes and technology that seeks to understand a company's customers. It is an integrated approach to…

Abstract

Customer relationship management (CRM) is a combination of people, processes and technology that seeks to understand a company's customers. It is an integrated approach to managing relationships by focusing on customer retention and relationship development. CRM has evolved from advances in information technology and organizational changes in customer‐centric processes. Companies that successfully implement CRM will reap the rewards in customer loyalty and long run profitability. However, successful implementation is elusive to many companies, mostly because they do not understand that CRM requires company‐wide, cross‐functional, customer‐focused business process re‐engineering. Although a large portion of CRM is technology, viewing CRM as a technology‐only solution is likely to fail. Managing a successful CRM implementation requires an integrated and balanced approach to technology, process, and people.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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