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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Ingrid Bonn and Josie Fisher

This paper explores ways in which different dimensions of sustainability can be addressed at the strategic level within organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores ways in which different dimensions of sustainability can be addressed at the strategic level within organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Building upon previous research, the authors provide a conceptual overview before developing a framework that outlines how sustainability can be addressed during the strategic decision‐making process and as part of the organization's corporate, business and functional level strategies.

Findings

Research has demonstrated that many managers do not understand how to make their organizations more sustainable, even though they recognize the benefits of doing so. The framework developed in this paper suggests a way for managers to integrate sustainability into strategy. It focuses on the strategic decision‐making process, including the cognitive characteristics of strategic decision‐makers and the strategy content at the corporate, business and functional levels. The authors also address the role of organizational culture and vision in supporting sustainable strategies. The framework is illustrated by case examples of BHP Billiton, Loving Earth, the Australian Wine Industry, and Migros.

Practical implications

The framework can be used by managers and scholars to assess the degree to which organizations have strategically addressed sustainability and to identify opportunities for further improvements.

Originality/value

The value of this paper lies in the treatment of sustainability as a strategic, as opposed to an operational, issue. By adopting a strategic approach to sustainability, organizations are more likely to include economic, environmental and social considerations in all aspects of business on an ongoing basis.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

Josie Fisher and Ingrid Bonn

The purpose of this paper is to explore the complexities and tensions that international organisations face in managing ethics.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the complexities and tensions that international organisations face in managing ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

Three levels of ethics are identified and discussed in the paper in the context of three international strategies.

Findings

The study finds that an organisation's approach to ethics depends on its level of ethics and the type of international strategy adopted. These two dimensions have the potential to create identifiable tensions between head office and subsidiaries that will need to be understood and managed.

Practical implications

The paper offers practical guidance to managers by providing a framework for better understanding the tensions and challenges faced by head office and subsidiaries when operating in international markets. Hence, it makes explicit an aspect of strategic management that may not be obvious, but that could influence the organisation's ability to achieve its strategic goals.

Originality/value

This paper extends previous research on ethics and international business by proposing that an organisation's approach to ethics depends on the level of ethics at which it operates and the type of strategy it has adopted.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Ingrid Bonn

Following a multilevel approach, the purpose of this paper is to develop a framework of strategic thinking, which integrates the micro‐domain's focus on individuals and…

Abstract

Purpose

Following a multilevel approach, the purpose of this paper is to develop a framework of strategic thinking, which integrates the micro‐domain's focus on individuals and groups with the macro‐domain's focus on organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first defines strategic thinking, outlines its elements and examines some of the conceptual issues surrounding the construct, especially those concerning levels of analysis. The following questions are addressed. What are the characteristics of an individual strategic thinker? What are the dynamics that take place within groups and how do they influence strategic thinking? What are the contributions of the organisational context to strategic thinking?

Findings

Strategic thinking at the individual level is discussed in terms of diversity in representational systems. Strategic thinking at the group level looks at heterogeneity and conflict. Strategic thinking within the organisational context examines middle management involvement, the role of organisational structure, and reward and compensation systems.

Practical implications

The paper may help senior managers to develop practical interventions for improving strategic thinking in their organisations. This includes the design of appropriate selection, recruitment and development strategies as well as paying attention to group and organisational level factors that create the enabling conditions for the individual characteristics associated with strategic thinking to be utilised.

Originality/value

The paper outlines a theoretical framework of strategic thinking that integrates previous fragmented research from a number of areas and disciplines into a more comprehensive theory of strategic thinking. It represents an important antecedent to strategic decision making and may provide a key to a better understanding of organisational change phenomena and, ultimately, organisational performance and survival.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Ingrid Bonn

Lack of strategic thinking by senior managers has been identified as a major shortcoming in organisations. Draws on concepts in management and psychology to present a…

Abstract

Lack of strategic thinking by senior managers has been identified as a major shortcoming in organisations. Draws on concepts in management and psychology to present a framework that can be used to remedy this situation. Argues that strategic thinking needs to be addressed at two different, but interrelated levels: the individual level and the organisational level. Organisations that successfully integrate strategic thinking at these two levels will create a critical core competency that forms the basis of an enduring competitive advantage.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Ingrid Bonn

Reports the results of an empirical study investigating the key factors that affected the survival of large manufacturing organizations between 1982 and 1993 in Australia…

Abstract

Reports the results of an empirical study investigating the key factors that affected the survival of large manufacturing organizations between 1982 and 1993 in Australia. Four broad categories of variables were examined: environmental variables, organizational variables, company strategies and ownership characteristics. Using logistic regression analysis, it was found that the following variables were significant for company survival: size, planning system, corporate direction, research and development and ownership characteristics.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Terence C. Krell

Serves as an introduction to the special issue on organizational longevity published in the Journal of Organizational Change Management. The issues of researching and…

Abstract

Serves as an introduction to the special issue on organizational longevity published in the Journal of Organizational Change Management. The issues of researching and writing about organizational longevity are described and the content of the special issue is related to a theoretical perspective that focuses on the nature of technological, environmental and cultural change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

Kim Foster, Kate Snowden and John Peters

Abstract

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Ingrid Mulà, Daniella Tilbury, Alexandra Ryan, Marlene Mader, Jana Dlouhá, Clemens Mader, Javier Benayas, Jirí Dlouhý and David Alba

The world is shaped by an education system that reinforces unsustainable thinking and practice. Efforts to transform our societies must thus prioritise the education of…

Abstract

Purpose

The world is shaped by an education system that reinforces unsustainable thinking and practice. Efforts to transform our societies must thus prioritise the education of educators – building their understanding of sustainability and their ability to transform curriculum and wider learning opportunities. The purpose of this paper is to focus on university educators and critically review the professional development and policy landscape challenges that influence their effective engagement with Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). The paper is informed by a pan-European collaboration involving 33 countries that identified emerging scholarship and practice in this area and assessed the lessons learned from ESD professional development initiatives. It sets the context for a special issue titled “Professional Development in Higher Education for Sustainable Development” that draws together a collection of articles focusing on professional development of university educators across the world.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a critical review of existing practice, international policy frameworks and literature relating to ESD, professional development and higher education. It examines innovative initiatives worldwide that seek to improve the capability of educators in higher education to integrate ESD into academic practice at individual, disciplinary and institutional levels. A rigorous process of selection was applied and overseen by an international expert group. This ensured that the initiatives sought educational change in ESD, and not simply the embedding of content about sustainability into learning opportunities. It also assured that the initiatives had a clear and intentional professional learning process to underpin the engagement of participants with ESD.

Findings

ESD has grown in visibility and status worldwide, with a clear increase in activity in higher education. The sector is viewed as a significant force for change in societies, through the education provision it offers to future professionals and leaders in all sectors. However, universities currently lack capacity to integrate ESD effectively into mainstream teaching practices and the training they provide for academic staff or to integrate ESD into their institutional teaching and learning priorities. Many ESD activities remain focused on teaching issues arising in sustainable development research and delivering specialist modules or courses in sustainability. Very few countries and institutions have significant staff development programmes to enhance the ESD competences of university educators and build their academic leadership capabilities for ESD. The contributions to this special issue show the need for greater understanding of the multi-level task of integrating ESD into professional development activities, not just for individual impact in the classroom but to advance institutional change and decisively influence the teaching and learning discourse of higher education.

Originality/value

There are few research studies and documented activities on ESD professional development in higher education available in the literature. This paper attempts to explore what ESD professional development involves and describes its complexity within the higher education sector. The special issue provides a collection of innovative research and practical initiatives that can help those involved in education and learning to develop ESD as a priority for future university innovative pathways.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2018

Andreas Schoeps and Ingrid Hemmer

Since 2012, the University of Eichstaett-Ingolstadt has been publishing an annual report on sustainability as part of its whole institution approach (WIA). This study aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Since 2012, the University of Eichstaett-Ingolstadt has been publishing an annual report on sustainability as part of its whole institution approach (WIA). This study aims to examine the participation in writing this report as it is experienced by the student stakeholders involved. The overall goal is to gain expertise concerning further improvement of students’ participation in sustainability-related aspects as part of WIAs.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on an explorative, qualitative study conducted at the Roman Catholic University of Eichstaett-Ingolstadt. Students who have been involved in writing the university’s report on sustainability were interviewed, using in-depth, semi-structured interviews.

Findings

Various categories relevant for a successful participation have been found. Foremost, there are no general barriers seen which are hindering students from participating in writing the reports. Specific students’ motivation can be gained from work-related experiences and sustainability-related university classes. Students perceived the effects of their work as mostly restricted to the university. Their intellectual contribution was regarded as limited owing to structures given and their student worker status. Positive effects included an increased awareness of sustainability-related activities at the university and increased competences regarding research and writing. Suggestions for improvement comprised the instalment of databanks, special sustainability report-writing classes and motivational measures.

Originality/value

Very few studies have addressed the issue of student participation within the WIAs towards sustainable universities. Students’ involvement in writing university reports on sustainability has so far been neglected. Given this, the study presented provides insight into students’ participation and reveals fields needing further development to ensure successful WIAs.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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