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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Donald G. Norris

Analyses the strategy of ingredient branding and its implicationson the distribution channel members, in addition to its potential foraiding product introduction and…

Abstract

Analyses the strategy of ingredient branding and its implications on the distribution channel members, in addition to its potential for aiding product introduction and adoption. Considers the benefits and the drawbacks for the supplier, manufacturer, retailer and consumer. Concludes that the appropriateness of ingredient branding depends on manufacturer‐supplier relationship, the need to differentiate the brand, and the ability to implement the new branding strategy.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Rajiv Vaidyanathan and Praveen Aggarwal

Current research on brand alliances has focused primarily on alliances between two known, national brands. However, there is significant benefit to both parties in an…

Abstract

Current research on brand alliances has focused primarily on alliances between two known, national brands. However, there is significant benefit to both parties in an alliance between a national brand and a private brand. Such alliances are gaining importance in the industry but have not been studied by marketers. The basic question explored in this study is whether using a national brand ingredient can benefit a private brand without hurting the national brand. First, a theoretical framework to explain how consumers may react to such an alliance is presented. Next, an experiment was conducted which showed that a private brand with a name brand ingredient was evaluated more positively. However, the evaluation of the national brand was not diminished by this association. Implications and future research directions are discussed.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Donald G. Norris

A few suppliers to manufacturers are now working to build brandpreference or consumer franchise. Discusses the success of NutraSweet inobtaining long‐term supply…

Abstract

A few suppliers to manufacturers are now working to build brand preference or consumer franchise. Discusses the success of NutraSweet in obtaining long‐term supply contracts, despite patent expiration; it can be attributed to building such consumer franchise successfully through an ingredient branding strategy that included both their original equipment manufacturers′ customers and the end consumer. To be successful, such a branding effort requires a multifaceted strategy, one which must include collaboration with manufacturers as well as direct consumer promotion. Emphasizes this point with an analysis of the current “Intel Inside” campaign, an ingredient branding strategy being employed by the Intel Corporation, a supplier of microprocessor chips to the personal computer industry. Intel′s efforts represent a particularly demanding test of ingredient branding because both the PC industry and those which supply it are both technology‐driven and extremely price competitive. Despite these obstacles, Intel appears to be making its investment work.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Rafaela Almeida Cordeiro, Mateus Canniatti Ponchio and José Afonso Mazzon

The purpose of this paper is to identify whether consumer evaluations of products are influenced by the presence of co-branding with a well-known reputable ingredient brand

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify whether consumer evaluations of products are influenced by the presence of co-branding with a well-known reputable ingredient brand and whether differences in evaluations are related to the socioeconomic stratum of the consumer.

Design/methodology/approach

These questions were investigated by way of two experiments: the first, using a between-subjects approach that was carried out with 210 subjects and the second, using between- and within-subjects approaches that were carried out with 305 subjects.

Findings

The results show that: products produced by both little-known and well-known brands are evaluated more favourably when they are co-branded with a well-known ingredient brand; there is no evidence that the co-branding effect on product evaluation is stronger for little-known brand products than for well-known brand products; and there is weak evidence that the co-branding effect on product evaluation is stronger among subjects from lower socioeconomic strata than among subjects from the upper stratum.

Research limitations/implications

The theory of anchoring alone is insufficient for explaining differences in product evaluations when the co-branding strategy is adopted. It is believed that positive effects can be also interpreted by the assimilation and signalling theories.

Practical implications

As for the managerial implications, the authors offer insights into the impacts of using a strategic co-branding alliance on the products of little-known brands among consumers from lower and upper strata.

Originality/value

The study contributes to consumer behaviour literature, specifically with regard to ingredient-brand effects in co-branding strategies from the perspective of the end consumer.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Christina Giakoumaki, George J. Avlonitis and George Baltas

The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of ingredient advertising. Specifically, the authors consider the question as to whether ingredient advertising…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of ingredient advertising. Specifically, the authors consider the question as to whether ingredient advertising can increase derived demand and favorably influence purchase intentions and attitudes toward the host product that incorporates the advertised B2B ingredient.

Design/methodology/approach

They conduct experiments in two host product categories using a three-group, between-subjects experimental design.

Findings

The findings of the study are revealing about the impact of ingredient advertising on the demand for host products, in which the advertised ingredients are incorporated. It is demonstrated that consumer advertising positively affects the attitude and purchase intention toward the host brand that incorporates the advertised industrial product. It is also found that the higher the importance of the advertised ingredient as an attribute of the host product, the greater the advertising effects on the consumer brand.

Practical implications

The findings imply that ingredient advertising can help marketers to stimulate derived demand in the sense that it makes consumer brands incorporating the advertised industrial product more attractive to consumers. The positive influence of ingredient advertisements is greater for industrial products that are perceived by consumers as very important ingredients of the final product as consumers are more prone to search for and process ingredient-related information and are also more likely to respond to it.

Originality/value

Despite the implementation of ingredient advertising campaigns by many B2B brands and the vast literature on conventional B2C advertising, there has been no previous attempt to investigate this issue in the empirical literature. This empirical study shows how ingredient advertising works and how it can benefit both buyers and suppliers of the advertised B2B products.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Tuğra Nazlı Akarsu, Pantea Foroudi and T.C. Melewar

While extensive knowledge on branding and communication has focused on business-to-consumer context, despite the nourishment of the importance of strategic alliances…

Abstract

While extensive knowledge on branding and communication has focused on business-to-consumer context, despite the nourishment of the importance of strategic alliances between businesses in terms of co-branding has become discernible, a little attention has been given to business-to-business (B2B) context. This chapter tries to take attention to dual marketing communication, where they are trying to market their products and services to both individuals and businesses. More specifically, this chapter aims to emphasise ingredient branding as a form of co-branding considered as one of the revolutionary dual marketing communication strategies. Notably, the importance of ingredient branding is highlighted for industries and companies who have to design a strategic multi-channel communication plan not just for their customers but also for retaining the competitive advantage, increasing the brand strength for both sides and stimulating the sales. Further, this chapter elaborates the subject with prominent examples of ingredient branding, as well as explains how a communication strategy became an asset for manufacturers and suppliers who are in downturn and lead them to have a growth opportunity with maximising their brand values.

Details

Beyond Multi-channel Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-686-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Joseph Arthur Rooney

Branding is an effective marketing strategy tool that has been usedwith frequent success in the past. Today, branding is experiencing a newpopularity resulting from new…

Abstract

Branding is an effective marketing strategy tool that has been used with frequent success in the past. Today, branding is experiencing a new popularity resulting from new, innovative applications. Although there have been instances where branding has been less than successful, marketers are beginning to find the appropriate applications in a given setting. Issues and problems concerning branding strategy today include the selection of a brand name. This fundamental issue will impact on the success of a branding strategy. Once a name is selected, marketers have to choose the advertising strategy to support and communicate the name. Finally, keeping the brand in a strong position is a critical concern. New areas of branding include corporate, industrial, and service branding. These nontraditional branding environments are becoming the future for marketers using branding strategy. To add to the new branding areas, there are new branding techniques. These techniques include brand extensions and ingredient branding. New strategies, techniques, and arenas for branding have to be managed. The organization must support and identify with the strategy. The goals, objectives, and mission of any organization should be in line with the branding strategy employed.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Abhilash Ponnam, Sreejesh S and M.S. Balaji

Ingredient branding (IB) strategy and incremental product innovation (IPI) strategy are frequently used complementary strategies in food product marketing to build brand

Abstract

Purpose

Ingredient branding (IB) strategy and incremental product innovation (IPI) strategy are frequently used complementary strategies in food product marketing to build brand equity. The purpose of this paper is to assist managers in choosing between both the strategies based upon two governing criteria namely the involvement level of the product category and the level of parent brand equity.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized an experimental design approach. A 2 (product involvement: high vs low)×2 (parent brand equity: high vs low)×2 (attribute strategy: IB vs IPI) balanced, completely randomized factorial design was set up to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Findings suggest that IB strategy should be preferred when the product category is perceived as low involvement or when parent brand equity of the brand is low. The IPI strategy should be preferred when the parent brand equity is high. Either of strategies may be favored in case of high involvement products.

Practical implications

The study provides guidance to product managers in choosing between IB and IPI in devising food product development and marketing strategies.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind which attempts to compare and contrast between tangible and intangible augmentation strategies to build brand equity.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Abdullah M. Aljafari and Tom J. Brown

This paper aims to understand the process of initiating ingredient/component (IC) branding from the supplier's perspective. It proposes modeling entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand the process of initiating ingredient/component (IC) branding from the supplier's perspective. It proposes modeling entrepreneurial orientation (EO) as an antecedent factor and differentiation abilities (functional and reputational) as mediators. Investigating IC branding from the supplier's perspective is critical given the cost and risk associated with implementing such a strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 5,254 manufacturing companies were screened to identify IC supplier firms that meet certain criteria. Survey data were collected from 77 top managers (Chief Executive Officers or Chief Marketing Officers) of IC supplier firms. The paper uses partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) and SPSS in analyzing data.

Findings

The results indicate that IC branding is a complex strategy – one involving a number of steps that need to be taken in a specific order. More specifically, results indicate that IC branding starts with EO exerting a positive influence on IC functional differentiation ability (FDA). FDA facilitates reputational differentiation ability (RDA), which in turn encourages the supplier to initiate IC branding.

Originality/value

This paper addresses an important gap by studying the process through, which suppliers initiate IC branding.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Michael S. McCarthy and Donald G. Norris

Assesses how branded ingredients affect consumer product quality perceptions, confidence in product quality perceptions, product evaluations, taste perceptions, purchase…

Abstract

Assesses how branded ingredients affect consumer product quality perceptions, confidence in product quality perceptions, product evaluations, taste perceptions, purchase likelihoods, and reservation prices of host brands of varying quality. In two experiments, we find that branded ingredients consistently and positively affected moderate‐quality host brands, but only occasionally positively affected higher‐quality host brands. Suggests that managers of both moderate and higher‐quality host brands consider implementing branded ingredient strategies, albeit for different reasons. While moderate‐quality host brands can improve their competitive position by using branded ingredients, higher‐quality host brands generally do not. However, higher‐quality host brands may benefit most by securing the most desirable branded ingredients for their own use, thereby blocking moderate‐quality host brands from using a branded ingredient strategy to improve their competitive position.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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