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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2013

Anita J. Green and Alexandra J. Joy

The purpose of this paper is to provide a description of a small, early-stage feasibility project that used a motivational interviewing (MI) informed intervention on a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a description of a small, early-stage feasibility project that used a motivational interviewing (MI) informed intervention on a psychiatric intensive care unit (PICU).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes a MI informed intervention implemented on a PICU for service users who use cannabis. The intervention was evaluated using a feedback questionnaire post intervention. Due to the small number of service users (n=5) in the first cohort there is limited narrative and quantitative data available.

Findings

The project raised awareness for staff of the potential usefulness of applying MI informed interventions in a PICU setting. All participants stated the intervention should continue to be offered after the project. The intervention needs to be further developed with the possibility of it being used on an acute open ward environment with a larger cohort and consider the use of a randomised-controlled trial approach to validate the results.

Research limitations/implications

The small cohort (n=5) used for this feasibility project and the evaluation limited the opportunity to make general conclusions and recommendations. However, the learning gained can be applied to future applications.

Practical implications

Practitioners can consistently apply the MI informed intervention using templates as a guide when providing drug urine screening results.

Originality/value

The intervention is a novel approach. The authors found no literature on incorporating MI principles and skills with providing drug urine screening results on a PICU; the paper helps to address this dearth of clinical examples.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Chris Bonell, Annik Sorhaindo, Vicki Strange, Meg Wiggins, Elizabeth Allen, Adam Fletcher, Ann Oakley, Lyndal Bond, Brian Flay, George Patton and Tim Rhodes

Evidence from the USA/Australia suggests whole‐school interventions designed to increase social inclusion/engagement can reduce substance use. Completeness of…

Abstract

Purpose

Evidence from the USA/Australia suggests whole‐school interventions designed to increase social inclusion/engagement can reduce substance use. Completeness of implementation varies but contextual determinants have not been fully explored. Informed by previous interventions, the paper aims to examine these topics in an English pilot of the Healthy School Ethos intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

This intervention, like previous interventions, balanced standardization of inputs/process (external facilitator, manual, needs‐survey and staff‐training delivered over one year to enable schools to convene action‐teams) with local flexibility regarding actions to improve social inclusion. Evaluation was via a pilot trial comprising: baseline/follow‐up surveys with year‐7 students in two intervention/comparison schools; semi‐structured interviews with staff, students and facilitators; and observations.

Findings

The intervention was delivered as intended with components implemented as in the USA/Australian studies. The external facilitator enabled schools to convene an action‐team involving staff/students. Inputs were feasible and acceptable and enabled similar actions in both schools. Locally determined actions (e.g. peer‐mediators) were generally more feasible/acceptable than pre‐set actions (e.g. modified pastoral care). Implementation was facilitated where it built on aspects of schools' baseline ethos (e.g. a focus on engaging all students, formalized student participation in decisions) and where senior staff led actions. Student awareness of the intervention was high.

Originality/value

Key factors affecting feasibility were: flexibility to allow local innovation, but structure to ensure consistency; intervention aims resonating with at least some aspects of school baseline ethos; and involvement of staff with the capacity to deliver. The intervention should be refined and its health/educational outcomes evaluated.

Details

Health Education, vol. 110 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2007

Sharon Mavin, Philip Wilding, Brenda Stalker, David Simmonds, Chris Rees and Francine Winch

The purpose of this paper is to report on a Forum for HRD initiative to proactively engage with HRD practitioners to develop “new commons” in the research‐practice nexus…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a Forum for HRD initiative to proactively engage with HRD practitioners to develop “new commons” in the research‐practice nexus. Researchers joined a community of UK university HRD practitioners, negotiated a research project mapping the terrain of HRD practice, explored how research informed these are and identified future practice relevant HRD research.

Design/methodology/approach

The research process is described as grounded in relationship building and collaboration. Researchers utilized qualitative research methods to develop small‐scale empirical research and explore HRD practice in four case study universities and the UK Leadership Foundation for Higher Education.

Findings

Findings are presented in the following themes: organizational approaches to HRD; underpinning philosophies and interventions as research informed and contracting and evaluating external providers and identifies opportunities to develop new commons between theory and practice via collaborative partnerships between the Forum for HRD and UK university HRD practitioners.

Research limitations/implications

Future empirical research which is practice relevant is necessary in the area of evaluation of non‐accredited HRD interventions, the challenges of developing leadership and management in UK HE and the HRD research‐practice nexus.

Practical implications

The paper has valuable implications for bridging the space between HRD research and practice; it surfaces the practitioners' “lack of voice” within the profession and field of HRD and the lack of opportunities for the development of individual HRD practitioners.

Originality/value

The link between practice and theory within universities should be more developed, as HRD academics, a theoretical resource, are also “clients” of a University's HRD approach in practice. The research highlights how the reverse is the case, with the link between theory and practice under developed.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2013

Ronnie Detrich, Timothy A. Slocum and Trina D. Spencer

Special educators make countless decisions regarding services for students with disabilities. The evidence-based practice movement in education encourages those decisions…

Abstract

Special educators make countless decisions regarding services for students with disabilities. The evidence-based practice movement in education encourages those decisions be informed by the best available evidence, professional judgment, and client values and context. In this chapter we argue that while evidence is the best basis for making decisions it is imperfect and uncertainty about the evidence-base for decisions will always exist. We outline three classes of evidence and the sources of uncertainty for each. Finally, we describe a framework for integrating these different sources of evidence as a means for increasing confidence in evidence-based decisions.

Details

Evidence-Based Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-429-9

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Sharon Bird and Melissa Latimer

The purpose of this paper is to examine two types of departmental interventions focused on creating healthier and more equitable academic departments as well as enhancing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine two types of departmental interventions focused on creating healthier and more equitable academic departments as well as enhancing faculty members’ capacity for collective dialogue, goals and work. Both interventions were informed by the “dual-agenda” approach and focused on targeted academic units over a prolonged period.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a variety of qualitative and quantitative data (including National Science Foundation (NSF) ADVANCE indicator data) to assess the potential of dual-agenda informed interventions in reducing gendered structures and gendered dynamics.

Findings

The authors outline essential components of a dual-agenda model for maximizing success in creating more gender equitable work organizations and discuss why the authors are more optimistic about the dual-agenda approaches than many past researchers have been in terms of the potential of the dual-agenda model for promoting more equal opportunities in work organizations.

Originality/value

Most previous dual-agenda projects referenced in the literature have been carried out in non-academic contexts. The projects examined here, however, were administered in the context of multiple academic departments at two medium-sized, public US universities. Although other NSF ADVANCE institutional transformation institutions have included extensive department-focused transformation efforts (e.g. Brown University, Purdue University and Syracuse University), the long-term benefits of these efforts are not yet fully understood; nor have systematic comparisons been made across institutions.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Toby Bartle, Barbara Mullan, Elizaveta Novoradovskaya, Vanessa Allom and Penelope Hasking

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of choice on the development and maintenance of a fruit consumption behaviour and if behaviour change was…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of choice on the development and maintenance of a fruit consumption behaviour and if behaviour change was underpinned by habit strength.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2×2×3 mixed model experimental design was used. The independent variables were pictorial cue and fruit consumption manipulated on two levels: choice and no choice, across three-time points: baseline, post-intervention (after two weeks) and follow-up (one week later). Participants (n=166) completed demographics, the self-report habit index and fruit intake at all three-time points.

Findings

All participants showed significant increases in fruit consumption and habit strength at post-intervention and follow-up. However, participants provided neither choice of cue nor fruit showed a significant decrease in consumption at follow-up.

Practical implications

Fruit consumption can be significantly increased with a relatively simple intervention; choice seems to have an effect on behaviour maintenance, providing no choice negatively effects behaviour maintenance post-intervention. This may inform future interventions designed to increase fruit and vegetable consumption.

Originality/value

The intervention that the authors designed and implemented in the current study is the first of its kind, where choice was manipulated in two different ways and behaviour was changed with a simple environmental cue intervention.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Michael Aherne and José L. Pereira

The purpose of this paper is to use a descriptive case study to establish how collaboration, innovation and knowledge‐management strategies have scaled‐up learning and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use a descriptive case study to establish how collaboration, innovation and knowledge‐management strategies have scaled‐up learning and development in rural, remote and other resource‐constrained Canadian delivery settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Intervention design was realized through a one‐time, collaborative, national capacity‐building project. A project portfolio of 72 sub‐projects, initiatives and strategic activities was used to improve access, enhance quality and create capacity for palliative and end‐of‐life care services. Evaluation was multifaceted, including participatory action research, variance analysis and impact analysis. This has been supplemented by post‐intervention critical reflection and integration of relevant literature.

Findings

The purposeful use of collaboration, innovation and knowledge‐management strategies have been successfully used to support a rapid scaling‐up of learning and development interventions. This has enabled enhanced and new pan‐Canadian health delivery capacity implemented at the local service delivery catchment‐level.

Research limitations/implications

The intervention is bounded by a Canada‐specific socio‐cultural/political context. Design variables and antecedent conditions may not be present and/or readily replicated in other nation‐state contexts. The findings suggest opportunities for future integrative and applied health services and policy research, including collaborative inquiry that weaves together concepts from adult learning, social science and industrial engineering.

Practical implications

Scaling‐up for new capacity is ideally approached as a holistic, multi‐faceted process which considers the total assets within delivery systems, service catchments and communities as potentially being engaged and deployed.

Originality/value

The Pallium Integrated Capacity‐building Initiative offers model elements useful to others seeking theory‐informed practices to rapidly and effectively scale‐up learning and development efforts.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2020

Claudia Stoicescu, Ariel Richer and Louisa Gilbert

Global evidence indicates that multiple structural, biological, and behavioural mechanisms link gender-based violence (GBV), HIV/HCV, and substance misuse among women and…

Abstract

Global evidence indicates that multiple structural, biological, and behavioural mechanisms link gender-based violence (GBV), HIV/HCV, and substance misuse among women and adolescent girls. The aim of this chapter is to briefly summarise and synthesise recent literature that examines the complex and bi-directional relationships among these epidemics in different populations of adolescent girls and women around the world. To inform this chapter, a selective search strategy was conducted, prioritising use of meta-analytic epidemiological studies and research on interventions and policies that address different aspects of the syndemic among women and girls who use drugs worldwide. The search targeted publications from 2015 to 2019 using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar. The chapter highlights methodological and geographic gaps in existing policy, intervention, and implementation research and makes recommendations for strategies to tackle these gaps. It also identifies a continuum of multilevel evidence-based interventions that target the risk environments and key syndemic mechanisms linking these intersecting epidemics that have been found to be effective in reducing intimate partner violence and other forms of GBV, substance use, and HIV/HCV risks. This chapter also assesses inclusiveness of existing research and interventions for underserved and disproportionately affected populations, affecting adolescent girls, sexual minority women, and racial/ethnic minority women and identifies strategies to target gaps or disparities for these key affected populations. Finally, this chapter describes the gaps and opportunities that harm reduction programmes, medical settings, and other community organisations experience in implementing gender-responsive programmes and policies to redress these intersecting epidemics.

Details

The Impact of Global Drug Policy on Women: Shifting the Needle
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-885-0

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2011

Adeyinka M. Akinsulure‐Smith and Wilma L. Jones

This paper aims to discuss the development of a unique, grassroots, community‐based organization, Nah We Yone (NWY), designed specifically to provide support to African…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the development of a unique, grassroots, community‐based organization, Nah We Yone (NWY), designed specifically to provide support to African refugees and asylum seekers, with a history of refugee trauma, war, and human rights abuses, who have fled to the New York City area.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the background to, the challenges faced and the services available at NWY.

Findings

Described in this paper are the rationale for developing this type of organization; specific programs designed to promote well‐being; and various challenges faced and lessons learned, while offering an alternate type of therapeutic intervention.

Practical implications

NWY demonstrates the importance of drawing on cultural and community strengths and resilience when using limited resources to serve traumatized and displaced peoples who are struggling to adjust to a new cultural setting.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to contribute to the literature on culturally informed therapeutic interventions developed by community‐based organizations to enhance well being in forced migrants.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2020

Susan Guthrie and Jois Stansfield

Dysphagia experienced by adults with mental health conditions and/or intellectual disabilities (IDs) has been well-reported. However, accessible and inclusive assessment…

Abstract

Purpose

Dysphagia experienced by adults with mental health conditions and/or intellectual disabilities (IDs) has been well-reported. However, accessible and inclusive assessment measures to identify and monitor for deterioration in dysphagia are very limited. The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of video to enhance inclusion in dysphagia assessment and intervention for an inpatient setting.

Design/methodology/approach

This service evaluation involved adults with IDs and mental illness living in in-patient accommodation and their multidisciplinary team. Participants were invited to film and then reflect on videos and their comments were transcribed for qualitative analysis.

Findings

In total, 42 adults gave consent to film, review and discuss mealtime video-clips. Staff feedback was invited. Thematic analysis was conducted for service-user and staff comments. A global theme of “involvement” was identified from the data analysis, with sub-themes of “enhancing participation, insight and incentive”. An additional global theme “clinical benefits” resulted from staff comments. This included sub-themes of breadth of assessment, shared working and outcome measures.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations included refusal of video by people with heightened anxiety but these were a minority. Most people showed enthusiasm and enhanced engagement. Practical issues were resolved regarding governance.

Practical implications

Video offers a dynamic record of muscle tone, coordination, mealtime experience and individual context benefiting both service-user and staff practice. It stimulates insightful discussion of outcomes and supports the inclusion of service-user perspectives. Further research is indicated to develop a greater understanding of dysphagia in this population. Inclusion of service-users in planning and managing safer mealtimes may be enhanced through the sensitive use of video.

Social implications

This evaluation suggests opportunities for improving inclusive approaches for service-users using video to promote insight.

Originality/value

Further research is indicated to explore the nature of dysphagia in people with mental health conditions using video as a dynamic and unique resource.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

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