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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2020

Hao Chen, Ying Li, Lirong Chen and Jin Yin

While the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) trend provides benefits for employees, it also poses security risks to organizations. This study explores whether and how employees…

Abstract

Purpose

While the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) trend provides benefits for employees, it also poses security risks to organizations. This study explores whether and how employees decide to adopt BYOD practices when they encounter information security–related conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data from 235 employees of Chinese enterprises and applying partial least squares based structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM), we test a series of hypotheses.

Findings

The results suggest that information security–related conflict elicits information security fatigue among employees. As their information security fatigue increases, employees become less likely to adopt BYOD practices. In addition, information security–related conflict has an indirect effect on employee's BYOD adoption through the full mediation of information security fatigue.

Practical implications

This study provides practical implications to adopt BYOD in the workplace through conflict management measures and emotion management strategies. Conflict management measures focused on the reducing of four facets of information security–related conflict, such as improve organization's privacy policies and help employees to build security habits. Emotion management strategies highlighted the solutions to reduce fatigue through easing conflict, such as involving employees in the development or update of information security policies to voice their demands of privacy and other rights.

Originality/value

Our study extends knowledge by focusing on the barriers to employees' BYOD adoption when considering information security in the workplace. Specifically, this study takes a conflict perspective and builds a multi-faceted construct of information security–related conflict. Our study also extends information security behavior research by revealing an emotion-based mediation effect, that of information security fatigue, to explore the mechanism underlying the influence of information security–related conflict on employee behavior.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2019

Ofir Turel, Christian Matt, Manuel Trenz, Christy M.K. Cheung, John D’Arcy*, Hamed Qahri-Saremi* and Monideepa Tarafdar*

Digital technologies have diffused into many personal life domains. This has created many new phenomena that require systematic theorizing, testing and understanding. Such…

Abstract

Purpose

Digital technologies have diffused into many personal life domains. This has created many new phenomena that require systematic theorizing, testing and understanding. Such phenomena have been studied under the Digitization of the Individual (DOTI) umbrella and have been discussed in the DOTI pre-International Conference on Information Systems workshop for the last three years (from 2015 to 2017). While prior years have focused on a variety of issues, this year (2018) we decided to put special emphasis on negative effects of the DOTI, i.e., “the dark side” of the DOTI.

Design/methodology/approach

This manuscript reports on a panel of three experts (in alphabetical order: John D’Arcy, Hamed Qahri-Saremi and Monideepa Tarafdar) who presented their past research in this domain, as well as their outlook for future research and methodologies in research on the DOTI.

Findings

The authors introduce the topic, chronicle the responses of the panelists to the questions the authors posed, and summarize and discuss their response, such that readers can develop a good idea regarding next steps in research on the dark side of the DOTI.

Originality/value

The authors introduce the topic of the dark sides of DOTI and point readers to promising research directions and methodologies for further exploring this relatively uncharted field of research.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2020

Jie Tang, Umair Akram and Wenjing Shi

Mobile Applications (App) privacy has become a prominent social problem. Compared with privacy concerns, this study examines a relatively novel concept of privacy fatigue

Abstract

Purpose

Mobile Applications (App) privacy has become a prominent social problem. Compared with privacy concerns, this study examines a relatively novel concept of privacy fatigue and explores its effect on the users’ intention to disclose their personal information via mobile Apps. In addition, the personality traits are proposed as antecedents that will induce the personal perception of privacy fatigue and privacy concerns differently.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 426 respondents. Structure equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings describe that App users’ intention toward personal information disclosure is determined by privacy fatigue and privacy concerns, but the former has a greater impact. With minor exceptions, the two factors are also influenced by different personality traits. Specifically, neuroticism has positive effects on privacy fatigue, but agreeableness and extraversion have presented the opposite results on the two variables.

Practical implications

This research is very scarce to examine the joint effects of privacy fatigue, privacy concerns and personality traits on App users’ disclosing intention. In doing so, these results will be of benefit to App providers and platform managers and can be the basis for a variety of follow-up studies.

Originality/value

While previous research just focuses on privacy concerns, this study explores the critical roles of privacy fatigue and opens up a new avenue of emotion-attitude analysis that can further increase the specificity and richness of users’ privacy research. Additionally, implications for personality traits as antecedents in the impact of App users’ privacy emotions and attitudes are discussed.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Wayne D. Kearney and Hennie A. Kruger

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and theorise on the appropriateness and potential impact of risk homeostasis in the context of information security.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and theorise on the appropriateness and potential impact of risk homeostasis in the context of information security.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion is mainly based on a literature survey backed up by illustrative empirical examples.

Findings

Risk homeostasis in the context of information security is an under-explored topic. The principles, assumptions and methodology of a risk homeostasis framework offer new insights and knowledge to explain and predict contradictory human behaviour in information security.

Practical implications

The paper shows that explanations for contradictory human behaviour (e.g. the privacy paradox) would gain from considering risk homeostasis as an information security risk management model. The ideas discussed open up the prospect to theorise on risk homeostasis as a framework in information security and should form a basis for further research and practical implementations. On a more practical level, it offers decision makers useful information and new insights that could be advantageous in a strategic security planning process.

Originality/value

This is the first systematic comprehensive review of risk homeostasis in the context of information security behaviour and readers of the paper will find new theories, guidelines and insights on risk homeostasis.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Dirk Snyman and Hennie Kruger

The purpose of this study is to perform an exploratory investigation into the feasibility of behavioural threshold analysis as a possible aid in security awareness campaigns.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to perform an exploratory investigation into the feasibility of behavioural threshold analysis as a possible aid in security awareness campaigns.

Design/methodology/approach

Generic behavioural threshold analysis is presented and then applied in the domain of information security by collecting data on the behavioural thresholds of individuals in a group setting and how the individuals influence each other when it comes to security behaviour.

Findings

Initial experimental results show that behavioural threshold analysis is feasible in the context of information security and may provide useful guidelines on how to construct information security awareness programmes.

Practical implications

Threshold analysis may contribute in a number of ways to information security, e.g. identification of security issues that are susceptible to peer pressure and easily influenced by peer behaviour; serve as a countermeasure against security fatigue; contribute to the economics of information security awareness programmes; track progress of security awareness campaigns; and provide a new measure for determining the importance of security awareness issues.

Originality/value

This paper describes the very first experiment to test the behavioural threshold analysis concepts in the context of information security.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Sven Laumer and Christian Maier

Social media usage, especially social networking sites (SNSs), such as Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, Twitter, WhatsApp, YouTube, and LinkedIn provide lots of benefits to…

Abstract

Social media usage, especially social networking sites (SNSs), such as Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, Twitter, WhatsApp, YouTube, and LinkedIn provide lots of benefits to their users, including fun, information from significant others, and a distraction from real-life problems. In parallel, the authors see that there are also negative consequences, such as stress when using SNS. In 2012, research started to talk about SNS-use stress as a specific form of technostress. Since that early study, 62 articles have been published in peer-reviewed outlets that explain why SNS-users perceive stress. Our literature review uses the transactional model of stress to integrate these articles to propose a transactional model of SNS-use stress. The model indicates social and technical SNS-stressors that trigger psychological, physiological, and behavioural reactions, named SNS-strains. Our findings suggest there are more social SNS-stressors than technical ones. In terms of SNS-strain, research has mainly focussed on psychological, e.g. exhaustion or dissatisfaction, and behavioural, e.g. discontinuous usage intention or distraction, SNS-strains. Based on those results, the authors identify research gaps and provide implications for research, SNS-users, SNS-providers, organisations, and parents. With that, the authors aim to provide a conceptual summary of the past and, simultaneously, a starting point for further research.

Details

Information Technology in Organisations and Societies: Multidisciplinary Perspectives from AI to Technostress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-812-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

T. Derek Halling and Douglas C. Hahn

The purpose of this paper is to transform a user‐authentication process for a document delivery and borrowing service into a simplified and unified logon access method…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to transform a user‐authentication process for a document delivery and borrowing service into a simplified and unified logon access method consistent with other library services by leveraging a University Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP).

Design/methodology/approach

Data fields were analyzed from the Texas A&M University Libraries' interlibrary loan and document delivery application (ILLiad) to determine the unique information that was critical to maintain account security and historical usage. As an added feature, plans were made and implemented to provide account authentication with another system entity through the use of Shibboleth software.

Findings

The campus LDAP proved a popular added feature. Since the implementation of the new authentication and authorization methods, usage of the service has increased even though the number of actual live accounts has decreased. Account security and user affiliation statistics were greatly improved.

Practical implications

More efficient authentication and authorization processes increased the effectiveness of the document delivery service. Use of the LDAP protocol and Shibboleth software enhanced the authentication process for both the library and the user. Eliminating the need for a separate set of credentials for use of the document delivery service reduced the potential for password fatigue.

Originality/value

The creation and implementation of different technologies to further refine migration and systematic processes. A guide to the steps taken to facilitate moving from one authentication method to a more advanced system leveraging Shibboleth and .ASP for quality assurance.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 March 2020

Aqdas Malik, Amandeep Dhir, Puneet Kaur and Aditya Johri

The current study aims to investigate if different measures related to online psychosocial well-being and online behavior correlate with social media fatigue.

Abstract

Purpose

The current study aims to investigate if different measures related to online psychosocial well-being and online behavior correlate with social media fatigue.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand the antecedents and consequences of social media fatigue, the stressor-strain-outcome (SSO) framework is applied. The study consists of two cross-sectional surveys that were organized with young-adult students. Study A was conducted with 1,398 WhatsApp users (aged 19 to 27 years), while Study B was organized with 472 WhatsApp users (aged 18 to 23 years).

Findings

Intensity of social media use was the strongest predictor of social media fatigue. Online social comparison and self-disclosure were also significant predictors of social media fatigue. The findings also suggest that social media fatigue further contributes to a decrease in academic performance.

Originality/value

This study builds upon the limited yet growing body of literature on a theme highly relevant for scholars, practitioners as well as social media users. The current study focuses on examining different causes of social media fatigue induced through the use of a highly popular mobile instant messaging app, WhatsApp. The SSO framework is applied to explore and establish empirical links between stressors and social media fatigue.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2020

Yanfeng Zhang, Yali Liu, Wenzhuo Li, Lihui Peng and Cong Yuan

This paper aims to discuss major influencing factors causing users’ mobile social media fatigue and divides them into three hierarchies, including causal factors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss major influencing factors causing users’ mobile social media fatigue and divides them into three hierarchies, including causal factors, intermediary factors and outcome factors. The study also sorts out connections between different levels of factors, thus providing effective guidance for the sustained development of social media.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the grounded theory and by collecting data through in-depth interviews, the authors use open coding, axial coding and selective coding to analyze major influencing factors of users’ mobile social media fatigue, build a model using the software NVivo 11, organize and analyze mobile social media fatigue behavior and identify the relationships by combining the interpretive structural model and explore connections among the factors.

Findings

The influencing factors of mobile social media fatigue behavior conform with the stressors-strains-outcomes (SSO) theoretical framework, where stressors (S) include the five factors of fear of missing out, perceived overload, compulsive use, time cost and privacy concerns; strains (S) include the five factors of a low sense of achievement, emotional anxiety, reduced interest, social concerns and emotional exhaustion; outcomes (O) include the six factors of neglect behavior, diving behavior, avoidance behavior, tolerance behavior, withdrawal behavior and substitution behavior.

Research limitations/implications

It focuses on the discussion of the interactions between users’ stressors, strains and outcomes without fully considering the impact of social environment and educational background on social media fatigue behavior. This study only focuses on one social media platform in the Chinese context, namely, WeChat. We reply on the qualitative research method to construct the relationships between social media fatigue factors because we were mainly interested in how users would respond psychologically and emotionally to social media fatigue behavior.

Practical implications

The study has extended the application of the SSO theory. Additionally, the research method and model used in this paper may serve as guidelines to other interested scholars who intend to explore relevant variables and conduct further research on the influencing factors of social media fatigue. In analyzing the causality of social media fatigue, the study has integrated the intermediary factor strain to display users’ strains from social media stress with a more detailed path discussion on the causality of social media fatigue, which has not received broad attention in previous research literature on social networking services users’ use.

Social implications

In this study, text data are collected in a diversity of forms combined, allowing respondents to answer questions without being limited by the questions in the questionnaire, which helped us to identify new variables of social media fatigue. As a result, we were able to dig out the fundamental causes of social media fatigue and potential connections between the factors. Relevant scholars, users and businesses may analyze, manage and forecast users’ social media fatigue behavior by analyzing the type of social media stress and users’ state, providing guidance for the proposal of corresponding management strategies.

Originality/value

Most relevant studies focus on the sustained use of social media, and there is a scarcity of studies on social media fatigue in China. There is very limited research that conducts model analysis of social media fatigue through the integration of stressors, strains and outcomes.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Bryan Vila

Conducts a pilot study on excessive fatigue in patrol officers of high crime rate areas, using data collected by 53 telephone esquires. Compares police overtime to that…

Abstract

Conducts a pilot study on excessive fatigue in patrol officers of high crime rate areas, using data collected by 53 telephone esquires. Compares police overtime to that considered acceptable in other professions where public safety is implicated and finds that police receive unfavorable treatment. Considers the vulnerability of police to the effects of fatigue and the potential costs of fatigue on cognitive performance, misconduct, health and safety. Remarks that police are culturally constrained to accept fatigue; that managers depend on overtime to cope with fluctuating demands and to operate within economic limits; that police are obliged to spend lengthy hours in court; that officers can become dependent on overtime pay. Suggests inter alia that community policing will help in avoiding “exhausted crusaders”. Advocates use of self‐regulation, peer monitoring and health care, use of improved technology, modifying work schedules, limiting exposure to high crime and considering reforms to civil liability.

Details

American Journal of Police, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0735-8547

Keywords

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