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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2020

Hao Chen, Ying Li, Lirong Chen and Jin Yin

While the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) trend provides benefits for employees, it also poses security risks to organizations. This study explores whether and how employees…

Abstract

Purpose

While the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) trend provides benefits for employees, it also poses security risks to organizations. This study explores whether and how employees decide to adopt BYOD practices when they encounter information securityrelated conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data from 235 employees of Chinese enterprises and applying partial least squares based structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM), we test a series of hypotheses.

Findings

The results suggest that information securityrelated conflict elicits information security fatigue among employees. As their information security fatigue increases, employees become less likely to adopt BYOD practices. In addition, information securityrelated conflict has an indirect effect on employee's BYOD adoption through the full mediation of information security fatigue.

Practical implications

This study provides practical implications to adopt BYOD in the workplace through conflict management measures and emotion management strategies. Conflict management measures focused on the reducing of four facets of information securityrelated conflict, such as improve organization's privacy policies and help employees to build security habits. Emotion management strategies highlighted the solutions to reduce fatigue through easing conflict, such as involving employees in the development or update of information security policies to voice their demands of privacy and other rights.

Originality/value

Our study extends knowledge by focusing on the barriers to employees' BYOD adoption when considering information security in the workplace. Specifically, this study takes a conflict perspective and builds a multi-faceted construct of information securityrelated conflict. Our study also extends information security behavior research by revealing an emotion-based mediation effect, that of information security fatigue, to explore the mechanism underlying the influence of information securityrelated conflict on employee behavior.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Martin Karlsson, Thomas Denk and Joachim Åström

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the occurrence of value conflicts between information security and other organizational values among white-collar workers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the occurrence of value conflicts between information security and other organizational values among white-collar workers. Further, analyzes are conducted of the relationship between white-collar workers’ perceptions of the culture of their organizations and value conflicts involving information security.

Design/methodology/approach

Descriptive analyses and regression analyses were conducted on survey data gathered among two samples of white-collar workers in Sweden.

Findings

Value conflicts regarding information security occur regularly among white-collar workers in the private and public sectors and within different business sectors. Variations in their occurrence can be understood partly as a function of employees’ work situations and the sensitivity of the information handled in the organization. Regarding how perceived organizational culture affects the occurrence of value conflicts, multivariate regression analysis reveals that employees who perceive their organizations as having externally oriented, flexible cultures experience value conflicts more often.

Research limitations/implications

The relatively low share of explained variance in the explanatory models indicates the need to identify alternative explanations of the occurrence of value conflicts regarding information security.

Practical implications

Information security managers need to recognize that value conflicts occur regularly among white-collar workers in different business sectors, more often among workers in organizations that handle sensitive information, and most often among white-collar workers who perceive the cultures of their organizations as being externally oriented and flexible.

Originality/value

The study addresses a gap in the information security literature by contributing to the understanding of value conflicts between information security and other organizational values. This study has mapped the occurrence of value conflicts regarding information security among white-collar professionals and shows that the occurrence of value conflicts is associated with work situation, information sensitivity and perceived organizational culture.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Frank Fitzpatrick

Abstract

Details

Understanding Intercultural Interaction: An Analysis of Key Concepts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-397-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Joakim Berndtsson, Peter Johansson and Martin Karlsson

The purpose of the study is to explore potential value conflicts between information security work and whistleblowing activities by analysing attitudes to whistleblowing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to explore potential value conflicts between information security work and whistleblowing activities by analysing attitudes to whistleblowing among white-collar workers in Swedish organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is conducted using survey data among (n = 674) Swedish white-collar workers. Statistical analyses are conducted to explore variations in acceptance of whistleblowing and analyse the relationship between acceptance for whistleblowing and information security attitudes and behaviours.

Findings

The study finds strong support for whistleblowing in both public and private spheres, and by both private and public sector employees. The study also finds stronger acceptance for intra-organisational whistleblowing, while support for external whistleblowing is low. Finally, the study shows that the whistleblowing activities might be perceived as coming in conflict with information security work, even as the support for including whistleblowing functions in information security practices is high.

Research limitations/implications

With a focus on one country, the study is limited in terms of empirical scope. It is also limited by a relatively small number of respondents and survey items relating to whistleblowing, which in turn affects its explanatory value. However, the study does provide unique new insight into a specific form of “non-compliance”, i.e. whistleblowing, which merits further investigation.

Originality/value

Few studies exist that combine insights from the fields of whistleblowing and information security research. Thus, this study provides a basis for further investigation into attitudes and behaviours linked to whistleblowing in public and private organisations, as well as attendant value conflicts related to information security management and practice.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

James L. Price

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool…

Abstract

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool, seeks to improve measurement in the study of work organizations and to facilitate the teaching of introductory courses in this subject. Focuses solely on work organizations, that is, social systems in which members work for money. Defines measurement and distinguishes four levels: nominal, ordinal, interval and ratio. Selects specific measures on the basis of quality, diversity, simplicity and availability and evaluates each measure for its validity and reliability. Employs a set of 38 concepts ‐ ranging from “absenteeism” to “turnover” as the handbook’s frame of reference. Concludes by reviewing organizational measurement over the past 30 years and recommending future measurement reseach.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 18 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Fredrik Karlsson, Martin Karlsson and Joachim Åström

This paper aims to investigate two different types of compliance measures: the first measure is a value-monistic compliance measure, whereas the second is a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate two different types of compliance measures: the first measure is a value-monistic compliance measure, whereas the second is a value-pluralistic measure, which introduces the idea of competing organisational imperatives.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was developed using two sets of items to measure compliance. The survey was sent to 600 white-collar workers and analysed through ordinary least squares.

Findings

The results suggest that when using the value-monistic measure, employees’ compliance was a function of employees’ intentions to comply, their self-efficacy and awareness of information security policies. In addition, compliance was not related to the occurrence of conflicts between information security and other organisational imperatives. However, when the dependent variable was changed to a value-pluralistic measure, the results suggest that employees’ compliance was, to a great extent, a function of the occurrence of conflicts between information security and other organisational imperatives, indirect conflicts with other organisational values.

Research limitations/implications

The results are based on small survey; yet, the findings are interesting and justify further investigation. The results suggest that relevant organisational imperatives and value systems, along with information security values, should be included in measures for employees’ compliance with information security policies.

Practical implications

Practitioners and researchers should be aware that there is a difference in measuring employees’ compliance using value monistic and value pluralism measurements.

Originality/value

Few studies exist that critically compare the two different compliance measures for the same population.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Mary Weir and Jim Hughes

Introduction Consider a hi‐fi loudspeaker manufacturing company acquired on the brink of insolvency by an American multinational. The new owners discover with growing…

Abstract

Introduction Consider a hi‐fi loudspeaker manufacturing company acquired on the brink of insolvency by an American multinational. The new owners discover with growing concern that the product range is obsolete, that manufacturing facilities are totally inadequate and that there is a complete absence of any real management substance or structure. They decide on the need to relocate urgently so as to provide continuity of supply at the very high — a market about to shrink at a rate unprecedented in its history.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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