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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Neil Dias Karunaratne

This article presents a set of techniques to measure and analyse the structure of the information economy of a country using input‐output methods. Published national data…

Abstract

This article presents a set of techniques to measure and analyse the structure of the information economy of a country using input‐output methods. Published national data bases for many countries fail to identify the information economy and the focus has been on the measurement of conventional sectors such as agriculture, manufacturing and services. However, it is now widely recognised that the information sector is emerging as a major force in the restructuring and growth of many economies in the world. The measurement and analysis of this information economy is invaluable for proper policy formulation in this information age. The article demonstrates the operational nature of the techniques proposed herein, by their application to Australia and a few developing economies in the Pacific.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Maria Krambia-Kapardis, Colin Clark and Anastasios Zopiatis

Public information disclosure is a manifestation of transparency and contributes to governance-by-disclosure. Also, better financial reporting can improve the credibility…

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Abstract

Purpose

Public information disclosure is a manifestation of transparency and contributes to governance-by-disclosure. Also, better financial reporting can improve the credibility and integrity of public finances and contribute to a better management of public resources. A survey was carried out in Cyprus of users’ of public financial reports concerning an expectation gap about the types of information included in such reports (information needs expectation gap) as well as the quality of such information (information quality satisfaction gap). The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Two focus groups of users and preparers of public financial reports were used to construct the questionnaire. Users of such reports, who belonged to all three categories of public sector financial reporting identified by IPSASB, were surveyed. The quantitative data obtained was analysed using SPSS and quadrant analysis to answer the research questions posed.

Findings

Data from 101 respondents confirmed that each of the information needs identified in the IPSASB Consultation Paper (2008) was rated as being a significant information need. Data analysis also showed that both types of expectation gap exist, especially as far as local authority and semi-public organisations are concerned.

Research limitations/implications

The response rate in the self-administered survey was admittedly rather low but it was not unexpected mainly due to the survey’s very specialised nature and the tendency by people in Cyprus not to critique public bodies.

Practical implications

Deficient financial public sector reporting means the auditor general is not able to adequately express an opinion on public spending at the local government level. This, in turn, means taxpayers do not get the quality of services they pay for. At the same time, the lack of information transparency means corrupt practices are not eradicated. One answer to the problem would be legislating the content of public financial reports.

Social implications

The lack of governance-by-public exposure means that services to the local community cost a lot more, due to corruption and inefficiency. In addition, it contributes to lowering market confidence and eventually contributes to financial crisis at the national level.

Originality/value

The survey conducted was the first of its kind in Cyprus to investigate financial public sector reporting and document both manifestations of the expectation gap. In addition, information needs identified in the IPSASB Consultation Paper (2008) was rated as significantly needed and this is the first time it has been done in Eurozone member state and in a country facing a financial crisis.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Neil Jacobs

Many and varied information sources are used by researchers and managers across sectors relevant to public policy development. When aggregated, these sources can be…

Abstract

Many and varied information sources are used by researchers and managers across sectors relevant to public policy development. When aggregated, these sources can be described in terms of sector‐specific information landscapes. This paper describes results from a survey that investigated such landscapes and relates them to the working practices of those for whom they were relevant. This is achieved through the use of co‐word or co‐term analysis, a technique derived from actor‐network theory. This technique allows for the production of graphic plots of normalised free text term pairs, which take into account inclusiveness. The results suggest that knowledge communities can be identified by this technique.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 58 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Antonio Muñoz-Cañavate and Pedro Hípola

The purpose of this paper is to first, describe the origins and evolution of electronic information products and services for the business community in Spain and second…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to first, describe the origins and evolution of electronic information products and services for the business community in Spain and second, to analyze the current distribution of today’s market players.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on a review of the scholarly literature about the information industry, on Spanish annuals and directories about databases, on related legislation, and on the broad experience of the authors who have worked in this field since the 1980s.

Findings

The early days of the business information industry in Spain developed precariously, in comparison to other parts of the world. Furthermore, the supply of information was almost entirely monopolized by the public administration. Nevertheless, the structure and market players have been completely reorganized, starting in the 1980s, leading to today’s totally transformed panorama.

Originality/value

Three main factors can explain this evolution: first, growth in the creation of new companies; second, processes of mergers and acquisitions; third, recent consolidation of a group of companies that re-use information generated by the public sector. Their activities have been stimulated by legislative initiatives over the past eight years that promote and regulate this market.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Ni Putu S., G. Jan van Helden and Sandra Tillema

This paper aims to explore the influence of specific characteristics of the public sector in developing countries (i.e. a low‐institutional capacity, a limited involvement…

3817

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the influence of specific characteristics of the public sector in developing countries (i.e. a low‐institutional capacity, a limited involvement of stakeholders, and high levels of corruption and informality), and of reforms of this sector, on public sector performance measurement (PSPM).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a review of prior literature, the paper develops understanding of the demand for and supply of performance information in developing countries, and of changes in this area.

Findings

The paper argues that public sector organisations in developing countries are likely to face an unbalanced position, i.e. disequilibrium between the demand for and supply of performance information. More precisely, the public sector reforms – which are partly stimulated by a growing involvement of some stakeholders – lead to an increasing demand for performance information but, because of the low‐institutional capacity and the high level of corruption, this increasing demand is not always followed by a sufficient supply of performance information. This leads to an “unsatisfied demand” position.

Research limitations/implications

The paper concludes with an overview of issues related to PSPM in a developing country context that require further investigation.

Practical implications

The arguments presented in this paper are summarised in an overview of factors that influence the demand for and supply of performance information in the public sector in developing countries. This overview might be helpful to those who are involved in the design of performance measurement systems in these countries.

Originality/value

So far, relatively little is known about PSPM in a developing country context. This paper is an attempt to fill this gap.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business…

Abstract

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business activities in which the firms are engaged are outlined to provide background information for the reader.

Details

Reputation Building, Website Disclosure and the Case of Intellectual Capital
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-506-9

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Khaled Hussainey and Ali Al-Nodel

Purpose – This paper examines the extent to which Saudi listed companies report online information about their corporate governance practice in light of the guidance…

Abstract

Purpose – This paper examines the extent to which Saudi listed companies report online information about their corporate governance practice in light of the guidance issued by the Saudi Arabian Capital Market Authority (SACMA), thereafter.

Methodology – We adopted a content analysis approach, accordingly a corporate governance disclosure index is developed to analyse the content of every company's website.

Findings – We found that the majority of Saudi listed companies utilise the Internet to communicate some information about corporate governance to their stakeholders. We also found that the level of online reporting of corporate governance varies between sectors. In particular, the paper revealed that the banking sector has the highest level of corporate governance disclosure compared with other sectors. On the other side, companies in the industry and service sectors provide very little information about corporate governance on their websites. The results suggest that the nature of control over the sector, the involvement of government in the ownership and management of businesses and some social assumptions could have an impact on companies’ decision to disclose online information about their corporate governance in developing countries.

Practical implications – The importance of investigating online reporting of corporate governance in Saudi Arabia emerges from the fact that SACMA published a guidance in 2006 that recommends the disclosure of corporate governance information by Saudi listed companies. Therefore, it would be worthwhile informing SACMA about the extent of compliance with the guidance of corporate governance. This is essential taking into consideration two facts: first, the recent remarkable growth of the Saudi stock market which was accompanied by significant increase in the demand for additional information by stakeholders; second, the recent increase of the utilisation of the Internet by companies for disclosure purposes worldwide. Further, the results of this research study could add to our limited knowledge about the practice of corporate governance in developing countries.

Originality/value – This paper contributes to the limited literature on disclosure practices in developing countries in general and in Saudi Arabia in particular. Our review of the literature revealed that there is no study to date on online disclosure of corporate governance in Saudi Arabia and very limited research has been carried out in developing countries in general. This is important taking into consideration environmental factors of developing countries, which could bring different sight in the issue of the disclosure of corporate governance.

Details

Corporate Governance in Less Developed and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-252-4

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Sarishma Sharma and Khushdeep Dharni

The purpose of this paper is to study the status and trend of intellectual capital disclosures by selected companies in India. Three categories of intellectual capital…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the status and trend of intellectual capital disclosures by selected companies in India. Three categories of intellectual capital disclosures across six industry groups were measured. The relation of the three categories of disclosures, i.e. human capital, relational capital and structural capital disclosures with the measures of organisational performance such as sales, R&D, R&D intensity, net profit and export intensity has also been studied.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on National Industrial Classification 2008, six sectors, namely pharmaceutical, basic metals, industrial manufacturing, energy, financial services and information technology were included in the study and 20 companies were selected from each sector based on the availability of data from 2004-2005 to 2013-2014, thus, making a sample of 1,200 firm-years. For collecting the data, a list of keywords related to various dimensions of intellectual capital was prepared and the count of keywords was searched in the annual reports of the companies.

Findings

Significant and positive trend coefficients were found in the majority of the sectors. Analysis revealed that trend coefficients differed across various sectors indicating the presence of sector specificity. Results of trend analysis reveal that structural capital-related disclosures have stagnated in case of pharmaceutical sector after hitting the peak. Significant variations were found across sectors in terms of all three types of intellectual capital disclosures. Results of study empirically support the fact that intellectual capital disclosures tend to increase with size of the organisation.

Research limitations/implications

As data have been collected from annual reports of the companies, the accuracy of the findings is limited to the accuracy of the reported data.

Originality/value

The study is an original piece of work. This study provides an insight into the disclosure trend of intellectual capital in an emerging economy.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Katleen Janssen

This paper aims to address the recent trends and developments relating to the re‐use of public sector information (PSI) and open government data.

639

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the recent trends and developments relating to the re‐use of public sector information (PSI) and open government data.

Design/methodology/approach

It starts from the European Commission's Digital Agenda, which stressed the importance of opening up access to content to promote the single market. While the 2003 PSI directive has contributed to this, barriers to the re‐use of PSI still remain, often based on a lack of awareness with public sector data holders and users. Some of these barriers are currently being challenged by the open government data (OGD) movement. While this movement has comparable objectives to the PSI directive, it is based on different arguments. This raises the question of how the two approaches relate.

Findings

The paper argues that the proponents of the re‐use of PSI and OGD should join forces to promote the availability of public sector data.

Originality/value

In this way, the public sector can be encouraged to rethink its information policy and move to a more coherent view on how data can be used to increase the benefits for the information society and the market for digital content.

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Benson Igboke and Razaq Raj

Accounting literature is definite about the content and presentation of traditional financial statements, but the basic information to be provided in the narrative reports…

Abstract

Purpose

Accounting literature is definite about the content and presentation of traditional financial statements, but the basic information to be provided in the narrative reports of public sector entities remains unsettled. This paper aims to investigate the needs and expectations of stakeholders (primary users and preparers) regarding the content and presentation of narrative reports in the public sector of Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used a qualitative approach that draws on stakeholder and contingency theories to collect primary data through in-depth individual interviews using semi-structured questionnaires. Data were analysed by a thematic method using the NVivo 11 Pro software package.

Findings

The study reveals that financial statements constitute the statutory financial reports of public sector entities in Nigeria as narrative reporting is undeveloped, both as a concept and in practice. Stakeholders believe that narrative reporting is required to enhance the accountability usefulness of the annual financial reports published by the government and public agencies. Data analysis further reveals that public perception about the management of government financial resources influences the information needs of stakeholders regarding financial reporting. In addition, stakeholders consider the approved budget as the cornerstone of public financial reporting. Accordingly, users and other stakeholders expect public sector narrative reports to provide budget-based performance information that relates the accounting data presented in the financial statements to the key budgetary provisions, in both financial outlays and service delivery achievements. Stakeholders also expect narrative reports to be presented in plain language and provide information about the impact of financial decisions and actions on the basic socioeconomic variables that signpost citizens’ well-being, such as education, health care, employment and security.

Practical implications

The study suggests that the inclusion of narrative information in the statutory financial reports of public entities in Nigeria is imperative and should engage the attention of policymakers and relevant regulatory authorities. In addition, a more elaborate systematic investigation of the information needs of stakeholders in Nigeria should be undertaken by relevant units of government.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first documented research on narrative reporting and the information needs of a broad range of stakeholders in the public sector of Nigeria. The paper identifies the approved budget as the focal point of governmental financial reporting, and a clear linkage between budget provisions, accounting results and service delivery achievements as the basic content of a narrative report in developing countries.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

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