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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

James L. Price

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool…

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11574

Abstract

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool, seeks to improve measurement in the study of work organizations and to facilitate the teaching of introductory courses in this subject. Focuses solely on work organizations, that is, social systems in which members work for money. Defines measurement and distinguishes four levels: nominal, ordinal, interval and ratio. Selects specific measures on the basis of quality, diversity, simplicity and availability and evaluates each measure for its validity and reliability. Employs a set of 38 concepts ‐ ranging from “absenteeism” to “turnover” as the handbook’s frame of reference. Concludes by reviewing organizational measurement over the past 30 years and recommending future measurement reseach.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 18 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Ahmed H. Al-Dmour, Masam Abood and Hani H. Al-Dmour

This study aims at investigating the extent of SysTrust’s framework (principles and criteria) as an internal control approach for assuring the reliability of accounting…

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2321

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at investigating the extent of SysTrust’s framework (principles and criteria) as an internal control approach for assuring the reliability of accounting information system (AIS) were being implemented in Jordanian business organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on primary data collected through a structured questionnaire from 239 out of 328 shareholdings companies. The survey units were the shareholding companies in Jordan, and the single key respondents approach was adopted. The extents of SysTrust principles were also measured. Previously validated instruments were used where required. The data were analysed using t-test and ANOVA.

Findings

The results indicated that the extent of SysTrust being implemented could be considered to be moderate at this stage. This implies that there are some variations among business organizations in terms of their level of implementing of SysTrust principles and criteria. The results also showed that the extent of SysTrust principles being implemented was varied among business organizations based on their business sector. However, there were not found varied due to their size of business and a length of time in business (experience).

Research limitations/implications

This study is only conducted in Jordan as a developing country. Although Jordan is a valid indicator of prevalent factors in the wider MENA region and developing countries, the lack of external validity of this research means that any generalization of the research findings should be made with caution. Future research can be orientated to other national and cultural settings and compared with the results of this study.

Practical implications

The study provides evidence of the need for management to recognize the importance of the implementation of SysTrust principles and criteria as an internal control for assuring the reliability of AIS within their organizations and be aware which of these principles are appropriate to their size and industry sector.

Originality/value

The findings would be valuable for academic researchers, managers and professional accounting to acquire a better undemanding of the current status of the implementation of the SysTrust principles (i.e., availability, security, integrity processing, confidentiality, and privacy) as an internal control method for assuring the reliability of AIS by testing the phenomenon in Jordan as a developing country.

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International Journal of Accounting & Information Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1834-7649

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

Fatemeh “Mariam” Zahedi

States that a major problem in dealing with information‐systems reliability is the design of a metric that combines the customer’s needs and preferences with the technical…

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1250

Abstract

States that a major problem in dealing with information‐systems reliability is the design of a metric that combines the customer’s needs and preferences with the technical specifications and modular reliability of information systems. Develops one such metric, combining the customer’s requirements and utility with the technical structure of the system. The result is a single metric that can be used for tracking the performance of an information system and as an early signal of the system’s persistent malfunction and low quality of service. This metric can also contribute to the continuous improvement of system reliability by identifying the components whose improved reliability could make the most significant contribution to the overall reliability of the system.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 14 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Ning Du, John E. McEnroe and Kevin Stevens

The purpose of this paper was to examine whether a less precise (or imprecise) estimate may increase investors’ confidence and improve investors’ perceptions of fair value…

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2679

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine whether a less precise (or imprecise) estimate may increase investors’ confidence and improve investors’ perceptions of fair value reliability. The main criticism of fair value accounting has been its lack of reliability perceived by investors.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 × 3 randomized experiment was used where management incentive and information precision are manipulated.

Findings

The results from this study indicate that perceived reliability is jointly affected by management’s incentives and information precision. Reliability rating is the highest for fair value stated as a point estimate with a specified confidence level attached to it. Further analysis indicates that higher perceived reliability is related to its representational faithfulness because participants perceive that a point estimate with a specified confidence level better matches uncertainty in measuring future cash flows.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine whether a less precise (or imprecise) estimate may increase investors’ confidence and improve investors’ perceptions of fair value reliability. Because of the subjectivity and uncertainty in fair value estimates, less precise fair value estimates may not be viewed as less reliable. In fact, using a precise format to represent fair value estimates may not be appropriate (neither reliable nor credible), because a precise point estimate fails to capture its underlying uncertainty in future cash flows. A less precise format could represent a credible choice for fair value because it reflects uncertainty and subjectivity and effectively communicates management’s assessments of variability in future cash flows.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Eliane Colepicolo

The purpose of this paper is to provide to scientific researchers and academic students some subsidies related to information reliability that may be used during…

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6363

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide to scientific researchers and academic students some subsidies related to information reliability that may be used during information search and retrieval for academic research based on the author’s experience as a university librarian and interdisciplinary researcher.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is composed of a brief conceptualization of the term information reliability, followed by a practical guide containing three processes for obtaining reliable information: knowledge of bibliometric indicators, evaluation of sources of information and analysis of the content of recovered publications.

Findings

Currently, there are few publications about information reliability that target the practical and effective learning of academic researchers and students, based on the experience of librarians who work directly with bibliographic search and training based on scientific literature.

Social implications

The great demand of questions submitted by academic users on how to obtain reliable information shows the need for a paper like this to clarify them.

Originality/value

This paper shares best practices for search and discovery of information reliability, which are based on experiences that are not commonly addressed in the literature, and presents processes covering the bibliometric indicators, information sources and publication contents.

Details

New Library World, vol. 116 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Mark R. Chandler and M. Affan Badar

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of individual components' reliability on a system's reliability. The system refers to the Financial Management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of individual components' reliability on a system's reliability. The system refers to the Financial Management Information System (FMIS), the US Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) web‐based project approval and tracking software. Its components are 61 project information fields.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis would view each highway project‐funding request as an activity with cycle‐dependent performance for which success probability can be calculated as Reliability, R. The reliability analysis of the 61 FMIS fields results in a series system with Rsys the “estimated reliability” of finding “true” values in all 61 information fields during one highway‐related project funding authorization review.

Findings

Of an estimated 200 projects approved, there was previously estimated a 50 percent to 80 percent unreliability rate, while the study found an unreliability rate of approximately 80 percent.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the nature of federal government software, data can be very difficult to acquire in this working environment, but a simple calculation was relatively successful in confirming the “estimated reliability” of finding “true” values and showing how the reliability could dramatically decrease.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the applicability of reliability analysis to project approval software, showing the progression from estimated data to bounding the estimate using reliability theory.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

P.A. Kostagiolas

The role of a reliability analysis for improving the performance of libraries and information services has become extremely crucial. The research question considered here…

Abstract

Purpose

The role of a reliability analysis for improving the performance of libraries and information services has become extremely crucial. The research question considered here is simple and can be summarized as follows: “How reliable is your library?”. Indeed, reliability considerations go beyond the issue of quality since they incorporate the dimension of time, i.e. they involve a number of different activities and operations that take place throughout the life‐cycle of a library system or service. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Inference modelling techniques based on both parametric and nonparametric methods are reviewed and presented together with illustrative examples. From a wide number of non‐parametric methods that have been made available for reliability estimation, the ones examined here are the Kaplan‐Meier and the Cumulative‐hazard methods. Furthermore, parametric methods and applications, which are based on the Weibull distributional model, are examined.

Findings

The nonparametric reliability modelling methods presented are simple to use and suitable for estimating the reliability of information systems and services directly from the available life data. The Weibull analysis is quite useful for a wide range of library management methods, financial applications, for modelling user behaviour within many library settings and systems i.e. digital information systems.

Originality/value

This is among the first implementations of reliability analysis in libraries and information services. This paper provides essential insight to library management researchers and practitioners on how they might incorporate into the library management agenda reliability considerations. The reliability modelling techniques presented can be employed with all types of information services, and not just libraries.

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Bahar Yaşin and Hilal Özen

The internet provides a wide range of technologies that enable health professionals to communicate with people. It ultimately may soon be the primary source for an…

Abstract

Purpose

The internet provides a wide range of technologies that enable health professionals to communicate with people. It ultimately may soon be the primary source for an individual searching for healthcare information, even for emerging economies such as Turkey. This study aims to examine how perceived benefits, perceived quality, and reliability of electronic health (e‐health) information affect intention to repeat e‐health information search behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an announcement on one of the well‐known health web sites in Turkey, 376 out of 386 valid and complete responses were received via an online survey. The data were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis and multiple regressions analysis.

Findings

Results of the study indicate that the personal health issues component of perceived benefit has received the most consistent support as the factor that influences future health information search intention on the internet.

Research limitations/implications

Research findings show that consumers use health web sites as a complementary tool rather than self‐diagnosing. Considering this, suggestions were made for web site designers to concentrate on information needs of consumers especially on personal health issues. Nevertheless, scope of data collection and focusing on intention rather than actual e‐health search behavior are the limitations of this study.

Originality/value

The internet was used by 45 percent of Turkish internet users for searching health‐related information approximately in 2009. So, how do these e‐health information seekers evaluate the benefits, quality, and reliability of e‐health information? Do benefits, quality, and reliability of e‐health information affect future e‐health information search intention? This study is unique in addressing all these questions for Turkish internet users.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Samantha Adams and Marc Berg

This article juxtaposes the history of the book to the current discussions about lay health information on the Internet in order to thoroughly open up the notion of …

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1404

Abstract

This article juxtaposes the history of the book to the current discussions about lay health information on the Internet in order to thoroughly open up the notion of “reliability” that underlies these discussions. It uses the parallels between the two media to improve understanding of what actors are involved and what issues are at stake, as well as how this is consequential for the reliability that is constructed.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2005

Anton Vedder

One of the most significant aspects of Internet, in comparison with other sources of information, such as libraries, books, journals, television, radio etcetera, is that…

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251

Abstract

One of the most significant aspects of Internet, in comparison with other sources of information, such as libraries, books, journals, television, radio etcetera, is that it makes expert knowledge much more accessible to non‐experts than the other traditional sources. This phenomenon has often been applauded for its democratizing effects. Unfortunately, there is also a disadvantage. Expert information that was originally intended for a specific group of people ‐ and not in any way processed or adapted to make it fit for a broader audience ‐ can easily be misunderstood and misinterpreted by non‐experts and, when used as a basis for decisions, lead to unhappy consequences. Can these risks be diminished without limiting the informational freedoms of the information providers and without imposing paternalistic measures regarding the receivers of the information?

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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