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Article

Yanfei Li, Shuntian Yao and Wai‐Mun Chia

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how information and communication technology (ICT) impacts firm performance, by changing the information processing ability of a firm.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how information and communication technology (ICT) impacts firm performance, by changing the information processing ability of a firm.

Design/methodology/approach

It takes the firm as information processing unit to coordinate production in an industry with two‐stage production and demand uncertainty. ICT is assumed to improve the information processing ability. It models that, conditional on the structure of markets described by level of uncertainty, a firm with information processing ability comes into being endogenously from market‐coordinated production, with profit generated.

Findings

It is argued that the profit of the firm depends on both the structure of markets, and the firm's information processing ability. The improving information processing ability increases firm profitability as long as market‐coordinated production persists elsewhere. However, when the improving information processing ability enables enough firms to compete with no market‐coordinated production left, it decreases profitability of all firms. Finally, case studies on the wholesale and retail industry and the finance and insurance industry of ten OECD countries presents consistent evidence that ICT does not necessarily bring better performance.

Originality/value

This paper is an innovation based on several streams of literature to model a firm with the consideration of specialization, demand uncertainty, and information processing ability. It thus provides a different perspective on how ICT contributes to firm performance. It theoretically and empirically shows that such contributions are conditional on market structure of a certain industry.

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Article

Gianluigi Guido, Marco Pichierri, Cristian Rizzo, Verdiana Chieffi and George Moschis

The purpose of this study is to review scholarly research on elderly consumers’ information processing and suggest implications for services marketing.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to review scholarly research on elderly consumers’ information processing and suggest implications for services marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

The review encompasses a five-decade period (1970–2018) of academic research and presents relevant literature in four main areas related to information processing: sensation, attention, interpretation and memory.

Findings

The study illustrates how each of the aforementioned phases of the information processing activity may affect how elderly individuals buy and consume products and services, emphasizing the need for a better comprehension of the elderly to develop effectual marketing strategies.

Originality/value

The study provides readers with detailed state-of-the-art knowledge about older consumers’ information processing, offering a comprehensive review of academic research that companies can use to improve the effectiveness of their marketing efforts that target the elderly market.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article

Paula Rodríguez-Torrico, Sonia San-Martín and Rebeca San José Cabezudo

Nowadays some consumers consider themselves as “omnichannels” – they combine both physical and digital channels expecting a seamless shopping experience – since they view…

Abstract

Purpose

Nowadays some consumers consider themselves as “omnichannels” – they combine both physical and digital channels expecting a seamless shopping experience – since they view their shopping process from a multiple-channel viewpoint. Giving that situation, the aim of this paper is to test the role of consumers’ omnichannel tendency (omni-tendency) in the information processing in the digital channel.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM), emotions as well as utilitarian and hedonic experiences are proposed to understand consumer attitude towards the digital store. Through a survey, data were collected from 284 digital shoppers. PLS path modelling and PLS-MGA were used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results confirm that emotions positively affect the evaluation of the experiences, which in turn improves the attitude towards the digital store. Focusing on the differences among consumers, the findings show that for consumers with low omni-tendency the emotions are key to improve the evaluation of their experiences. Moreover, regarding the attitude, consumers with more omni-tendency follow the central route to process the information; and consumers with less omni-tendency follow the peripheral route.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature in three ways. First, this research includes the study of omni-tendency, as a consumer trait, in the information processing developed in the digital channel, ignored in the literature. Second, this work contributes to information processing theories in digital context confirming, specifically the applicability of ELM into the omnichannel context. This offers support to the application of traditional theories to explain new phenomena. Third, and in line with the previous contribution, this work goes a step further in understanding ELM theory by including other constructs –the omni-tendency and emotions– to explain the information processing in the digital context.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article

Josée Bloemer, Kris Brijs and Hans Kasper

The purpose of this paper is to present an extended version of the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM‐model) to explain and predict which of the four cognitive processes

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an extended version of the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM‐model) to explain and predict which of the four cognitive processes that are distinguished in the literature, with respect to Country of Origin (CoO), can be expected to occur: the halo‐effect, the summary construct‐effect, the product attribute‐effect or the default heuristic‐effect.

Design/methodology/approach

Contrary to most of the previous theoretically‐oriented work on cognitive CoO‐effects, the epistemological background of the CoO‐ELM model proposed in this paper is of an inductive nature with theoretical propositions being derived from empirical data already gathered in the existing studies.

Findings

The outcome of this paper is a flow chart model leading to a set of theoretical propositions on which cognitive CoO‐effects can be expected to occur under different situational contexts.

Research limitations/implications

This paper only focuses on the explanation of cognitive CoO‐effects, not on affective or conative/normative effects. Also, the CoO‐ELM model applies only to the processing of consumers' prior knowledge about a country's products and not about the country itself. Finally, the CoO‐ELM model still needs to be subjected to empirical verification. An important implication of this paper is that the CoO‐ELM framework makes the bulk of empirical data become more transparent given the four effects of cognitive CoO‐processes.

Practical implications

The CoO‐ELM model provides marketing practitioners with an easy and practical tool for the management of CoO‐cues.

Originality/value

This paper is the first attempt trying to catch all the cognitive CoO‐effects previously identified within a theoretically solid framework.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 43 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article

Pien Wang and Peng S. Chan

Extant strategic management literature provides only partialanswers to the important question: what variables affect top managers′ability to process complicated, novel…

Abstract

Extant strategic management literature provides only partial answers to the important question: what variables affect top managers′ ability to process complicated, novel, ambiguous, or dynamic strategic information in a turbulent environment? Drawing on cognitive psychology, personality theory, management theory, organizational theory, and management information systems literature, proposes that nine personal attributes and four contextual attributes affect top managers′ informationprocessing capability. The nine personal attributes are: cognitive complexity, knowledge, mental model of success, openmindedness, time orientation, personal values, tolerance for ambiguity, locus of control, and time devoted to environmental scanning. The four contextual attributes are: rewards and incentives, culture, structure of strategic planning process, and executive support systems. Thirteen propositions are postulated regarding the types of attributes that are conducive for top managers′ ability in processing complicated, novel, ambiguous, or dynamic information.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article

Dawn M. Russell and David Swanson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediators that occupy the gap between information processing theory and supply chain agility. In today’s Mach speed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediators that occupy the gap between information processing theory and supply chain agility. In today’s Mach speed business environment, managers often install new technology and expect an agile supply chain when they press<Enter>. This study reveals the naivety of such an approach, which has allowed new technology to be governed by old processes.

Design/methodology/approach

This work takes a qualitative approach to the dynamic conditions surrounding information processing and its connection to supply chain agility through the assessment of 60 exemplar cases. The situational conditions that have created the divide between information processing and supply chain agility are studied.

Findings

The agility adaptation typology (AAT) defining three types of adaptations and their mediating constructs is presented. Type 1: information processing, is generally an exercise in synchronization that can be used to support assimilation. Type 2: demand sensing, is where companies are able to incorporate real-time data into everyday processes to better understand demand and move toward a real-time environment. Type 3: supply chain agility, requires fundamentally new thinking in the areas of transformation, mindset and culture.

Originality/value

This work describes the reality of today’s struggle to achieve supply chain agility, providing guidelines and testable propositions, and at the same time, avoids “ivory tower prescriptions,” which exclude the real world details from the research process (Meredith, 1993). By including the messy real world details, while difficult to understand and explain, the authors are able to make strides in the AAT toward theory that explains and guides the manager’s everyday reality with all of its messy real world details.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article

Allan Cheng Chieh Lu and Dogan Gursoy

– This study aims to develop a conceptual model demonstrating the antecedents and outcomes of consumers’ online tourism information confusion.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a conceptual model demonstrating the antecedents and outcomes of consumers’ online tourism information confusion.

Design/methodology/approach

A deductive approach was utilized to propose eight variables as antecedents of online confusion and five confusion reduction strategies as outcomes of consumers’ online tourism confusion. The underlying mechanisms in which these variables might lead to consumers’ online tourism information confusion are elaborated using elaboration likelihood model (ELM) (Petty and Cacioppo, 1986) as the major theoretical underpinning.

Findings

The model indicates that consumers could experience overload, similarity and ambiguity confusion when the information acquired is too much, too similar and/or too vague. In addition, as suggested by the ELM (Petty and Cacioppo, 1986), online users who are low in learning orientation, price consciousness, cognition need and Internet experience and high in ambiguity tolerance are more likely to experience confusion because of their lower motivation/ability to process external stimuli.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this study is the lack of empirical test of the proposed model. Another limitation is that only five individual characteristics that might make online consumers prone to confusion were included. Other variables related to individual differences that could influence confusion should be explored as well.

Practical implications

This paper provides valuable implications for online tourism marketers to address consumers’ confusion during information search process. Five individual characteristics proposed as important antecedents of consumers’ confusion can be utilized by online tourism marketers to develop customized online communication strategies for different segments.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the few studies that connect the concept of consumers’ confusion to the online tourism field as well as discuss the concept of consumers’ confusion through the integration of information provider and recipients’ perspective.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Dheeraj Awasthy, Arindam Banerjee and Bibek Banerjee

Existing literature offers conflicting evidence on how prior product knowledge influences amount of information search. A majority of these studies are based on variants…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing literature offers conflicting evidence on how prior product knowledge influences amount of information search. A majority of these studies are based on variants of cost benefit frameworks where consumers engage in search until the benefits from information search exceed search costs. The purpose of this paper is to develop an expectancy theory‐based framework to model consumers' information search and its antecedents, including motivation to search as an intervening construct.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework is tested using data from real consumers engaged in their actual purchase decisions, in an emerging market context, using longitudinal survey research design. The data are analysed using structural equation modeling to test the hypothesized model. The model shows an acceptable fit with X2 (271, 487)=640.252, p < 0.00 and 0.95 CFI.

Findings

Results indicate that the relationship between prior product knowledge to information search is mediated by motivation to search. Prior product knowledge influences motivation to search through its influence on the consumer's perceived ability to search and his/her perceived value of additional information. Furthermore, perceived ability to search is the strongest predictor of motivation to search. The parsimony of the proposed framework in providing a simpler account of factors influencing the search process along with its managerial implications is discussed.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that perceived ability to search and perceived value of additional information are two important levers that managers could use for achieving desired results. Furthermore, perceived ability to search is an important mediator, which completely mediates the relationship between prior product knowledge and motivation to search. These findings also provide strong indications about the need to simplify the search process for consumers, especially in the context when novelty is predominantly marketed.

Originality/value

The paper introduces a motivational measure of search in the literature and shows that the motivational measure is indeed the proximal measure to other antecedent constructs compared to a behavioral measure of search. Perceived ability to search and perceived value of additional information are shown as important mediators between prior product knowledge and motivation to search.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Reflections and Extensions on Key Papers of the First Twenty-Five Years of Advances
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-435-0

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Article

Ulf Aagerup, Anna-Sofia Frank and Evelina Hultqvist

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of rational green packaging claims vs emotional green packaging claims on consumers’ purchase propensity for organic coffee.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of rational green packaging claims vs emotional green packaging claims on consumers’ purchase propensity for organic coffee.

Design/methodology/approach

Three within-subjects experiment were carried out (N=87, N=245, N=60). The experimental design encompasses packaging with rational green claims, emotional green claims, as well as a neutral (control) claim. Measured variables are introduced to assess participants’ environmental commitment and information processing ability. A manipulated between-subjects variable is introduced to test how distraction interacts with preference for the claims.

Findings

Overall, consumers prefer products with green claims over those with neutral (control) claims, and products with emotional green claims to those with rational green claims. The studies also reveal that this effect is moderated by participants’ environmental commitment, information processing ability and by distraction. The findings were statistically significant (p<0.05).

Research limitations/implications

As a lab experiment, the study provides limited generalizability and external validity.

Practical implications

For most organic FMCG products, it is advisable to employ emotional packaging claims.

Social implications

The presented findings provide marketers with tools to influence consumer behavior toward sustainable choices.

Originality/value

The paper validates previous contributions on the effects of product claim types, and extends them by introducing comprehensive empirical data on all the Elaboration Likelihood Model’s criteria for rational decision-making; motivation, opportunity and ability.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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