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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Tony Manning

The purpose of this paper is to present evidence to support the idea that the art of successful influence lies in matching the strategies and style used to the context

1663

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present evidence to support the idea that the art of successful influence lies in matching the strategies and style used to the context. The paper describes research into the relationship between the frequency with which people use six influence strategies, and how they combine them to form various influence styles, and a wide variety of contextual variables found by previous research to be linked to influence behaviour. It is relevant to everyone at work, including leaders, managers and professionals involved in training, development, coaching and mentoring activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The model of influence behaviour identifies six sets of influence strategies used by people at work and three dimensions of influence style, based on research into how people tend to combine these strategies in practice. The research methodology involves looking at the degree of correlation and its statistical significance between the frequency with which people use these influence strategies and styles at work and 33 contextual variables. Data were collected from 161 men and women, at all levels, in a wide variety of public sector organisations in the UK, over a seven‐year period.

Findings

The author found support for the idea that influencing behaviour varied in different contexts. Statistically significant relationships were identified between the frequency of use of influence strategies and styles and the 33 contextual variables. Clusters of contextual variables were also shown to be related to influencing behaviour. It was argued that these findings can be used to guide action.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for the development of leaders and managers. The model of interpersonal influence allows individuals to identify their particular situation and draw conclusions, rooted in theory and derived from research, about how to enhance their effectiveness in influencing others at work.

Originality/value

The originality and value of this paper lies in the way in which it extends and develops previous theory and research, including that by the author and collaborators published in previous editions of Industrial and Commercial Training, thereby validating the model and the research instruments used to operationalise it. The findings confirm that influencing behaviour does vary in different contexts and provides evidence that clearly indicates the particular contextual variables linked to the frequency of use of specific influence strategies and styles.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Mark Farrell and Bill Schroder

Builds on work in organisational buying. Examines the relationship between power bases and influence strategies in an organisational buying situation, specifically, the…

4502

Abstract

Builds on work in organisational buying. Examines the relationship between power bases and influence strategies in an organisational buying situation, specifically, the decision to purchase the services of an advertising agency. Hypothesises the influence strategies of consultation, coalition, legitimating pressure, exchange, rational persuasion, inspirational appeals and personal appeals, related to source characteristics (power bases). Findings from 150 organisational buying decisions support findings from a recent study in the USA. Suggests that the use of an influence strategy is positively related to the corresponding type of power.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 33 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Michael Jay Polonsky and Don Scott

This paper seeks to examine whether the stakeholder strategy matrix provides useful guidance for managers in dealing with stakeholders. The matrix suggests that strategies

10760

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine whether the stakeholder strategy matrix provides useful guidance for managers in dealing with stakeholders. The matrix suggests that strategies for dealing with stakeholders can be determined based on stakeholder ability to cooperate and threaten organisational outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a hypothetical scenario looking at the development of a new environmentally friendly product, where eight stakeholder groups and their influencing abilities are manipulated. Marketers reviewed one version of the scenario and were then asked the applicability of 13 strategies for each stakeholder group described. Mixed design analysis is then undertaken to examine the direct effects and interactions between the four combinations of influencing abilities, the stakeholder group examined or how the strategy suggested impacted on managers' views.

Findings

The research found that there was an interaction effect suggesting that some strategies were more applicable to stakeholders with certain sets of influencing abilities, as the stakeholder strategy matrix suggested. The specific stakeholder group examined also appeared to impact on managers' views, which is inconsistent with the theory.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations are that the research focused on managers' perceptions of the applicability of strategies, rather than the actual success of strategies examined. Research into the effectiveness of actual behaviours would possibly require more in‐depth examination of case studies.

Practical implications

The research suggests that the stakeholder strategy matrix may provide some guidance as to how managers deal with stakeholders. However, it also suggests that managers may be implicitly applying influencing abilities to groups irrespective of their “trueinfluencing ability. In this case managers are in fact ignoring valuable information when deciding how to interact with stakeholders and therefore possibly using less effective strategies to interact with stakeholders.

Originality/value

The research is unique as it looks at determining whether different types of strategies for dealing with stakeholders are perceived to be more or less effective. This therefore seeks to make stakeholder theory more strategic and applicable in a broader set of contexts. As such the paper would be of interest to managers seeking to understand better how to deal with stakeholders and to theorists seeking to understand better how stakeholder theory impacts on organisational outcomes.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 39 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

U.D.R.E. Ruwanpura and B.A.K.S. Perera

Accelerating the influences of external stakeholders in any construction project is inevitable. Studies on external stakeholder influence on construction projects and…

Abstract

Purpose

Accelerating the influences of external stakeholders in any construction project is inevitable. Studies on external stakeholder influence on construction projects and literature on external stakeholder management in irrigation infrastructure projects executed with donor funds are scarce. Thus, this study aimed to investigate how to manage the external stakeholders' influence on donor-funded irrigation infrastructure projects effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed approach consisting of 17 semi-structured interviews and two rounds of questionnaire surveys was adopted to rank the following: the types of external stakeholders who can significantly influence irrigation infrastructure projects, significant influencing strategies used by those stakeholders, and significant strategies that can be adopted to manage external stakeholder influence on the projects.

Findings

In total, 12 of external stakeholders who can significantly influence irrigation infrastructure projects were identified; 17 significant influencing strategies used by external project stakeholders and 22 significant strategies used to manage external stakeholder influence on the projects were identified. The influencing/management strategies specific to each external stakeholder type and those that are common to all external stakeholder types were identified separately. The grievance redress mechanism should be activated for managing external stakeholder influence on donor-funded irrigation infrastructure projects.

Originality/value

This study contributes to theory by identifying significant strategies that can be used to manage external stakeholder influence on donor-funded irrigation infrastructure projects during the planning and design stages. The study will help project teams to handle external stakeholder influence on the projects successfully, accomplish project objectives, and make maximum utilization of the donor funds received.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2021

M.K.C.S. Wijewickrama, Nicholas Chileshe, Raufdeen Rameezdeen and J. Jorge Ochoa

The purpose of this paper is twofold: firstly, to identify the information-centric strategies of external stakeholders that influence the quality assurance (QA) in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: firstly, to identify the information-centric strategies of external stakeholders that influence the quality assurance (QA) in the reverse logistics supply chains (RLSC) of demolition waste (DW) and, secondly, to recognize the determinants for using each strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 professionals representing five external stakeholder groups: state and local government agencies, non-government organizations (NGOs), forward supply chain upstream and downstream actors. The data was analyzed based on Creswell's five-step process, and the conventional content analysis was used for coding and generating themes.

Findings

The study found seven information-centric influence strategies: regulating, monitoring, leading, incentivizing, demolition approval, forming contracts and specifications. The state government organizations were the most dominant in influencing the QA in RLSC. All external stakeholders use both aggressive and cooperative strategies. The urgent, legitimate and economic core of the issue decides the type of strategy to exert an information-centric influence over the QA in RLSC of DW.

Originality/value

To the author's best knowledge, this study is one of the first investigations performed based on a theoretical basis within the context of RLSC in the construction industry (CI). This study used empirical data to elaborate the stakeholder theory while providing new knowledge on stakeholder influence, particularly those relevant to information sharing. Thus, this study developed a theoretical base that future researchers in the study domain could use.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2008

Hae‐Ching Chang and Chi‐Huang Lin

The purpose of this paper is to provide a guidance for boundary personnel regarding how to use influence strategies to increase channel satisfaction across relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a guidance for boundary personnel regarding how to use influence strategies to increase channel satisfaction across relationship development process.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper investigates the use of influence strategies and their impact on channel satisfaction across formation, operation, and maintenance stage from Das and Teng's viewpoint. The sample from Taiwanese manufacture in electronic, information and motors industry involving buyer‐supplier relationships, and asks respondents (sales manager) to select a newer customer to complete a questionnaire for enable sufficient responses to be obtained, representing different stages of the buyer‐supplier relationship.

Findings

The results indicate that the frequency of requests, promises, legalistic pleas, and threat strategies differ significantly among relationship stages. Additionally, information exchange, recommendations, and request strategies have dramatic effect on channel satisfaction across different stages.

Originality/value

This paper proposes the most appropriate model for channel managers to apply influence strategies judiciously in each relationship stage.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2016

Kirsten Scully and Miguel Moital

The purpose of this paper is to examine peer influence in the context of purchasing collectively consumed products. The particular focus of the paper is on strategies used…

1215

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine peer influence in the context of purchasing collectively consumed products. The particular focus of the paper is on strategies used by university students for persuasion and resistance when attending events and festivals.

Design/methodology/approach

Five females and three males studying for a degree in the UK were interviewed. Independent analysis of the interview transcripts was undertaken to identify persuasion and resistance strategies, as well as the factors influencing a strategy’s success.

Findings

A number of persuasion and resistance strategies are used and certain strategies use specific language techniques. Some of these strategies are only applicable to reference groups who have a history of consuming products together, as they resort to past experiences as a means of producing a persuasion or resistance argument. The extent to which the influence is successful is also discussed as being very subjective and dependent on the particular context of the persuasion exercise.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to exclusively examine peer influence in the context of collectively consumed products, notably influence and resistance strategies and the conditions which can make these effective. The paper illustrates the types of strategies peers use when attending events, in particular those used by people who live in a fairly close social system (university study) and where there is no formal hierarchy (in contrast with parent–children influence). The context can influence the types of strategies used, for example, the nature of the relationship between students, which is based on high levels of trust, makes it inappropriate to use certain strategies.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Leonidas C. Leonidou

Despite the critical role of the industrial buying situation in shaping buyer behavior and seller response, little research has been conducted to augment extant knowledge…

6850

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the critical role of the industrial buying situation in shaping buyer behavior and seller response, little research has been conducted to augment extant knowledge on the subject. To fill this gap, this article focuses on influence strategies that industrial buyers exert on their suppliers in different buying situations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study received information from 122 Greek producers of industrial goods through a mail survey based on a semi‐structured questionnaire. This incorporated 24 influence strategies equally divided into six groups (legalistic, coercive, reward, expert, referent, and informational), and respondents were asked to specify their degree of agreement or disagreement, whether these are used by their customers in three buying situations (straight re‐buy, modified re‐buy, and new task).

Findings

The study revealed that: industrial customers use a wide array of influence strategies, with those based on referent, expert, or legalistic sources being more widely employed; influence strategies vary in degree of application according to buying situation, and are least used by new‐task buyers; and straight re‐buyers tend to make greater use of expert, referent, and, to some extent, legalistic influence strategies, while modified re‐buyers employ more coercive and, to a lesser extent, information‐based influence strategies. Overall, influence strategies play an important role in industrial buying behavior, requiring sellers to treat customers differently in each buying situation.

Originality/value

Several suggestions for future research are provided, such as replicating the study in different geographic contexts, monitoring changes of influence strategies as a buyer moves from one buying situation to another, and investigating the countervailing actions taken by suppliers.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Po‐Young Chu, Kuo‐Hsiung Chang and Hsu‐Feng Huang

This study aims to examine the means by which influence strategies and social mechanisms (trust and shared vision) influence the flexibility of suppliers, and its ultimate…

1134

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the means by which influence strategies and social mechanisms (trust and shared vision) influence the flexibility of suppliers, and its ultimate effect on the performance of manufacturers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study bases the major components of marketing research on previous studies related to influence strategies and flexibility in the supply‐chain. This empirical study utilized 162 SMIT survey samples.

Findings

Results show that using coercive influence strategies and developing a shared vision promote supplier flexibility and fully mediate the effects of trust on supplier flexibility. In addition, supplier flexibility has a significant positive impact on the performance of manufacturers.

Research limitations/implications

The perceptions of manufacturers regarding influence strategies and social mechanisms formed the basis of this study. Future studies could focus on the reciprocal strategies of suppliers, and the influence of these actions on the effectiveness of the influence strategies employed by manufacturers.

Practical implications

This paper adds to the existing management guidelines addressing the problem of ensuring increased flexibility from suppliers to enable a more rapid response to the demands of customers to enhance performance.

Originality/value

The paper provides novel insights into the impact of influence strategies and social mechanisms on the flexibility of suppliers.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2018

Chankon Kim, Hanjoon Lee and Sang-Lin Han

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of family communication patterns (FCP) on adolescents’ choice of influence strategies and parents’ choice of response…

1319

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of family communication patterns (FCP) on adolescents’ choice of influence strategies and parents’ choice of response strategies in situations of parent–child purchase decision disagreement.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses family triadic (mother–father–child) survey data collected from 294 Korean families. The study develops classifications of adolescent influence strategies and parental response strategies in the initial stage and subsequently investigates the impact of FCP on the adolescent child’s use of influence strategies and each parent’s use of response strategies. The final stage of the study involved an exploratory investigation aimed at discovering the adolescent influence strategies and parental response strategies that are likely used in conjunction.

Findings

Results show an overall significant impact of FCP on both adolescents’ use of influence strategies and parents’ use of response strategies. They further reveal that Korean mothers tended to encounter their children’s persistent influence attempts with unyielding, strict response strategies. The types of response strategies used by Korean fathers were not linked to particular types of influence strategies used by their children but linked to their level of education attained and household income.

Practical implications

Findings of this study may help marketers formulate an appropriate marketing communication strategy that can be effective in resolving parent–child purchase disagreement.

Originality/value

With its focus on the adolescent influence strategies, parental response strategies, and FCP as a factor influencing the strategy choice by adolescents and parents, this study provides new insights into the parent–child interaction taking place in situations of parent–child disagreement about a purchase decision.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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