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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Tuulia Puustinen, Kyösti Pennanen, Heidi Falkenbach, Anne Arvola and Kauko Viitanen

The purpose of this paper is to study views of owner-occupiers concerning infill development as a mechanism for financing major repairs in apartment buildings and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study views of owner-occupiers concerning infill development as a mechanism for financing major repairs in apartment buildings and financial benefits they require from the infill development for accepting it near their homes (on the plot of their housing company).

Design/methodology/approach

The data used draws upon a survey of 894 respondents concerning residents’ views on infill development in Finland. The required financial benefits from the infill development were questioned in both relative proportions of the expenses related to major repairs and concrete monetary sums.

Findings

First, the findings indicate that the financial benefits owner-occupiers require in order to accept infill development are significant, covering about two-thirds of the costs of major repairs during following ten years or over 75 percent of an (imagined) upcoming pipeline repair. Second, approximately one-fifth of the respondents regard that no economic benefit is enough to make them support infill development. Third, people’s decision-making concerning infill development is complex, involving also many other factors than monetary.

Practical implications

This paper provides insight into the feasibility of infill development as a means to finance major repairs from the perspective of owner-occupiers. The paper has strong policy implications as it highlights the significance of the public authorities and their policies in enabling the infill development.

Originality/value

This is the first academic study to focus on owner-occupiers views and financial requirements for the infill development as a means to finance major repairs in apartment buildings.

Details

Property Management, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 March 2020

Fredrik Brunes, Cecilia Hermansson, Han-Suck Song and Mats Wilhelmsson

This paper aims to analyze how nearby property prices are affected by new construction projects in Stockholm. If there is an impact on property prices, the authors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze how nearby property prices are affected by new construction projects in Stockholm. If there is an impact on property prices, the authors endeavor to investigate whether the effects vary among different areas within the municipality, for different groups of inhabitants and for different types of housing (i.e. public versus private housing).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a difference-in-difference specification in a hedonic model, and the sample consists of more than 90,000 observations over the period 2005-2013.

Findings

The results are robust and indicate that house prices in nearby areas increase following the completion of infill development. The results also indicate that infill development has a positive spillover effect on nearby dwelling prices only in areas with lower incomes, more public housing units and more inhabitants born abroad.

Originality/value

It provides an analysis on how nearby property prices are affected by new construction projects by creating a restricted control area, so as to make the treatment group and the control group more homogeneous. Thus, it mitigates any potential problems with spatial dependency, which can cause biased standard errors.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research , vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2017

Kyösti Pennanen, Tuulia Puustinen and Anne Arvola

The purpose of this paper is to analyse what constitutes trust for residents in the infill development context, who are the targets of trust, and does residents’ trust…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse what constitutes trust for residents in the infill development context, who are the targets of trust, and does residents’ trust predict their attitudes towards infill development.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were carried out. A qualitative study in three housing developments was followed by a quantitative study with 906 respondents in the Helsinki area, Finland.

Findings

Four stakeholders relevant to the residents’ trust were identified: the board of housing development, the housing manager, city planners, and construction companies. Three dimensions were found to constitute residents’ trust in these stakeholders (competence, benevolence and integrity). Furthermore, analyses revealed that trust in city planners and construction companies significantly predicted residents’ attitudes towards infill development.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study have implications on the management of the infill development process. More attention should be paid to how residents’ perceptions of trust towards the other stakeholders are formed in order to facilitate successful infill projects. The quantitative study was carried out in different residential areas. Based on this study, the authors were not able to analyse whether and how the characteristics of the residential areas might influence the results, which represents a limitation of this study.

Originality/value

This paper provides in-depth insights into the role of trust in explaining residents’ attitudes towards infill development. Previous research devoted to the topic is scarce, neglects residents’ perspectives and lacks empirical evidence. The discussions are mainly contemplation based on case examples. No previous studies have explicitly studied the significance of trust with large samples.

Details

Property Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Jia Beisi

Each person in Hong Kong produces three times more waste than that of Singapore. This is because a large portion of the waste in Hong Kong is from the construction sector…

Abstract

Each person in Hong Kong produces three times more waste than that of Singapore. This is because a large portion of the waste in Hong Kong is from the construction sector. Re-decoration work carried out by dwellers in Hong Kong is one of the major sources of the construction and demolition waste. Development of flexible reusable infill systems with high recycling potential is significant. A number of these systems are currently used, mainly in public and commercial buildings. They may have potential to be applied in residential buildings in the future.

This paper starts with an introduction to the infill systems applied in open building history. It then points out the need to investigate the development of infill processes by integrating infill products available in the market. The paper further introduces current open building studies on reusability of infill systems and addresses the problem that there is a lack of quantitative information on embodied energy and other environmental impacts of infill systems.

In the methodology section the paper describes five types of partition walls selected, ranging from low flexibility to high flexibility. Applying an evaluation model for environmental impact, the paper analyzes embodied energy intensity, and environmental impacts of each partition systems in two simulated situations. One is in a two room unit of a public housing prototype and the other is in private apartment. It concludes that partition walls with higher flexibility are highly intensive in their embodied energy. In other environmental impacts, especially recycling potential, flexible partition wall panels exceed that of conventional block-work partitions. The study will enable more complete information to be obtained concerning the environmental impact of infill components and will assist architects and other building professional wisely apply open building design concepts.

Details

Open House International, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Mitra Seyyedpour Esmaeilzadeh, Ahad Nejad Ebrahimi and Vahid Vaziri

Sustainability is one of the major factors in the way of creating new structures in historical contexts. The economic principle plays a very significant role in…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability is one of the major factors in the way of creating new structures in historical contexts. The economic principle plays a very significant role in sustainability besides the environmental and social components. Tabriz Historic Bazaar that has been inscribed on the World Heritage list has witnessed various developments in its surrounding area over recent years. The purpose of this study is to analyze the infill structure indicators in this region in terms of economic sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

First, based on related literature reviews and approaches, the indicators that should be considered in the creation of infill structures in historical contexts were collected. Later, by considering the vicinity zone of Tabriz Historic Bazaar, the effect of each indicator on the economic sustainability of the building was gathered by means of AHP questionnaires and in-person interviews with experts and analyzed by the Expert Choice software.

Findings

The findings present a guideline which indicates that the type of materials being used is the most important factor in order to create an economically sustainable infill structure in this setting. Accordance with the Climate of the region ranks second place and the Cultural land-use as the Suitable land use for this site goes for the third. The mentioned guideline includes 25 indicators and can help designers with a clear path.

Originality/value

This paper clarifies the order of indicators' importance for enhancing the design and consequently function of infill structures, being built in this historic context, with the aim of economic sustainability. The prioritization of indicators in this research depends mainly on their relevance to the conditions of the study area, but the methodology can be used helpfully in similar cases.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Handbook of Transport Geography and Spatial Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-615-83253-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Karina Landman

As is the case internationally, there is also an increased focus on urban space diversity in South Africa. Is it appropriate to pursue place diversity in South Africa? If…

Abstract

As is the case internationally, there is also an increased focus on urban space diversity in South Africa. Is it appropriate to pursue place diversity in South Africa? If so, what are the design factors that support place diversity and can these be accommodated by the development of medium density mixed housing in the country? Furthermore, could these emerging trends be considered as part of a larger global trend moving towards greater place diversity in cities, or does it only offer local fragments and practices of fashionable international ideas? This paper explores the multiple meanings of place diversity in the country as evident in the development of medium density mixed housing developments and highlights a number of paradoxes that emerge as a result of the context-specific realities.

Details

Open House International, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Tingting Liu, Sherif Mostafa, Sherif Mohamed and Tuan Son Nguyen

Cities are facing challenges with their smart city agenda due to tighter budget constraints, varied interests of different stakeholders and increasing needs of…

Abstract

Purpose

Cities are facing challenges with their smart city agenda due to tighter budget constraints, varied interests of different stakeholders and increasing needs of technological innovation. Therefore, cities are partnering with private organisations to advance smart city projects. This research critically analyses the existing research published on public-private partnerships (PPPs) for the development of smart city projects and aims to identify the emerging themes and recommend mechanisms and strategies for improved use of smart city PPPs.

Design/methodology/approach

The content/textual analysis was conducted on 52 research publications relating to PPP and smart city from 2001 to 2020. With the assistance of the Leximancer software, the related literature was systematically analysed and synthesised to present the emerging themes of PPP application within the smart city context.

Findings

The analyses reveal that smart city PPPs mainly concentrated on building new or improving existing infrastructure. The research identifies five themes on PPP application for smart city development: (1) Technological innovation integration and increased risk profile, (2) Smart citizen engagement and participatory governance, (3) Data sharing and information security, (4) Transformation of PPP process and approach and (5) PPPs for urban sustainability. This research consolidates these five themes in a proposed sustainable public-private-people partnership (PPPP) framework.

Originality/value

This research provides a new perspective on rethinking the extant PPP models by highlighting the emerging themes in the PPP application for smart city development. This study provides useful recommendations for smart city infrastructure project partnership and engagement among the public and private sectors, and the city residents.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Rolf Barlindhaug and Berit Irene Nordahl

This paper aims to investigate whether developers’ ask lower prices on homes in redevelopment sites than they do on similar units in smaller developments completed over a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether developers’ ask lower prices on homes in redevelopment sites than they do on similar units in smaller developments completed over a shorter time span. It also investigates whether developers price units differently at different stages of the redevelopment process. The development of designated redevelopment areas often consists of multiple projects spread across several years, some in parallel, some sequential. New units are put on the market in a piecemeal fashion, and infrastructure, shared green spaces and shared facilities are installed successively.

Design/methodology/approach

A hedonic price model is used to analyse sales prices of 7,000 new apartments in Oslo sold between 2011 and 2015, all else being equal. The paper distinguishes between infill as one-stage projects, and multi-staged competitive and multi-staged monopolistic redevelopments.

Findings

Dwellings in redevelopment projects sell at a lower price than similar dwellings in infill projects. In competitive redevelopments, those in charge of the last projects put a slightly higher price on apartments. In redevelopments involving only one developer, the last stages ask the lowest prices.

Research limitations/implications

This research expands our understanding of developers’ pricing behaviour. Developers supplying housing for the private market through redevelopments land are willing to take risks particularly in the initial stage.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that credit institutions financing developers’ projects need to take into account the structure of selling prices, including lower prices and higher risk of pursuing redevelopment projects.

Social implications

Gaining a better understanding of developers’ pricing behaviour deepens our insights into the dynamics of market-led urban brownfield developments; this knowledge may moreover inform policies on sustainable urban growth.

Originality/value

An original investigation of housing transactions in urban brownfield sites in Oslo provides fresh insights into developers’ pricing behaviour.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Antti Tapio Kurvinen and Tanja Tyvimaa

Even as many countries are facing changes in demographic profile and new types of senior housing developments are becoming more important, there is limited evidence for…

Abstract

Purpose

Even as many countries are facing changes in demographic profile and new types of senior housing developments are becoming more important, there is limited evidence for the development impact of a senior house on surrounding residential property values. The purpose of this paper is to address the void in knowledge, investigating the impact of senior house developments on apartment values in Tampere, Finland.

Design/methodology/approach

To specify valuation effects of proximate senior house development projects, advanced research design combining propensity score matching procedure and hedonic pricing models is used.

Findings

The results show that a senior house development has a significant positive impact on proximate residential property values within a 500 metre radius. The impact is found to be the highest in underdeveloped neighbourhoods. Nevertheless, in neighbourhoods where property values and demand for housing units are higher and senior house developments fall into the criteria of infill development, a premium is lower, but still statistically significant and notable in magnitude.

Research limitations/implications

This paper studies apartment values only in Tampere, Finland, and it is important to notice that local regulations and market conditions may have a notable impact on the outcomes from senior house developments.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to address a number of empirical issues and provide with statistically significant evidence for positive impacts from senior house developments – encouraging investors and developers to build senior houses.

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