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1 – 10 of 107
Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Kátia Eloisa Bertol, Patricia Liebesny Broilo, Lélis Balestrin Espartel and Kenny Basso

This study aimed to understand young children’s influence on family consumer behavior by examining children's and parents’ points of view in the Brazilian context.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to understand young children’s influence on family consumer behavior by examining children's and parents’ points of view in the Brazilian context.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an exploratory approach, the study used focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. Specifically, to elicit children’s perceptions, two focus groups were conducted, and to capture the perspective of the parents, 8 families, via 12 participants, were interviewed.

Findings

Children’s use of information provided by the media in their attempts to influence family decisions is perceived positively by parents because such behavior helps parents to fulfill their parental duties.

Research implications

This study examines how young children perceive their influential role in family consumer decisions and how parents perceive this influence, given the existence of child adultization and adult infantilization.

Originality/value

The findings extend the discussions regarding the adultization of children and the infantilization of adults, revealing positive aspects of such a trend in association with consumer behavior.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2018

Antonio Francesco Maturo and Veronica Moretti

According to Barber (2007), the consumer society fosters the growth of an infantile ethos. This happens because infantilization of the consumer is the best way to create…

Abstract

According to Barber (2007), the consumer society fosters the growth of an infantile ethos. This happens because infantilization of the consumer is the best way to create new needs that the market can then answer with new goods and services. Given that neoliberalism encourages individual consumers to remain, at least partially, infantile, what position can boring, difficult, “adult” activities occupy in a neoliberal society? Exertion and hard work are in fundamental opposition to infantilization. In a neoliberal culture, then, “serious” activities – like labor, hard work, and other boring things – must be dressed up as pleasant pastimes. Today, thanks to apps, it is possible to work, practice self-care, or study under the guise of playing a game. Clearly, then, gamification – the transformation of boring tasks into pleasurable activities – is consistent with and symptomatic of the broader infantilization promoted by consumeristic capitalism.

Gamification is a fundamental feature of several health apps. When using these apps, we earn rewards and points (depending on what we do). We thus engage in a pleasurable self-governance driven by our own aspirations and capacities. Gamified self-tracking is, then, the opposite of work and work activities. It increases our productivity without oppressing us – at least at first glance. This (apparent) self-governance is a funny and pleasurable taylorism of everyday life.

Details

Digital Health and the Gamification of Life: How Apps Can Promote a Positive Medicalization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-366-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Barbara Czarniawska and Gideon Kunda

The purpose of this paper is to understand the persistent ambiguity of socialization practices in US and Swedish organizations, which promote a mature work identity while…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the persistent ambiguity of socialization practices in US and Swedish organizations, which promote a mature work identity while infantilizing their employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Application of the insights from modernist authors' analysis of modernity as experienced by a human subject within professional organizations (Gombrowicz and Musil) and as responsible for proliferation of layers of reality (Eco), to contemporary practices of socialization.

Findings

The conflict between the need to conform to the corporate culture and the temptation to subvert them for creative or destructive purposes results in production of a “person without qualities,” and in the rise of the contemporary form of hyperreal infantocracy, which requires sophisticated irony in order to deal with organizational practices.

Research limitations/implications

Paying more attention to literary analysts of contemporary condition such as Gombrowicz, Musil, Eco, and Kundera will allow to understand paradoxes of contemporary organizing beyond the limits of traditional social sciences.

Practical implications

Combating apathy and disillusion among both employees and human resource management practitioners requires a reconceptualization of the programs of organizational socialization in terms of a sustainable and responsible corporate citizenship.

Originality/value

Few authors have managed to mine the humanist heritage in order to salvage insights, which might have practical implications for a more balanced, sustainable, and humane organizational reality.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2018

Thomas Raymen

This ethnographic chapter takes the reader into the wider lifeworlds of the ethnographic participants of this study and their entrepreneurial efforts to make a living from…

Abstract

This ethnographic chapter takes the reader into the wider lifeworlds of the ethnographic participants of this study and their entrepreneurial efforts to make a living from the increasingly commodified and sportified world of lifestyle sports. It contextualises this trend within the challenges, barriers and anxieties that surround youth transitions into adulthood in late-capitalism; the increasingly blurred line between work and leisure and the rise of ‘prosumption’ and its impact upon modes of capital accumulation.

Details

Parkour, Deviance and Leisure in the Late-Capitalist City: An Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-812-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Richard C. Warren

The purpose of this paper is to examine the new alcohol debate and put it into historical perspective, before outlining the meaning and nature of the new temperance challenge.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the new alcohol debate and put it into historical perspective, before outlining the meaning and nature of the new temperance challenge.

Design/methodology/approach

A moral perspective on the patterns of alcohol consumption from the point of view of character virtue is offered in order to address this deep‐seated cultural problem.

Findings

Facts and figures on the nature and extent of Britain's alcohol problem are used to illustrate the strength of present day concerns.

Research limitations/implications

The acquisition of temperance in today's society is very difficult in the face of affluence and a consumer culture, which encourages impulsiveness and infantilisation especially when it comes to drinking alcohol. The particular problems of the UK are exacerbated by cultural factors and patterns of family structure, which also undermine the acquiring of the virtue of temperance.

Practical implications

Today's drink problem is a problem of character that has to be tackled by all the institutions of civil society, the family, religious groups, and communities. The drinks industry in its widest sense can also play its part in developing a culture of temperance.

Originality/value

The contention of the paper is that unless the cultivation of some notion of temperance is reverted as a shared virtue of character, today's alcohol problem will not successfully be tackled.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Peter Bates, Sam Smith and Robert Nisbet

Local policies often prohibit care staff from online contact with the people they support. The purpose of this paper is to review the reasons put forward for this ban and…

Abstract

Purpose

Local policies often prohibit care staff from online contact with the people they support. The purpose of this paper is to review the reasons put forward for this ban and seek explanations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines relevant literature on the use of social networking by disabled and nondisabled people. This paper offers a critique of common policies and justifications and poses a challenge to those who impose such regulations.

Findings

The paper finds no support for current policies.

Research limitations/implications

The authors found only a limited amount of research in this area, and research findings were not commonly utilised by policy makers.

Practical implications

Policy makers and regulators need to take a more rigorous and person-centred approach to rule making in respect of social media.

Social implications

A widespread ban on the use of social media in communications between staff and the people they support is exposed as paternalistic and exacerbating infantilisation and exclusion rather than seeing disabled people as digital citizens. Regulators and those with responsibilities for safeguarding need to adopt a more empowering and person-centred approach.

Originality/value

This paper will only make a difference if regulators and those with responsibilities for safeguarding adopt a more empowering and person-centred approach rather than the fear-based blanket prohibitions that have applied to date.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2018

Amy Yau and Sofia Christidi

A growing stream of consumer research has examined the family dynamics and consumption practices that come from the changing life stages. This study aims to better…

Abstract

Purpose

A growing stream of consumer research has examined the family dynamics and consumption practices that come from the changing life stages. This study aims to better understand the narratives surrounding power struggles emanating from continued parental food provision upon the stages of adulthood. The study illustrates the contestations within the family as well as the strategies that recipients use to alleviate these tensions within the context of adult Greek daughters and sons.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used in-depth narrative interviews with 17 Greek consumers together with photo elicitation to examine consumers’ power struggles in experiencing continued food provision within the family.

Findings

The study demonstrates that continued food provision affects the stages of adulthood. The adult children go through a journey of negotiation and struggles of power arising within parental food provision practices. The study demonstrates four power-based struggles and four negotiation strategies to cope with and alleviate the contestations.

Research limitations

Such exploration allowed insights to emerge in relation to the narratives of sons and daughters themselves. However, there are two other relational partners – the food providers and the partners of the food recipients – whose perspectives were not captured but would further aid understanding if captured in future research.

Practical implications

The authors show that consumption practices at home can be a source of friction; thus, food related practices outside the family home can be encouraged to mitigate tensions. The findings could inform advertising campaigns and marketing strategies regarding the loving yet challenging family relationship.

Social implications

The authors encourage mothers to be reflective on the tendency towards continued provision, as the food provision contributes to the daughter and son’s sense of protracted adulthood stages. Insights from the study are applicable to family tensions in other contexts such as the boomerang generation.

Originality/value

This study focuses on a stage of family life and from a perspective of the recipient, both areas which have been previously under explored. The theoretical perspectives of power are used to contribute to areas of food and family consumption by showing how the provision of food marks meanings of love, but also reveals sources of power and contention. The study also contributes by exploring the role of food consumption in the protraction of adulthood.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2021

Abdelmajid Amine, Audrey Bonnemaizon and Margaret Josion-Portail

The purpose of this paper is to show that the categorization of elderly patients as vulnerable is affected by health-care service interactions with caregivers, which may…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that the categorization of elderly patients as vulnerable is affected by health-care service interactions with caregivers, which may increase, reduce or even negate entirely elderly patients’ vulnerable status.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports the results of a qualitative study based on in-depth interviews conducted with a large and varied sample of health-care personnel in charge of elderly patients in two hospital geriatric departments in France.

Findings

Findings show that the limits of the service-dominant logic approach when the service (care) relationship concerns vulnerable individuals who are, completely or partially, unable to take part in the co-creation of the service and the roles played by caregivers as resource integrators (intermediaries, facilitatorapomediaries and transformativeapomediaries) and that this affects the categorization of elderly patients as vulnerable.

Research limitations/implications

The results enrich knowledge about the service relationship with vulnerable people by showing that the categorization of elderly patients as vulnerable is not immutable but stems from the dynamics among actors that may variously “reify it” (contribute to its internalization), “reduce it” (enable access to aspects of normal life), or “neutralize it” (help free this cohort from their categorization as vulnerable).

Practical implications

The findings provide insights for care providers by stressing the need to raise awareness among hospital staff regarding their active role in affecting the categorization of elderly patients as vulnerable through their care practices. In the context of public health policies, the findings show that the regulatory injunction to empower patients to preserve their well-being tends to produce the opposite effect on the frailest patients, who are unable to participate in their care pathway.

Originality/value

The research shows that categorization as vulnerable, in the health-care services context, is affected by the care interactions between caregivers and elderly patients. The support provided to hospital staff in this context helps to maintain patients’ well-being and dignity.

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2011

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

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Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

In the UK, 2010 saw the 40th anniversary of its Equal Pay Act, which was an attempt to bridge the yawning divide at that time between men's and women's pay by making it illegal for salaries to differ for the sexes for doing the same job. However a number of studies in the anniversary year sought to re‐examine the problems in the UK on the issue, and highlighted that the gender divide was still very much alive and well, and that the UK was lagging behind its European cousins.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Ruth McDonald, Anne Rogers and Wendy Macdonald

Purpose – This paper aims to explore the ways in which practice nurses engage in identity work in the context of chronic disease management in primary care and assess the…

1004

Abstract

Purpose – This paper aims to explore the ways in which practice nurses engage in identity work in the context of chronic disease management in primary care and assess the extent to which this is compatible with the identities promoted in government policy. Design/methodology/approach – The paper draws on qualitative interviews with nurses applying the concepts of “identity threat” and Hegel's Master‐Slave dialectic to explore the implications of nurse‐patient interdependence for identity in a policy context which aims to promote self‐management and patient empowerment. Findings – The nurses in the study showed little sign of adapting their identities in line with government policies intended to empower health care “consumers”. Instead, various aspects of identity work were identified which can be seen as helping to defend against identity threat and maintain and reproduce the traditional order. Practical implications – The paper provides information on barriers to self‐management that are likely to inhibit the implementation of government policy. Originality/value – Whilst much has been written on the extent to which patients are dependent on health professionals, the issue of professional dependence on patients has received much less attention. The paper hightlights how viewing the nurse‐patient relationship in the context of a struggle for mastery related to identity represents a departure from traditional approaches and sheds light on hitherto unexplored barriers to self‐management.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

1 – 10 of 107