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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Liu Linqing, Tan Liwen and Ma Haiyan

Massive increases in international trade and investment extend industries beyond national borders, so states and enterprises have become the two critical players in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Massive increases in international trade and investment extend industries beyond national borders, so states and enterprises have become the two critical players in the boundary of industries. The purpose of this paper is to provide a new conceptual framework to analyze the role of states and enterprises in enhancing the industrial international competitiveness (IIC).

Design/methodology/approach

Being a research‐based paper, the topic is approached by theoretical analysis and conceptual development. The paper reviews IIC literature and argues for a rational study ICC in the context of global value chain. Next, the paper puts forward a two‐dimensional governance model and five typical governance systems of the industries of developing countries. Examples of typical governance system are given based the practice of Chinese industries, such as appeal, rare earths, automotive, etc.

Findings

This paper constructs an industrial two‐dimensional governance model of the developing countries in the context of global value chain based on the interaction between industry governance and market governance, and also presents five typical governance systems – free to market, public governance, industrial governance, joint governance and network governance. Different governance system reflects different roles of states and enterprises played in the global value chains and result in different IIC in the end.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation is based primarily on methodology. The two‐dimensional governance model provides target‐oriented guidance for foresting international competitiveness of different types of industries. Future studies should include more in‐depth case studies on different governance system.

Originality/value

The paper presents a framework of the industrial two‐dimensional governance model, which emphasizes the important role of both states and enterprise in the IIC in the context of global value chain.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Curtis Clements, John D. Neill and Paul Wertheim

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between the industry relatedness of directors’ multiple directorships and corporate governance effectiveness…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between the industry relatedness of directors’ multiple directorships and corporate governance effectiveness. The authors posit that a director gains “beneficial experience” by serving on outside boards of companies in related industries, with a resulting increase in governance effectiveness. Conversely, they predict a decrease in governance effectiveness when directors serve on outside boards of companies in unrelated industries.

Design/methodology/approach

Using publicly available data, a Tobit regression model is used to examine the effect of the industry relatedness of board members’ multiple directorships on corporate governance effectiveness.

Findings

The results demonstrate a significant positive correlation between the industry relatedness of directors’ multiple directorships and corporate governance effectiveness. It was found that this industry relatedness effect is stronger for directors of small companies than large company directors. The paper also documents a significant negative effect on governance effectiveness for small firms whose directors increase their board service on non-industry-related boards.

Originality/value

Prior research has examined the “Busyness Hypothesis” and the “Experience Hypothesis” as mutually exclusive hypotheses. This paper extends prior research by examining the possibility that the two hypotheses are not competing, but rather that both an experience effect and a busyness effect may be present for directors serving on multiple boards, and that one of the effects will dominate the other, based on certain company-specific characteristics.

Details

Corporate Governance, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Jerry Sun and Guoping Liu

The purpose of this study is to investigate the interaction effect of auditor industry specialization and board governance on earnings management. This study examines…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the interaction effect of auditor industry specialization and board governance on earnings management. This study examines whether board independence is more or less effective in constraining earnings management for firms audited by industry specialists than for firms audited by non‐specialists.

Design/methodology/approach

The US data were collected from the RiskMetrics Directors database and the Compustat database. Regression analysis was used to test the research proposition.

Findings

It was found that earnings management is more negatively associated with board independence for firms audited by industry specialists than for firms audited by non‐specialists, consistent with the notion that there is a complementary relationship between auditor industry specialization and board governance. The findings suggest a positive interaction effect of auditor industry specialization and board governance on accounting quality.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by documenting explicit evidence that high quality boards can be more effective through hiring industry specialist auditors. This study also suggests that it may be worth investigating the interaction effect among different corporate governance mechanisms on accounting quality.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2018

Larissa Statsenko, Alex Gorod and Vernon Ireland

The competitiveness of mining regions largely depends on the performance of the regional supply chains that provide services to mining companies. These local supply chains…

Abstract

Purpose

The competitiveness of mining regions largely depends on the performance of the regional supply chains that provide services to mining companies. These local supply chains are often highly intertwined and represent a regional supply network for the industry. Individual companies often use supply chain strategies that are sub-optimal to overall supply network performance. To effectively respond to an uncertain business environment, policy-makers and supply chain participants would benefit by a governance framework that would allow to incentivise the formation of supply networks structures enabling effective operations. The purpose of this paper is to offer an empirically grounded conceptual framework based on Complex Adaptive Systems (CASs) governance principles, which links network governance mechanisms with supply network structure and operational performance to incentivise the formation of adaptive and resilient supply networks in the mining industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method research design and a case study of the South Australian mining sector were used to collect empirical data. Qualitative interviews and network analysis of the SA mining industry regional supply network structure were conducted. The relationships between network parameters were interpreted using CAS theory.

Findings

An empirically grounded conceptual framework based on CAS governance principles is developed. The case study revealed that supply chain strategies and governance mechanisms in the SA mining industry have led to the formation of a hierarchical, scale-free structure with insufficient horizontal connectivity which limits the adaptability, responsiveness and resilience of the regional supply network.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are drawn from a single case study. This limits generalisability of the findings and the proposed framework.

Practical implications

The proposed framework draws the attention of the policy-makers and supply chain participants towards the need for utilising CAS governance principles to facilitate the formation of adaptive, responsive and resilient regional supply networks in the mining industry.

Originality value

The proposed conceptual framework is an attempt to parameterise the governance of the regional supply networks in the mining industry.

Details

Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5364

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Donald H. Schepers

The purpose of this paper is to examine the legitimacy of the Equator Principles as a form of private governance of the investment banking industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the legitimacy of the Equator Principles as a form of private governance of the investment banking industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The project finance industry is first described, followed by a consideration of the theories of private governance and legitimacy. The governance of project finance by the Equator Principles is then examined against the backdrop of private governance and legitimacy theory. Cases regarding project finance and the Equator Principles are discussed.

Findings

The moral legitimacy of the governance of the Equator Principles is highly questionable, a serious issue for private governance schemes. There are large gaps in the governance structure, and the processes and content of much of the Principles are left to each bank, with little mandated transparency or accountability, particularly at the level of individual deals.

Practical implications

The Equator Principles have legitimacy problems arising from their governance structure. These issues are examined at some length, and specific suggestions are offered for repairing certain of the flaws in the system.

Originality/value

Private governance is increasingly important in international arenas, attempting to enforce standards that individual governments often leave to the private sector. This paper examines the legitimacy and governance issues in one system, and makes recommendations to increase the value and structure of the Equator Principles.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Mary Jane Lenard, Karin A. Petruska, Pervaiz Alam and Bing Yu

The purpose of this paper is to compare the effect of corporate governance variables and fraud litigation on audit fees both before and after the implementation of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the effect of corporate governance variables and fraud litigation on audit fees both before and after the implementation of the Sarbanes‐Oxley (SOX) Act in 2002.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilizes a sample of firms that had litigation proceedings filed against them for fraudulent financial reporting, and compare these firms to a sample of non‐fraud firms in the pre‐and post‐SOX period. First, the authors examine indicators of audit fees using the Simunic model. Next, the authors develop a logistic regression model with corporate governance variables and other financial control variables in order to identify the characteristics of firms that are accused of fraud in the pre‐and post‐SOX period.

Findings

The paper identifies specific components of corporate governance that are positively related to audit fees and which subsequently aid in classifying companies subject to fraud litigation. The most successful logistic regression model for 2005 (post‐SOX) is 64.4 per cent accurate in distinguishing firms litigated for fraud, while the most successful model for 2001 (pre‐SOX) is 61.4 per cent accurate in distinguishing such firms.

Originality/value

The research design and findings assist in providing additional evidence about the association between the effectiveness of the corporate governance structure and the external auditor in assessing the risk of fraud.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Rupika Khanna and Chandan Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of infrastructure and governance quality on the state-level productivity of Indian manufacturing for the period 2008–2011.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of infrastructure and governance quality on the state-level productivity of Indian manufacturing for the period 2008–2011.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first rank Indian states on their quality of governance using benefit-of-the-doubt approach. Next, to explain state-level differences in total factor productivity (TFP), the authors assess the impact of a composite index of governance on industrial TFP of Indian states using alternate techniques and controlling for endogeneity. The authors also decompose the composite effect of governance in terms of economic, social and financial infrastructure and other key governance dimensions, which serves as another robustness check for the findings.

Findings

The authors find that TFP varies significantly across states, so does governance quality. Further, results suggest that TFP of Indian industries is sensitive toward public service deliveries of economic, social and financial infrastructure. However, the authors fail to find any impact of law and order indicators, for instance, rate of violent crimes, police strength and judicial service quality on the manufacturing productivity. The estimated coefficient of governance index is robust across alternate methodologies.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to assess the impact of regional governance factors on the manufacturing sector of India. The study has identified governance factors that impact manufacturing productivity in the Indian states. Findings suggest that an effective way to eliminate regional growth inequality in India is to ensure that the lagging states initiate reforms to improve the quality of institutions, regulation and governance. Findings of the study contribute to the limited literature on governance at the regional/sub-national level.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Marlene M. Hohn and Christian F. Durach

Focusing on the apparel industry, this study extends current knowledge on how additive manufacturing (AM) may impact global supply chains regarding structures of…

Abstract

Purpose

Focusing on the apparel industry, this study extends current knowledge on how additive manufacturing (AM) may impact global supply chains regarding structures of interorganizational governance and the industry's social-sustainability issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an exploratory research design, two consecutive Delphi studies, with three survey rounds each, were conducted to carve out future industry scenarios and assess AM's impact on supply chain governance and social sustainability.

Findings

The implementation of AM is posited to reinforce existing supply chain governance structures that are dominated by powerful apparel retailers. Retailers are expected to use the increased production speed and heightened market competition to enforce faster fashion cycles and lower purchasing prices, providing a grim outlook for future working conditions at the production stage.

Social implications

Against the common narrative that technological progress increases societal well-being, this study finds that new digital technologies may, in fact, amplify rather than improve existing social-sustainability issues in contemporary production systems.

Originality/value

This article contributes to the nascent research field of AM's supply chain impact as one of the first empirical studies to analyze how AM introduction may impact on interorganizational governance while specifically addressing potential social-sustainability implications. The developed propositions relate to and extend the resource dependence and stakeholder perspectives on governance and social sustainability in supply chains. For managers, our results enrich the discussion about the potential use of AM beyond operational viability to include considerations on the wider implications for supply chains and the prevailing working conditions within them.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Leonardo Marques, Paulo Lontra, Peter Wanke and Jorge Junio Moreira Antunes

This study analyzes whether power in the supply chain, based on governance modes and network centrality, explain financial performance at different levels of analysis…

Abstract

Purpose

This study analyzes whether power in the supply chain, based on governance modes and network centrality, explain financial performance at different levels of analysis: buyers, suppliers and dyads.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a dual macro-micro lens based on global value chain (i.e. market, modular, relational and captive governance modes) and social network analysis (network centrality) to assess the impact of power (im)balance onto financial performance. Different from previous research, this study adopts information reliability techniques – such as information entropy – to differentiate the weights of distinct financial performance metrics in terms of the maximal entropy principle. This principle states that the probability distribution that best represents the current state of knowledge given prior data is the one with largest entropy. These weights are used in TOPSIS analysis.

Findings

Results offer insightful reflections to SCM research. We show that buyers outperform suppliers due to power asymmetry. We ground our findings both analyzing across governance modes and comparing network centrality. We show that market and modular governances (where power balance prevails) outperform relational and captive modes at the dyadic level – thus inferring that in the long run these governance modes may lead to financially healthier supply chains.

Originality/value

This study advances SCM research by exploring the impact of governance modes and network centrality on performance at both firm and dyadic levels while employing an innovative combination of secondary data and robust set of techniques including TOPSIS, WASPAS and information entropy.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Federica Rossi

The aim of this article is to contribute to the debate on university‐industry knowledge transfer and on the changing organization of knowledge creation activities.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to contribute to the debate on university‐industry knowledge transfer and on the changing organization of knowledge creation activities.

Design/methodology/approach

By integrating several strands of analysis, a conceptual framework is developed that associates several properties of knowledge and of the institutional context in which university‐industry relationships take place, to the knowledge transfer governance forms that are most likely to be adopted. The framework is shown to be in accordance with results from the empirical literature, and is validated using an original dataset.

Findings

The data analysis confirms that the choice of university‐industry knowledge transfer governance forms on the part of organizations involved in knowledge production and dissemination projects is related to the key dimensions in the conceptual framework.

Originality/value

The conceptual framework developed in this article allows the incentives that drive the choice of specific governance forms for university‐industry interactions to be explained, as well as the processes and rationales that underpin the changing nature of university‐industry relationships to be explained.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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