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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Saku J. Mäkinen and Ozgur Dedehayir

There is a growing need for measures assessing technological changes in systemic contexts as business ecosystems replace standalone products. In these ecosystem contexts…

Abstract

There is a growing need for measures assessing technological changes in systemic contexts as business ecosystems replace standalone products. In these ecosystem contexts, organizations are required to manage their innovation processes in increasingly networked and complex environments. In this paper, we introduce the technology and ecosystem clockspeed measures that can be used to assess the temporal nature of technological changes in a business ecosystem. We analyze systemic changes in the personal computer (PC) ecosystem, explicitly focusing on subindustries central to the delivery of PC gaming value to the end user. Our results show that the time-based intensity of technological competition in intertwined subindustries of a business ecosystem may follow various trajectories during the evolution of the ecosystem. Hence, the technology and ecosystem clockspeed measures are able to pinpoint alternating dynamics in technological changes among the subindustries in the business ecosystem. We subsequently discuss organizational considerations and theoretical implications of the proposed measures.

Details

Collaboration and Competition in Business Ecosystems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-826-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Nischal Thapa and Puspa Shah

This study aims to identify and examine the antecedents of attitude toward entrepreneurial behaviors (ATEB) of firms. Additionally, this study also identifies and examines…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify and examine the antecedents of attitude toward entrepreneurial behaviors (ATEB) of firms. Additionally, this study also identifies and examines the antecedents of innovativeness and proactiveness. Furthermore, this study explains how factors within and outside the organization affect ATEB, innovativeness and proactiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the attention-based view (ABV) and examines the effects of long-term focus and industry clockspeed on attitude toward firms’ entrepreneurial behaviors (EB). This study measures ATEB by analyzing the top management team’s words in the earnings conference calls. It applies the two-stage least squares regression with fixed effects and instrumental variables to conduct the empirical analysis.

Findings

The results indicate that the direct effects of long-term focus and industry clockspeed on ATEB are not significant. However, the moderating effect of industry clockspeed on the relationship between long-term focus and EB is significant and positive. The results indicate that firms that are operating in fast clockspeed industries exhibiting long-term focus exhibit EB. Furthermore, the results also indicate that long-term focus and industry clockspeed collectively affect innovativeness and proactiveness.

Practical implications

This research helps firms to develop entrepreneurial behavior operating under various task environment conditions.

Originality/value

This study applies the ABV of the firm and contributes to the area of firm-level EB, while prior studies have not implemented this perspective in investigating firm-level EB. Past studies have not applied the ABV of the firm to study EB, innovativeness and proactiveness either independently or collectively.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2007

Bert Meijboom, Hans Voordijk and Henk Akkermans

The relevance of “industry clockspeed” to supply chain co‐ordination (SCC) has recently been stressed but hardly been researched. Taking an information‐processing…

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Abstract

Purpose

The relevance of “industry clockspeed” to supply chain co‐ordination (SCC) has recently been stressed but hardly been researched. Taking an information‐processing perspective, the purpose of this paper is to examine the development of SCC theory under varying clockspeed circumstances.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory research project investigated four Dutch multinational firms operating in industries with different “clockspeeds”.

Findings

The main findings of this exploratory research suggest that, with increasing clockspeed, the use of inventory as a means of providing slack against uncertainty decreases, whereas the use of lateral relations increases. Remarkably, the role of outsourcing is substantial in both low‐ and high‐clockspeed settings, but limited in the intermediate group. Opposite to this, the role of vertical information systems is limited in low‐ and in high‐clockspeed industries, but substantial in medium‐clockspeed firms. These findings are consistent with the basic theory of organisational life‐cycle patterns.

Research limitations/implications

More data should be collected and analysed in subsequent research, e.g. data relating to more companies, investigated over longer periods of time, paying attention to multiple dimensions such as company age and size. Organisational solutions that may deal with accelerating industry clockspeeds are platform‐based product development, time and form postponement, and modular production networks.

Practical implications

Supply chain managers should be wary of one‐size‐fits‐all solutions irrespective of current industry settings or company maturity stage.

Originality/value

Previous research argues that the shorter the life cycles of the products that firms sell, the more rapidly they have to invent not just new products, but new ways of organising as well. This study is a follow‐up to this work with a focus on the co‐ordination within a supply chain in response to varying levels of industry clockspeed, an issue hardly considered in earlier work.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Aruana Rosa Souza-Luz and Iuri Gavronski

Conventional wisdom posits that firms in slow clockspeed industries usually favor exploitation over exploration, prioritizing the need to increase efficiency, reduce costs…

Abstract

Purpose

Conventional wisdom posits that firms in slow clockspeed industries usually favor exploitation over exploration, prioritizing the need to increase efficiency, reduce costs and invest in process improvements. However, what happens when such firms face structural changes in the long run? The authors claim that even firms in slow clockspeed industries should be ambidextrous, that is, they should develop both exploration and exploitation capabilities. Supply chain (SC) managers are key players in enabling organizational ambidexterity. This paper aims to identify the abilities that characterize the ambidextrous SC managers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data from an in-depth case study through ethnographic research, non-participant observation and interviews with SC managers at a Brazilian chemical firm embedded in a slow clockspeed network of clients. These longitudinal data were used to demonstrate the process of implementing new projects in an SC department.

Findings

The authors propose a set of key abilities that enable ambidexterity in SC managers for them to contribute effectively to the SC exploration and exploitation practices: a holistic yet focused view; prior experience in multiple functional areas; technical knowledge; openness towards network connectivity; openness to sharing ideas with other managers; empathy; and entrepreneurial capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

This paper contributes to the SCM ambidexterity literature by bringing to light the abilities of successful ambidextrous SC managers. The seven abilities identified are discussed. The authors formulate theoretical propositions on how these abilities enable SC managers’ ambidexterity.

Practical implications

This study provides SC managers with the knowledge of a set of individual abilities they should develop among their SC personnel to offer a more suitable environment in their departments for ambidexterity to take place. In addition, these abilities can be used as screening criteria in personnel selection processes to increase the proportion of ambidextrous employees within the firm. The identified characteristics could also be used as recruitment criteria for managerial positions in SCM.

Originality/value

This research advances SC literature by studying SC managers through the lens of the organizational ambidexterity literature. Using a combination of case study, non-participant observation and ethnographic research, the authors derive a set of propositions for the characteristics of ambidextrous SC managers.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Robert K. Perrons and Ken Platts

To determine whether or not clockspeed is an important variable in outsourcing strategies throughout the development of radical innovations.

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Abstract

Purpose

To determine whether or not clockspeed is an important variable in outsourcing strategies throughout the development of radical innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

An internet‐based survey of manufacturing firms from all over the world.

Findings

An industry's clockspeed does not play a significant role in the success or failure of a particular outsourcing strategy for a radical innovation.

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions from earlier research in this area are not necessarily industry‐specific.

Practical implications

Lessons learned via previous investigations about the computer industry need not be confined to that sector. Vertical integration may be a more robust outsourcing strategy when developing a radical innovation in industries of all clockspeeds.

Originality/value

Previous research efforts in this field focused on a single technology jump, but this approach may have overlooked a potentially important variable: industry clockspeed. Thus, this investigation explores whether clockspeed is an important factor.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Tor Guimaraes

The literature prescribing important determinants of innovation success is grouped into four main areas encompassing strategic leadership, competitive intelligence…

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Abstract

Purpose

The literature prescribing important determinants of innovation success is grouped into four main areas encompassing strategic leadership, competitive intelligence, management of technology, and specific characteristics of the company's innovation process. Further, industry clockspeed has been considered to be a possible moderator for these determinants of innovation success. While these major areas of study may indeed be important to enhance company innovation and competitiveness, the existing literature on each area is not being shared by researchers in the other areas. That has led until now to the study of models relatively narrow in scope and primarily focused on the particular research area. This study aims to test these constructs as a set of determinants of innovation success and the possible moderating effect of industry clockspeed.

Design/methodology/approach

A field test using a mailed questionnaire to collect a relatively large sample has been used to test the proposed model. To eliminate possible multicollinearity among the independent variables, a multivariate regression analysis was used.

Findings

The results provide clear evidence about the importance of industry clockspeed as a moderator of the relationships between strategic leadership, competitive intelligence, management of technology, and specific characteristics of the company's innovation process with company success in business innovation. Also, the company's change process as defined here is equally important to low and high clockspeed industries for successfully implementing business innovations.

Research limitation/implications

Despite the relatively broad scope of the proposed model, other factors may also be important and should be included in future studies.

Practical implications

The items used for measuring the main constructs provide further and more specific insights into how managers should go about developing these areas within their organizations.

Originality/value

While the study is grounded in the literature of what until now have been four separate areas of knowledge, it proposed an integrated model for these areas important to business innovation, and empirically tested the model.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Robert K. Perrons, Matthew G. Richards and Ken Platts

The purpose of this investigation is to help establish: whether or not strong relationships between suppliers and customers improve performance; and if prescriptive…

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Abstract

Purpose of this paper

The purpose of this investigation is to help establish: whether or not strong relationships between suppliers and customers improve performance; and if prescriptive frameworks on outsourcing radical innovations are dependent on industry clockspeed.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of UK‐based manufacturers, followed by a statistical analysis.

Findings

Long‐term supplier links seem not to play a role in the development of radical innovations. Moreover, industry clockspeed has no significant bearing on the success or failure of any outsourcing strategy for radically new technologies.

Research limitations/implications

Literature about outsourcing in the face of radical innovation can be more confidently applied to industries of all clockspeeds.

Practical implications

Prescriptions for fast clockspeed industries should be applied more broadly: all industries should maintain a high degree of vertical integration in the early days of a radical innovation.

Originality/value

Prior papers had explored whether or not a company should outsource radical innovations, but none had determined if this is equally true for slow industries and fast ones. Therein lies the original contribution of this paper.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Roberto Chavez, Brian Fynes, Cristina Gimenez and Frank Wiengarten

The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of industry clockspeed on the relationship between supply chain management (SCM) practices, from both upstream and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of industry clockspeed on the relationship between supply chain management (SCM) practices, from both upstream and downstream sides of the supply chain, and SCM performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a questionnaire sent to manufacturing companies in the Republic of Ireland. The relationships between the constructs are analysed through regression analysis.

Findings

The results suggest that the relationship between SCM practices and SCM performance is not monotonic across varying levels of industry clockspeed. Although mixed support was found for the hypothesized relationships, this research contributes considerably to the theoretical development of the contingency view in the SCM literature.

Practical implications

Managers should be aware that the rate of change in their industries can affect the way SCM practices across the supply chain impact on SCM performance.

Originality/value

The literature review has shown that empirical studies which address the relationship between SCM practices and SCM performance provide mixed results. One possible explanation lies in the contingency theory. This paper contributes to the theoretical development of the contingency view in the SCM literature by showing that industry clockspeed affects the way SCM practices impact on SCM performance.

Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Roberto Chavez, Cristina Gimenez, Brian Fynes, Frank Wiengarten and Wantao Yu

The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of internal lean practices on multiple operational performance dimensions, and assess the contingency perspective of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of internal lean practices on multiple operational performance dimensions, and assess the contingency perspective of these relationships with respect to industry clockspeed.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on empirical data gathered from 228 manufacturing companies in the Republic of Ireland. The relationships between the constructs are analyzed through regression analysis.

Findings

The results indicate that the relationships between internal lean practices and quality, delivery, flexibility and cost were found to be positive and significant. Further, industry clockspeed was found to moderate the relationship between internal lean practices and quality, delivery and flexibility, but not cost.

Practical implications

While internal lean practices can improve operational performance, managers should be aware that internal lean practices are not universally applicable, and the rate of change within an industry should be considered at the time of implementing lean principles.

Originality/value

Much of the lean literature tends to be biased towards its effectiveness. However, empirical evidence shows that not all lean implementation have led to positive results, which has been attributed to the general complexity in the relationship between internal lean practices and performance. We propose to investigate further this relationship by disaggregating operational performance into four of its dimensions, namely quality, delivery, flexibility and cost, and by investigating the possible contingency effect of industry clockspeed.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Robert K. Perrons and Ken Platts

Some research in the area of make‐buy decisions for new technologies suggests that it is a good idea for a company to pursue a fairly rigorous “make” policy in the early…

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Abstract

Some research in the area of make‐buy decisions for new technologies suggests that it is a good idea for a company to pursue a fairly rigorous “make” policy in the early days of a potentially disruptive innovation. Other studies prescribe exactly the opposite, promoting instead a “buy” strategy. Drawing from observations and lessons from the Prisoner's Dilemma, this paper seeks to bridge the gap between these perspectives by suggesting that both strategies are valid, but that they are most successfully applied in different market environments. The “make” prescription may be more suited to either extremely fast or extremely slow rates of technological change, while a “buy” strategy might be more appropriate in market sectors where technologies evolve at a medium pace. This paper highlights the importance of industry clockspeed and supplier relationships in make‐buy decisions for new technologies, and puts forward two new hypotheses that require empirical testing.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 104 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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