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Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2005

F. Xavier Molina-Morales and M. Teresa Martínez-Fernández

This paper draws upon the idea that an organisation can be understood as an open system embedded in a larger social system. We propose that geographical proximity is a key…

Abstract

This paper draws upon the idea that an organisation can be understood as an open system embedded in a larger social system. We propose that geographical proximity is a key determinant of the porous boundaries of organisations. Proximity produces repeated, trusting and long-term perspective relationships. Consequently, clustered firms (i.e. in an industrial district) develop relevant relations and interactions within this social system. Firms acquire new resources and capabilities using external endowments. In an industrial district, firms benefit from a common reputation, from an intense exchange and combination of resources, and the presence of different local institutions. As a result, firms in the industrial district may improve innovation and net-value creation capacities, which explain the competitive superiority of these firms. Our study draws on an empirical study involving a sample of 350 Spanish industrial firms in which we compared district and non-district member firms. Findings suggest relevant conclusions with respect to our theoretical propositions.

Details

Competence Perspectives on Resources, Stakeholders and Renewal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-170-5

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2019

Enrique Claver-Cortés, Bartolomé Marco-Lajara, Pedro Seva-Larrosa and Lorena Ruiz-Fernández

This paper aims to know the dimension and scope that research on the district effect has had in the literature about industrial districts, as well as to shed some light on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to know the dimension and scope that research on the district effect has had in the literature about industrial districts, as well as to shed some light on the connection between industrial districts and business results; or expressed differently, on how being located in an industrial district or not affects or might influence the performance of the firms located therein.

Design/methodology/approach

The purpose of this paper has been achieved through an exhaustive review of the empirical literature dedicated to the so-called district effect. The papers selected in the analysis were selected on the basis of the following criteria: (1) publications in scientific journals; (2) studies carried out in Spain and Italy; and (3) works published between 1994 and 2017.

Findings

The outcome of the literature review suggests, on the one hand, that the debate on the extent to which the territory influences the competitiveness of firms located in industrial districts still remains a topic of great interest. It can additionally be observed that most of the works dedicated to measuring the district effect have done so using three dimensions: (1) productivity/efficiency; (2) international competitiveness; and (3) innovation.

Practical implications

From a theoretical perspective, the findings of this paper make it possible to carry out an integrating proposal for the measurement of the district effect which revolves around three dimensions (productivity/efficiency; international competitiveness; and innovation).

Originality/value

This paper makes a twofold contribution to the literature: (i) it brings together the most important empirical contributions that measure the competitive advantages obtained by firms located in industrial districts through the district effect; and (ii) it theoretically and empirically establishes the essential dimensions of that effect.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal , vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Antonella Meneghetti and Damiana Chinese

The possible evolution of facility management (FM) in industrial districts, which characterise Italian industrial system, is analysed. The paper investigates structural…

Abstract

The possible evolution of facility management (FM) in industrial districts, which characterise Italian industrial system, is analysed. The paper investigates structural features of industrial districts, mainly formed by small sized enterprises, and how they influence the attributes of the FM market. An aggregation matrix is introduced to identify technical opportunities such as replicated, centralised and distributed facilities and management for industrial districts. A positioning matrix for a district‐oriented FM is proposed, allowing FM providers to seize technical opportunities and to reap economies of scale and scope. Requisites and obstacles to the evolution of potential FM providers towards more competitive positions are outlined. The role of co‐operation with and among potential clients, in particular, together with information, is clarified. Considering the client’s perspective, the paper describes the forms of competitive advantage that can be gained through a district‐oriented FM by single enterprises and by an industrial district as a whole.

Details

Facilities, vol. 20 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2011

Valmir Emil Hoffmann, F. Xavier Molina‐Morales and M. Teresa Martínez‐Fernández

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the competitiveness of the Brazilian ceramic tile industry using a conceptual model that the authors developed which integrates…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the competitiveness of the Brazilian ceramic tile industry using a conceptual model that the authors developed which integrates two contemporary approaches: industrial districts and the resource‐based view.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study was carried out, using a survey with firm CEOs.

Findings

The results indicate that companies present in industrial districts have greater access to the strategic resources they share, such as knowledge transfer, access to information, and collective reputation. This fact results in higher levels of competitiveness, from the resource‐based view, since companies outside the district do not have the same resources available to them.

Research limitations/implications

Idiosyncratic characteristics of the industry can limit our results. For further discussion, we suggest studies with other industries and local players and the positive effect of the social capital.

Originality/value

One contribution from our work is linking the resource‐based view to industrial district dynamics, which can help to develop local industrial policies.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Matilde Milanesi, Simone Guercini and Alexandra Waluszewski

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the changes of the Italian textile district of Prato, considered an exemplary case of the industrial district (ID) model, using a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the changes of the Italian textile district of Prato, considered an exemplary case of the industrial district (ID) model, using a business network perspective. The “Black Swan” metaphor is used to address the changes in the Prato textile district in order to understand whether such changes have been an unexpected and unpredictable phenomenon, or they can be explain with a different theoretical tool-box, namely, that developed by the industrial network approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilizes already published studies on the changes of the textile/fashion companies located to the Prato area. Both studies that have been carried out within an ID approach and those carried out with an Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) point of departure are considered in the research. Both types of studies were utilized to identify empirical observed changes of the producer, respectively user setting that the Prato located companies was related to, including identification of changes affecting both the local setting and the larger network it was related to.

Findings

The utilization of the IMP model proposes a learning ground that exceed the local context and open ups of investigations of opportunities and threats stemming from interactions across spatial borders. Analysed from an interactive point of view, in the specific context of Prato, the exploitation of the opportunities given by establishing relationship between natives and migrants actors goes through the creation of interactions among actors representing specific resource combinations and activity structures – within and outside the local community.

Originality/value

The paper concerns how the same research object – the changes of the Prato district – appears from another perspective different from the ID theory, namely, the industrial network approach developed by scholars of the IMP Group.

Details

IMP Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-1403

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

Roberto Grandinetti

With the advance of globalization the competitive chances of industrial districts depends increasingly on their ability to connect to the cognitive circuits of the global…

Abstract

Purpose

With the advance of globalization the competitive chances of industrial districts depends increasingly on their ability to connect to the cognitive circuits of the global economy. This challenge demands the presence of local actors capable of acting as cognitive interfaces between the district context and the global environment. The paper focuses on a specific category of local/global cognitive interfaces, i.e. the institutions that provide knowledge‐intensive business services (KIBS). The purpose is to explain how institutional KIBS play this role.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a detailed analysis of the case of such an institution operating in the chair‐manufacturing district of North‐East Italy. Based on this case study, a model is proposed for interpreting the role of a local/global cognitive interface that institutional KIBS are able to perform.

Findings

The first part of the framework shows the cognitive processes hosted by this type of institution and the connection between such processes and the KIBS's stock of knowledge. The second part of the model considers the interdependent core capabilities that enable a KIBS to act effectively as a local/global cognitive interface.

Originality/value

The role that institutions, acting as KIBS, can play in promoting the survival of industrial districts has been discussed in some studies but no model has been proposed as yet to explain how these institutions can play such an important part. The paper aims to begin to fill this gap.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Ilan Bijaoui, Suhail Sultan and Shlomo Yedidia Tarba

The main purpose of this paper is to propose a model of economic development able to generate a cross‐border sustainable economic development, in regions in conflict. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this paper is to propose a model of economic development able to generate a cross‐border sustainable economic development, in regions in conflict. The Italian industrial district model implements a community industry synergy process led by the authorities according to a top‐down approach. The cluster model implements a clustering specialization process led, in the American version, by a bottom‐up approach and in the European version by a top‐down approach. The regional innovation system (RIS) provides the regional and international innovation networking required for both models in order to confront the global competition. The proposed progressive model creates the industrial specialization (industrial district) required for the development of the clustering process supported by the RIS.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have selected, from the list of producers (growers and producers of olive oil), a random sample of 103 growers of olives and producers of olive oil from both groups from the Northern regions (Galilee in Israel and the Northern West Bank): 26 Palestinian growers, 25 Palestinian producers, 13 Israeli growers and 39 Israeli producers of olive oil, and interviewed them.

Findings

The results show that the community‐industry synergy of the industrial district model is supported by the economic actors from both sides of the border but refused for political reasons by the regional authorities and professional associations. The raw material (olives), the human capital and the knowledge required in order to start the clustering process exist.

Practical implications

The study has evaluated the Israeli‐Jewish and Arab and the Palestinian olive sector, and clearly indicates that bottom‐up decision‐making process is the only way for the moment for initiating the cluster and RIS models in the olive sector. The intervention of a third party is required in order to start the bottom‐up implementation of the industrial district model and launch the clustering process.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper lies in organizing the industrial district in such a way that it will generate a cluster in the long run. Thus, it is called progressive model.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Francisco Puig, Helena Marques and Pervez N. Ghauri

This paper aims to analyse the impact of globalization on the manufacturing operations of industries and industrial districts and how it influences the specialization and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the impact of globalization on the manufacturing operations of industries and industrial districts and how it influences the specialization and diversification of manufacturing decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample includes 9,684 Spanish manufacturing textile firms and the analysis is both cross‐sectional and longitudinal.

Findings

The results show that globalization tends to diminish the district and subsector effects over time, but they also show the positive impact of specialization on productivity and of diversification on business growth.

Originality/value

The paper indicates to managers that the production function in textile firms has viability in Europe through achieving specialization and efficient operations management.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2013

Giovanna Testa

The objective of the current study is to map the Val d'Agri district relationships, defining the way firms relate along the district value production chain with reference

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of the current study is to map the Val d'Agri district relationships, defining the way firms relate along the district value production chain with reference to both their position and “contractual power”, and to understand how the firms' positions in the value chain affect knowledge transfer (KT) processes in the district. Considering the “hub and spoke” morphology, the author argues that KT is deeply affected by both the firms' contractual power and their positions within the district. Explicit KT is mainly linked to development of production processes; in contrast, tacit KT depends primarily on the actions of people working in the district. Human capital plays an important role in transferring knowledge through imitation, work mobility and social interaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt an empirical approach in which they describe and analyse the principle characteristics of the Val d'Agri relational structure, with identification of the main issues that impact the KT development process. The study consists of two parts: first is an analysis of the main national and international literature on knowledge transfer, industrial districts and oilfield environments, from economic and managerial perspectives; second is the empirical study to specifically describe and analyse the way KT occurs within the vertical relationships typical of a hub‐and‐spoke district.

Findings

For the ID typology under observation, the hub and spoke theory provides better fit than the Marshallian district model.

Practical implications

Mapping the specific characteristics of this oilfield industrial district indicates that such characteristics are closely dependent on the character of the actual resources and on national laws and regulations that govern oil exploitation in Italy, creating positions of power within the production chain that determine the relationship between the companies.

Originality/value

Noting the importance of industrial districts and of KT in general competition among firms, the paper provides a useful framework to understand both industrial district dynamics and the ways KT can be promoted among all the firms that are related along a given value chain.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Reflections and Extensions on Key Papers of the First Twenty-Five Years of Advances
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-435-0

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