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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1971

An Act to amend the law relating to employers and workers and to organisations of employers and organisations of workers; to provide for the establishment of a National…

Abstract

An Act to amend the law relating to employers and workers and to organisations of employers and organisations of workers; to provide for the establishment of a National Industrial Relations Court and for extending the jurisdiction of industrial tribunals; to provide for the appointment of a Chief Registrar of Trade Unions and Employers' Associations, and of assistant registrars, and for establishing a Commission on Industrial Relations as a statutory body; and for purposes connected with those matters. [5th August 1971]

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Managerial Law, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

Denning, L.J. Buckley and L.J. Roskill

June 13,1972 Industrial Relations — Unregistered trade union — Unpaid shop stewards elected by fellow members with union authority to negotiate at local level with dock…

Abstract

June 13,1972 Industrial Relations — Unregistered trade union — Unpaid shop stewards elected by fellow members with union authority to negotiate at local level with dock employers — Shop stewards initiating campaign of blacking container lorries after blacking by unregistered union knowingly inducing breaches of contract made “unfair industrial practice” by statute — Industrial Court orders to union to stop specified blacking — Union advice to shop stewards to obey court orders rejected — Court finding union in contempt and liable to fines and to compensate complainants for unfair industrial practices — Shop stewards agents, not servants of union — Whether evidence of implied authority from union to agents to black — Union not responsible for conduct of shop stewards acting outside scope of express or implied authority — Industrial Relations Act, 1971 (c.72) ss. 96(1), 101,167(1) (9).

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Managerial Law, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2021

Obed Kambasu

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the rising waves of workplace militancy in the public sector and to provide insights into the perceptions that frame…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the rising waves of workplace militancy in the public sector and to provide insights into the perceptions that frame justification for industrial action among Ugandan public sector employees.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews and documentary analysis, analysed qualitatively, as well as a review of theoretical and empirical literature.

Findings

Public school teachers and public university lecturers in Uganda who frequently engage in industrial action mainly rationalise their engagement by the absence, or the ineffectiveness of alternative conflict resolution mechanisms. The findings also show that industrial action, even in resource-constrained settings like Uganda, is stimulated more by the desire to achieve equity rather than by the basic desire to improve working conditions. It is also notable that new, often unstructured, forms of workplace militancy continue to emerge in the public sector, and waves of industrial action are shifting from the industrial to the public sector.

Practical implications

Whereas industrial action is a protected labour right, the findings of this research strongly suggest that public employees do not necessarily enjoy their right to engage, but only reluctantly take industrial action as a “last resort”. The findings will, therefore, help public managers and policymakers to appreciate their responsibility in reducing the compulsion for industrial action among public employees.

Originality/value

This paper provides a general explanation for industrial action from the perspective of the people involved, rather than explaining the causality of specific strike actions. At a time when industrial action is generally declining in the developed industrialised states, this paper sheds light on the rise in collective action in developing countries and especially in the public sector.

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Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

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Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

J.R. Carby‐Hall

Civil wrongdoings with consequent financial and other loss or damage to employers, employees and third parties may result in the course of various trade union activities…

Abstract

Civil wrongdoings with consequent financial and other loss or damage to employers, employees and third parties may result in the course of various trade union activities. These day to day trade union activities take a variety of forms. The most common ones are inducement of breach of contract, conspiracy, trespass, nuisance, and intimidation. Each of these activities constitutes a tort which, unless the statutory immunities apply, would normally give rise at common law to an action for damages or, as is more frequent, enable the aggrieved party to obtain an injunction.

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Managerial Law, vol. 29 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Jo Carby‐Hall

In the last monograph an attempt was made at giving a short historical background of the trade union movement; at defining a trade union; at discussing the closed shop and…

Abstract

In the last monograph an attempt was made at giving a short historical background of the trade union movement; at defining a trade union; at discussing the closed shop and at looking towards its future.

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Managerial Law, vol. 32 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1972

M.R. Denning, L.J. Buckley and L.J. Roskill

May 19, 1972 Industrial Relations — Industrial dispute — Emergency provisions — “Irregular industrial action” — Work to rule on railways — “Concerted course of conduct …

Abstract

May 19, 1972 Industrial Relations — Industrial dispute — Emergency provisions — “Irregular industrial action” — Work to rule on railways — “Concerted course of conduct … by a group of workers” — Whether in “breach of their contracts of employment” — Industrial Relations Act, 1971 (c.72), ss. 33(4), 138(1) (2), 139(1) (4), 141(1) (2), 142(1), 143(1) (2). Master and Servant — Contract of service — Effect of railway work to rule disrupting services — Whether in breach of contract — Industrial Relations Act, 1971, s. 33(4).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Jo Carby‐Hall

The Employment Act 1990 is the sixth piece of major industrial relations and trade union legislation brought in by the Tory government since 1979. Each of this legislation…

Abstract

The Employment Act 1990 is the sixth piece of major industrial relations and trade union legislation brought in by the Tory government since 1979. Each of this legislation continues the step by step reforms which, — in the belief of this goverment, — are needed to counteract the adverse effects on the economic performance and efficiency of this country. The political aims of this legislation are also obvious; they weaken trade unionism. In two Green Papers, namely “Removing barriers to employment” and “Unofficial action and the law” the government identified a number of “weaknesses” and “evils” in the industrial relations and trade union system; which are now dealt with by the 1990 Act.

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Managerial Law, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1981

Jo Carby‐Hall

Talking of newspapers Charles Prestwick Scott said “At the peril of its soul it must see that the supply is not tainted. Neither in what it gives, nor in what it does not…

Abstract

Talking of newspapers Charles Prestwick Scott said “At the peril of its soul it must see that the supply is not tainted. Neither in what it gives, nor in what it does not give, nor in the mode of presentation, must the unclouded face of truth suffer wrong. Comment is free but facts are sacred.” The aim of this monograph is to adhere as closely as is possible to Mr Scott's opinion. As far as the facts of the proposed legislation are concerned, these will of course be untainted; the commentary which follows from these facts however, being free, proposes to examine and analyse the untainted factual supply.

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Managerial Law, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

T. Sullivan, I. Christensen and D. Wan

The industrial unrest during January 1988 amongnurses in the UK National Health Service raisedthe matter of the attitude and behaviour of thatgroup of employees towards…

Abstract

The industrial unrest during January 1988 among nurses in the UK National Health Service raised the matter of the attitude and behaviour of that group of employees towards industrial action. In some circles that action is regarded as “unprofessional”. While the causes are shown to be complex, it is argued that they primarily involve two issues. First there was the threat of a fall in current pay levels and, secondly there was the view taken by those nurses that professional standards of nursing were falling. The nature of the dispute showed how professionalism and industrial action can be reconciled. This is done mainly by a “demonstration” rather than by a “stoppage”, while maintaining full cover of essential duties. A major aim of the action was to mobilise public and media opinion in favour of the nurses′ case.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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