Search results

1 – 10 of over 3000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 February 2008

Arto Saari and Tarja Takki

Numerous studies have shown that indoor environment affects health and performance, which in turn affect productivity. Property owners have not utilized Indoor Environment

Downloads
1035

Abstract

Purpose

Numerous studies have shown that indoor environment affects health and performance, which in turn affect productivity. Property owners have not utilized Indoor Environment Quality (IEQ) as a value‐added factor to market the office spaces. On the other hand, tenants have not had a tool to demand certain indoor conditions. The paper aims to present one market mechanism for including IEQ in office space supply: the office lease contract model entitled Indoor Environment Quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The research included a constructive search for a lease contract model for the problems presented above. The need for this novel lease model is proved by the financial calculations.

Findings

The lease contract procedure whereby a lessor issues a condition guarantee to a tenant consists of: technical building audit process; and entering the terms of the indoor condition guarantee in the lease contract. It makes sense for the owner to invest in a favourable indoor environment if the benefits are shared. An owner's monetary benefit from improved IEQ is also greatly related to longer lease periods. When tenants stay longer in the same facility there is less empty office space and less need for alterations by new tenants. Therefore, rental income is higher and alteration costs are lower, which in turn lead to higher profitability of the property owner's business.

Originality/value

The lease model proposed forms guidelines for taking account of the indoor air quality in lease contracts.

Details

Facilities, vol. 26 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Chuloh Jung, Jihad Awad, Naglaa Sami Abdelaziz Mahmoud and Muna Salameh

This study aims to evaluate The Springs’ indoor environment, one of the iconic townhouse-type residential buildings in Dubai, more efficiently for the integrated…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate The Springs’ indoor environment, one of the iconic townhouse-type residential buildings in Dubai, more efficiently for the integrated evaluation of the indoor environment with the weights of indoor environmental factors such as thermal, indoor air, lighting and acoustic.

Design/methodology/approach

The weights of the indoor environment factors were derived for the integrated evaluation to reflect the residents’ preferences. Based on the post-occupancy evaluation (P.O.E.) survey, the weights according to the gender, age group and indoor spaces followed a comparison and analytical processes.

Findings

This paper had found the priority of residents’ needs for each space in The Springs project. In summer, thermal comfort was the most important factor for living room and the master bedroom. In winter, the priority for living room and kitchen was the indoor air quality.

Research limitations/implications

As it is the first research survey for housing project in Dubai, it needs to be extended to other housing projects in Dubai. To increase the reliability of the weights calculated through this study and the applicability of the integrated indoor environmental evaluation, more in-depth P.O.E. survey is needed with wide range of survey participants.

Social implications

This paper will help developing guidelines for future renovation based on the comparative analysis among thermal comfort, acoustic comfort, lighting comfort and indoor air comfort.

Originality/value

This paper is the first attempt to analyze the condition of early housing projects in Dubai. The data can be used to increase not only the design quality and marketability of housing projects in Dubai but also the condition of residents’ health status to avoid sick building syndrome from approximately 20 years old buildings.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 September 2020

Mehmet Kadri Akyüz, Hasim Kafali and Onder Altuntas

This paper aims to measure the thermal comfort conditions and indoor air quality parameters, through on-site measurements taken in the areas mostly occupied by the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to measure the thermal comfort conditions and indoor air quality parameters, through on-site measurements taken in the areas mostly occupied by the passengers and airport staff. Terminal buildings consist of areas with various functions. Heating, ventilation and air conditioning requirements vary from area to area, thus leading to challenges in the management of indoor environment quality. Therefore, the study focuses on investigating the indoor environment conditions in various areas of the terminal buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the thermal comfort and indoor air quality were evaluated based on the parameters [CO2 concentration, relative humidity, temperature, predicted mean vote (PMV) and predicted percentage of dissatisfied (PPD)] collected for summer 2019 from different zones inside the International Dalaman Airport terminal building located in the southwest of Turkey. The measurements were performed in the areas mostly occupied by the airport staff and passengers (check-in area, security control areas, international departure lounge, domestic departure lounge and baggage claim hall).

Findings

As a result of the study, it was observed that the CO2 concentration was 480–965 ppm, the relative humidity was 51.9–75.8% and the temperature was in the range of 23.9°C–28.3°C inside the airport terminal. The PMV values were determined to be in the range of −0.23 to 0.67, and the PPD values 5–15%, which are used to measure the thermal comfort conditions.

Originality/value

There has been limited study on the determination of the indoor air quality in airport terminals and the investigation of the thermal comfort conditions. However, in this study, indoor air quality and thermal comfort conditions were determined by on-site measurements in the five mostly occupied areas by passengers and employees in the terminal building.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 93 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Edwin H.W. Chan, K.S. Lam and W.S. Wong

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the indoor environmental quality among residential buildings in dense urban living environment, after the outbreak of Severe Acute…

Downloads
1466

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the indoor environmental quality among residential buildings in dense urban living environment, after the outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), which called for a review on the relationship between health issues and the authors' built facilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Environmental tests include thermal comfort, noise, daylight and air quality inside the residence of typical housing units were carried out. Based on inferences drawn from test results, the paper developed systematic conclusions.

Findings

It was observed that most of the occupants (over 70 per cent of 125 households) were tolerating the higher air temperature and dimmer daylight inside their residence, which was proven to fall behind Hong Kong Standard. On the contrary, people reflected that they were also trying to abate noise and dust concentration in their daily life.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the flat occupants' exclusive property rights in law, there were limited access to the residents' flats and only 32 occupants out of 125 allowed us to conduct the survey. Yet, the data set was justified.

Practical implications

The results provides practical guidance for the design of future housing to enhance health and comfort of occupants.

Originality/value

Originality of the findings is based on on‐site data collected in dense urban housing condition. Rating data were also collected from the occupants concerned about their habituation conditions in Hong Kong after the outbreak of SARS, which was a major crisis that called for fundamental review of the authors' built facilities.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 September 2021

Ahmed Eweda, Abobakr Al-Sakkaf, Tarek Zayed and Sabah Alkass

The purpose of this study is to develop a condition assessment (CA) model for a building's indoor 21 environments and to improve the building's asset management process.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a condition assessment (CA) model for a building's indoor 21 environments and to improve the building's asset management process.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is based on dividing the building into spaces, which are the principal evaluated elements based on the building's indoor environmental quality (IEQ). An evaluation scheme was prepared for the identified factors and the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) technique was used to calculate the relative weight of each space inside the building as well as the contribution of each IEQ factors (IEQFs) in the overall environmental condition of each space inside the building. The multi-attribute utility theory (MAUT) was then applied to assess the environmental conditions of the building as a whole and its spaces. An educational building in Canada was evaluated using the developed model.

Findings

Each space type was found to have its own IEQFs weights, which confirms the hypothesis that the importance and allocation of each IEQF are dependent on the function and tasks carried out in each space. A similar indoor environmental assessment score was calculated using the developed model and the building CA conducted by the facility management team; “89%” was calculated, using K-mean clustering, for the physical and environmental conditions.

Originality/value

IEQ affects occupants' assessment of their quality of life (QOL). Despite the existence of IEQ evaluation models that correlate the building's IEQ and the occupants' perceived indoor assessments, some limitations have led to the necessity of developing a comprehensive model that integrates all factors and their sub-criteria in an assessment scheme that converts all the indoor environmental factors into objective metrics.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 August 2021

Aba Essanowa Afful, Joshua Ayarkwa, Godwin Kojo Kumi Acquah and Dickson Osei-Asibey

The aim of this study was to identify these enablers in literature and subsume them under broad categories for the development of a framework showing the…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to identify these enablers in literature and subsume them under broad categories for the development of a framework showing the interrelationships among the enablers.

Design/methodology/approach

Fifty-four (54) relevant articles were desk reviewed from different construction peer-reviewed journals and published conference proceedings to identify 20 core enablers of incorporating indoor environmental quality (IEQ) into building designs.

Findings

The identified enablers include improved occupants' health, well-being and satisfaction, environmental conservation, high return on investments and co-operative methods of design and construction management among others. To better understand the enablers identified, they were classified into seven main interconnected categories: economic enablers, environmental enablers, occupant and end-user enablers, process enablers, corporate image, culture and vision enablers, client-related enablers and external enablers.

Research limitations/implications

The interconnectedness brought to the fore a subtler appreciation of the drivers of IEQ, which could help expand current knowledge outside the narrow scope of isolated drivers. The fact that the papers selected in this study are not limited geographically underscores the wide applicability of the findings to the global construction industry.

Practical implications

Understanding that the enablers will enhance the adoption and design of quality indoor environments, help in building the capacity of consultants to adopt the design of quality IEs and reduce the impact of construction on the environment.

Social implications

These identified enablers are not limited geographically and thus could promote the design of quality indoor environments globally, particularly in green building design. To the global construction community, this review presents a list of enablers that would expedite the adoption of principles of IEQ designs in buildings thus taking the global construction industry one more step towards sustainable built forms. Promoting the identified enablers would ultimately steer stakeholders to design and build better indoor environments.

Originality/value

The fact that the papers selected in this study are not limited geographically underscores the wide applicability of the findings to the global construction industry.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 April 2014

Agnieszka Zalejska-Jonsson

The aims of this paper is to investigate the overall satisfaction of occupants of green and conventional residential buildings and their perception of indoor environment

Downloads
1721

Abstract

Purpose

The aims of this paper is to investigate the overall satisfaction of occupants of green and conventional residential buildings and their perception of indoor environment quality (IEQ) and to study factors that may cause occupants’ dissatisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a survey sent to occupants of comparable green and conventional multi-family buildings. The difference in responses between occupants of green and conventional buildings was analysed using Mann–Whitney (rank sum) test. The ordered logistic models were applied to the data to test whether the overall satisfaction changes depending on the level of acceptance of indoor environment quality and whether the building environmental profile and the apartment tenure affect occupant satisfaction.

Findings

The results show that both categories of occupants are very satisfied with their apartments and that there is no statistically significant difference between the stated overall satisfaction of occupants living in green and conventional buildings, although a difference was found in the acceptance level for thermal and sound quality. The research highlights the importance of occupant feedback, user-friendly technical installations and the ability to control indoor environment. This knowledge is important for designers, engineers and developers alike in enabling them to improve dwelling quality and minimize post-occupancy problems.

Research limitations/implications

It was not possible to include physical measurements of IEQ parameters; the analysis is based only on occupants’ responses, which may carry a certain subjectivity.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the understanding of IEQ from occupant perspective and to knowledge on green building performance.

Details

Facilities, vol. 32 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-618-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

R.A. Pitarma, J.E. Ramos, M.E. Ferreira and M.G. Carvalho

The improvement in the quality of life together with thermal comfort, air quality, health, workplace security and energy conservation measures justify the integral…

Abstract

The improvement in the quality of life together with thermal comfort, air quality, health, workplace security and energy conservation measures justify the integral education of environmental (outdoor and/or indoor) phenomena. Environmental education, through the appropriate tool, can play an important and vital role in this domain. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is the analysis of systems involving fluid flow, heat transfer and associated phenomena such as distribution of pollutants by means of computer‐based simulation. This technique, allowing the simulation and the visualization of environmental problems, represents a powerful tool to motivate, guide and educate on the environment. The main objective of this paper is to introduce this new advanced active tool in environmental education, directed to indoorenvironment quality, that permits the prediction and visualization of air movement, air temperature and air contaminant (such as tobacco smoke) distribution in rooms. With suitable mathematical models and boundary conditions, a computational code has been developed to predict and visualize these phenomena. In order to demonstrate its applicability, the simulation of air contamination distribution in an office room with a smoker was performed.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Kofi Agyekum, Elorm Emil Koku Akli-Nartey, Augustine Senanu Kukah and Amma Kyewaa Agyekum

The excellence in design and greater efficiencies (EDGE) certification system has seen a gradual adoption worldwide, with Ghana having six out of its eight certified green…

Abstract

Purpose

The excellence in design and greater efficiencies (EDGE) certification system has seen a gradual adoption worldwide, with Ghana having six out of its eight certified green buildings bearing an EDGE certification. However, little is known about occupants’ satisfaction with the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) of EDGE-certified buildings. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine the satisfaction of occupants with the IEQ of an EDGE-certified building in Ghana by identifying their perceived performance of the indoor environment relative to their perceived importance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted to evaluate the performance of 12 IEQ parameters with the occupants of an EDGE-certified office building. The survey results were evaluated using a gap analysis and both traditional and alternative Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA) matrices.

Findings

The findings revealed that noise level, temperature, cleanliness, sound privacy, air quality and humidity were IEQs that required the highest priority for improvement. Daylight and artificial lighting showed no appreciable performance gap. Space layout was adequately satisfied, whereas space size was overly satisfied. Visual privacy and outdoor view were found to require low priority of improvement.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the state-of-the-art of the IEQ of green buildings. It pioneers the research that seeks to examine the IEQ of EDGE-certified buildings. The gap analysis and the IPA were effective in prioritizing the IEQs for improvement action and provided a practical research framework that helped researchers examine the performance of green buildings, thereby giving valuable feedback to policymakers and building owners.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000