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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Maman Setiawan, Nury Effendi, Ratni Heliati and Alfi Syahrin Ario Waskito

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the technical efficiency (TE) of micro and small enterprises (MSEs) and its determinants in the Indonesian manufacturing sector…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the technical efficiency (TE) of micro and small enterprises (MSEs) and its determinants in the Indonesian manufacturing sector covering comprehensive subsectors.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses the data from the micro and small industry survey sourced from the Indonesian Bureau of Central Statistics for the period 2010–2015. The TE is estimated using data envelopment analysis (DEA) with bootstrapping approach. The TE is also estimated at the firm-level survey data, classified at the five-digit level of the International Standard Industrial Classification system. In addition, a truncated regression model is applied to estimate the effects of the determinants on the TE.

Findings

This research finds that there is a low average TE of the MSEs for the subsectors investigated. It is also found that the TE is associated with firm size, location, export orientations on domestic and world markets, firm age, level of technology, and owner education.

Originality/value

The literature investigating the TE of the MSEs and its determinants is still rare in Indonesia. Most of the previous research limited the studies for specific subsectors and/or specific small regions. Therefore, this research has a contribution in measuring the TE of the MSEs for comprehensive subsectors as well as its relation with the determinants in the Indonesian manufacturing sector. Also, the DEA with bootstrapping approach is applied to estimate the TE of the firms based on each relevant subsector, which is rare in the previous research of the Indonesian MSEs.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Doddy Setiawan and Lian Kee Phua

This study aims at examining the impact of corporate governance on dividend policy among Indonesian companies. There are two theories of the effect of corporate governance…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at examining the impact of corporate governance on dividend policy among Indonesian companies. There are two theories of the effect of corporate governance on dividend policy: substitution and outcome theory. Substitution theory argue that corporate governance have negative effect on dividend policy, while outcome theory argue that corporate governance have positive effect on dividend policy. Therefore, this study investigates the effect of corporate governance on dividend policy in Indonesia. This study aims at examining the impact of corporate governance on dividend policy among Indonesian companies. There are two theories of the effect of corporate governance on dividend policy: substitution and outcome theory. Substitution theory argue that corporate governance have negative effect on dividend policy, while outcome theory argue that corporate governance have positive effect on dividend policy. Therefore, this study investigates the effect of corporate governance on dividend policy in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample of this research comprises 248 firms from Indonesian Stock Exchange during 2004-2006. This research using Transparency and Disclosure Index (TDI) to measure corporate governance in Indonesia

Findings

We find that TDI are low among Indonesian firms, with a score of 32 per cent out of the maximum point. This score indicates that Indonesian corporate governance is still low. The results show that there is a negative relation between corporate governance and dividend policy in Indonesia. Thus, the Indonesian companies pay more dividends when corporate governance practice is low. This result confirms applicable of substitution theory in Indonesia.

Research limitations/implications

This research focuses on manufacturing industry in Indonesia. Therefore, the conclusions of this research apply on the manufacturing companies in Indonesia

Practical implications

This research shows that companies with poor corporate governance pay dividend higher than companies with better corporate governance. Thus, investor can use this information to make investment decision.

Originality/value

This research provides evidence on the negative effect of corporate governance on dividend policy in Indonesia (substitution theory).

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 14 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Yane Chandera and Lukas Setia-Atmaja

This study examines the impact of firm-bank relationships on bank loan spreads and the mitigating role of firm credit ratings on that impact.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the impact of firm-bank relationships on bank loan spreads and the mitigating role of firm credit ratings on that impact.

Design/methodology/approach

The study sample consists of Indonesian publicly listed companies for the period 2006 to 2016; bank-loan data was extracted from the Loan Pricing Corporation Dealscan database. For the degree of firm-bank relationships, the data on each loan is manually computed, using five different methods taken from Bharath et al. (2011) and Fields et al. (2012). All of the regression analyses are controlled for the year fixed effects, heteroscedasticity, and firm-level clustering. To address the endogeneity issues, this study uses several methods, including partitioning the sample, running nearest-neighbour and propensity score matching tests, and using instrumental variables in two-staged least-squares regression models.

Findings

In line with relationship theory and in opposition to the hold-up argument, this study finds that lending relationships reduce bank loan spreads and that the impact is more noticeable among non-rated Indonesian firms. Specifically, each additional unit in the total number of years of a firm-bank relationship and the number of previous loan contracts with the same bank are associated with 7.34 and 9.15 basis-point decreases, respectively, in these loan spreads.

Practical implications

Corporations and banks should maintain close, long-term relationships to reduce the screening and monitoring costs of borrowing. Regulators should create public policies that encourage banks to put more emphasis on relationships in their lending practices, especially in relation to crisis-prone companies.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to examine the impact of lending relationships on bank loan spreads in Indonesia. The study offers insights on banking relationships in emerging markets with concentrated banking industries, underdeveloped capital markets and prominent business-group affiliations.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2009

Dezie L. Warganegara and Intan Indriastari

This study attempts to provide evidence on earnings management of Indonesian firms one year prior to going public. The focus of this study is abnormal portion of accruals…

Abstract

This study attempts to provide evidence on earnings management of Indonesian firms one year prior to going public. The focus of this study is abnormal portion of accruals. These accruals are estimated using methodologies proposed by Dechow et al. (1995), and Kothari et al. (2005). This study finds no evidence that, on average, Indonesian firms manipulate their reported earnings to obtain higher proceeds from their IPOs. The findings stand even after size and leverage levels are considered in evaluating the incidences of earnings managements prior to IPOs. These findings support the arguments of Watts (2003) that empirical evidences show that public firms utilize conservative accounting and the practice becomes more conservative lately. It is also in line with Ball and Shivakumar’s argument (2005 and 2006) that the demand, for higher quality financial reports from public investors, forces IPO firms to improve their reporting quality prior to IPO and that regulation of publicly‐listed companies imposes greater requirements than non‐listed companies.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2019

Febi Trihermanto and Yunieta Anny Nainggolan

This paper aims to examine the association between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate life cycle as well as dividend policy in Indonesia.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the association between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate life cycle as well as dividend policy in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops two hypotheses that are tested empirically through multivariate settings. The tests are conducted using a sample of 527 Indonesian listed firms and 923 Indonesian firm-year observations between 2008 and 2015.

Findings

The findings support the hypothesis that CSR expenses increase when firms enter the maturity stage of their life cycle. On the triple bottom line components of CSR, firms which invest on CSR economic are in their maturity stage of their life cycle. The evidence also suggests that firms’ social donation and charitable giving increase as firms become mature. Furthermore, the strong evidence supports the hypothesis that firms’ CSR expenses positively affect dividend policy. This finding is robust to the alternative measurement of dividend payout, additional firms’ characteristics and instrumental variable to address endogeneity.

Practical implications

For investors in Indonesian listed firms, it is more profitable to invest in socially responsible firms than socially irresponsible firms. For firms, the results imply that spending in CSR does not reduce performance, thus becoming attractive for investors.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there is thin literature investigating the relation between corporate life cycle, CSR, and dividend policy in emerging markets while it is important as it could encourage companies to integrate CSR into their business strategy and transparently disclose their CSR activities. Further, as previous research on these topics mainly conducted using the US data (Rakotomavo, 2012; Benlemlih, 2014; Hasan and Habib, 2017), which most of CSR disclosures are voluntary, this paper contributes to the existing literature by examining these topics in a country where CSR is mandatory by the law.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Rayenda Khresna Brahmana, Doddy Setiawan and Chee Wooi Hooy

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the presence of controlling shareholder affects the value of diversification based on Indonesian listed firms. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the presence of controlling shareholder affects the value of diversification based on Indonesian listed firms. It further examines whether the degree of controlling ownership and the types of controlling ownership matter.

Design/methodology/approach

Panel data were used over the period 2006-2010 with dynamic generalised method-of-moments estimations and it defined diversification as industrial diversification, international diversification or diversification in both. A few different thresholds for the control rights of the largest shareholder are also set.

Findings

The results show that industrial diversification improves firm value but international diversification does not, while diversified in both strategies discounted firm value. The presence of a controlling shareholder is found to have a significant diversification discount, and the effect is nonlinear, where the entrenchment effect occurs around 20 to60 per cent threshold of controlling across all types of diversified firms. Last, foreign firms are found to enjoy more value from industrial diversification, but it takes an adverse turn when these involve both diversification strategies. Government firms do not seem to be different from family firms.

Research limitations/implications

The study shows the need to differentiate diversification strategies and account for non-linearity and ownership identity in modelling diversification value. Also, the degree of shareholders’ control can be a significant channel to address the agency issue on diversification value.

Practical implications

Under the backdrop of unique Indonesian corporate ownership, the presence of controlling owners is shown, and their ownership affects the value of diversification. The entrenchment effect however appears only at a certain range of ownership. This is a crucial guide for the shareholders to ensure an appropriate monitoring system is installed to maximize the shareholder’s value, especially in family firms.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is twofold. At first, the first empirical evidence on the diversification debate with Indonesian firms for its unique institutional setting is presented. Second, the standard modelling framework to investigate the types of ownership on diversification value is extended, which has rarely been covered in previous investigations.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2020

Miranda Tanjung

The study aims to construct a cross-firm corporate governance index to predict firm performance. The index consists of 15 governance elements from a large sample of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to construct a cross-firm corporate governance index to predict firm performance. The index consists of 15 governance elements from a large sample of the Indonesian firms covering the period from 2003 to 2013.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents robust results as the findings are tested by applying the generalized method of moments (GMM) estimator to eliminate endogeneity problems and unobservable heterogeneity posed by the relationship between performance and firm-level governance practices.

Findings

The results indicate that the corporate governance index is associated with enhanced corporate financial performance. Likewise, the findings reported under the pooled ordinary least squares and GMM also indicate corporate governance sub-indexes (elements), which have significant effects on performance: whistleblower mechanism, audit quality, board of director size and blockholders.

Research limitations/implications

In the emerging market context, this study supports the notion that active and self-regulated governance practices are appreciated by the market and, in the end, can have a positive impact on financial performance. The analysis adds to the empirical literature by providing insights into how governance provisions are being actively implemented in the micro level. With regard to weak governance practices, this study is consistent with previous studies, according to which, firms have the opportunity to use corporate governance as a way of differentiating themselves from other players in countries with poorly regulated investor protection and institutional settings.

Originality/value

This study makes a positive contribution, as it looks at the impact of Indonesia’s corporate governance compliance on the basis of a set of 15 unique governance provisions, including the findings of the positive influence of corporate governance in family business.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2019

Bayu Khresna Sangka, Shams Rahman, Aswini Yadlapalli and Ferry Jie

The purpose of this paper is to identify and prioritise competencies of Indonesian third-party logistics (3PL) managers from the perspective of multinational corporations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and prioritise competencies of Indonesian third-party logistics (3PL) managers from the perspective of multinational corporations (MNCs) and local firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Underlined by the theory of action and job performance (competency model), the study proposes a framework that consists of management, logistics, business and information and communication technology competency categories, with 15 competencies. Data are collected from five MNCs and five local 3PL firms operating in Indonesia. The analytic hierarchy process method is used to calculate the priority weights and to prioritise the competencies.

Findings

Results indicate that both the local and MNC 3PL providers emphasise logistics as the “most important” competency category. In the “moderately important” competency group, MNCs prioritise competencies in the management competency category while local firms prioritise competencies in the business competency category.

Research limitations/implications

Results obtained in this study focus on 3PL firms in Indonesian businesses, which may not be applicable to other nations and other industries.

Practical implications

3PL firms, industry peak bodies (e.g. Indonesian Logistics Association) and education providers can benefit from incorporating the findings of this study in developing curricula for higher education and training programmes for certification designed to improve managerial competencies.

Originality/value

By including the perceptions of the MNCs and local 3PL providers, this study advances the literature on 3PL managerial competencies by extending such knowledge to the global environment.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Neil Semuel Rupidara and Roger Darby

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the isomorphism phenomenon in the Indonesian HR field. It also attempts to identify characteristics of a highly isomorphic field…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the isomorphism phenomenon in the Indonesian HR field. It also attempts to identify characteristics of a highly isomorphic field which tend to be overlooked in institutional analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted within a qualitative, interpretive paradigm. Both primary and secondary data sources were utilized in this study. Primary data were obtained from more than 56 interviews, including informal talks and observations. Two types of interviews were conducted, i.e., face to face, narrative, open-ended interviews with HR professionals, consultants and academics and e-mail interviews with several of the HR professionals who were involved in several HR mailing lists in Indonesia.

Findings

HR field in Indonesia shows how institutional influences work, characterized by the diffusion and adoption of human resource practices among foreign multinational and large local companies in Indonesia. HR actors within organizations interact with multiple, and often competing, ideas within complex and overlapping multi-institutional settings and take decisions explained by the characteristics of Indonesian HRM as an isomorphic field.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to be conducted in similar isomorphic fields to identify the characteristics and whether or not they confirm the results of this research. Further research into the HR field in Indonesia is also suggested to uncover deep-seated institutional logics and mechanisms that can facilitate or constrain future changes in the field. As a transitional field usually contains different, sometimes conflicting, institutional pressures in influencing the direction of change, a better knowledge of how the conflicting forces work is needed to provide understanding about how to steer a well-informed institutional change.

Practical implications

Involvement in the networks of diffusion of ideas can benefit the HR professionals of participating firms. The study suggests an active but critical participation in the networks of HR ideas diffusion to obtain greater benefits. The study has shown the existence of different channels of HR knowledge transfer. HR actors therefore need to decide which channels might be more effective in the knowledge transfer. Because the different sources of ideas may provide conflicting ideas, HR actors may need to be mindful in their participation in the different networks to take advantage of them, rather than being confused by the conflicting forces.

Originality/value

This research contributes empirically to studies of isomorphism of HRM practices by providing evidence that connects the micro-organizational and the broader organizational field levels. A significant methodological contribution of this research is the use of observations and the participation in professionally oriented electronic mail-list groups as a method of investigating knowledge diffusion within a field.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Maman Setiawan and Alfons G.J.M. Oude Lansink

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relation between industrial concentration and technical inefficiency in the Indonesian food and beverages industry using a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relation between industrial concentration and technical inefficiency in the Indonesian food and beverages industry using a dynamic performance measure (dynamic technical inefficiency) that accounts for the presence of adjustment costs.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses panel data of 44 subsectors in the Indonesian food and beverages industry for the period 1980-2014. The dynamic input directional distance function is applied to estimate the dynamic technical inefficiency. Further, the Granger causality between industrial concentration and dynamic technical inefficiency is tested using a dynamic panel data model. A bootstrap truncated regression model is finally applied to estimate the relation between industrial concentration and dynamic technical inefficiency based on the results from the Granger causality test.

Findings

The results show that the Indonesian food and beverages industry has a high dynamic technical inefficiency. Investigation of the causality of the relation shows that industrial concentration has a positive effect on dynamic technical inefficiency at the subsector level, with no reversed causality. The results suggest that the quiet life hypothesis applies to the Indonesian food and beverages industry.

Originality/value

The literature investigating the relation between industrial concentration and performance relies on static measures of performance, such as technical efficiency. Static measures provide an incorrect metric of the firms’ performance in the presence of adjustment costs associated with investment. Therefore, this research has a contribution in measuring dynamic technical inefficiency that accounts for the presence of the adjustment cost as well as its relation with industrial concentration in the Indonesian food and beverages industry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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