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Book part
Publication date: 3 January 2015

Julia Shamir

While the concept of legal culture has been receiving a growing attention from scholars, this research often overemphasizes the similarity of the opinions held by…

Abstract

While the concept of legal culture has been receiving a growing attention from scholars, this research often overemphasizes the similarity of the opinions held by different segments of population. Furthermore, the relationship of migration and the change of legal-cultural attitudes has not received particular attention. Drawing on 70 in-depth interviews with the immigrants of the early 1990s from the former Soviet Union to Israel and the secular Israeli Jews, this chapter provides a comprehensive account of the various aspects of legal culture of these groups. The second important finding is the persistence of the legal-cultural attitudes and perceptions over time.

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Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-568-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

David Stokes and Richard Bergin

The aim of this research was to consider whether focus groups have justifiably become a more frequently used qualitative market research technique because of a superior…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research was to consider whether focus groups have justifiably become a more frequently used qualitative market research technique because of a superior research outcome. Although focus groups have extrinsic advantages such as speed and cost, there is evidence that individual depth interviews have intrinsic advantages relating to the quality of the research outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

A parallel research study was undertaken examining a single business issue using both focus groups and individual interviews. Results of both processes were analysed for relevance to the business issue. Follow up individual interviews with participants of the focus groups were undertaken to assess the validity of the data collected, and to investigate the nature of the processes in the groups.

Findings

Group processes appear to have had considerable influence on the consensus view expressed in focus groups, which may not be representative of respondents' individual views. Both the groups and the interviews identified the principle issues relating to buyer motivations and processes, target markets and branding. The groups were unable to match the depth and detail generated by individual interviews and to uncover subtleties in attitudes. The interviews offered less breadth of data and contextual information.

Practical implications

Whilst groups may be less expensive and faster in data collection, individual interviews demonstrated a superior ability to inform marketing strategy by uncovering important underlying issues.

Originality/value

The findings indicate that groups do not justify their predominance as a market research method in preference to interviews on the grounds of quality of outcomes alone.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Richaurd Camp, Eric Schulz, Mary Vielhaber and Fraya Wagner‐Marsh

This study examines human resource (HR) professionals' perceptions of the outcomes, process dynamics and affect toward team interviews. Results indicate HR professionals…

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3285

Abstract

This study examines human resource (HR) professionals' perceptions of the outcomes, process dynamics and affect toward team interviews. Results indicate HR professionals with experience conducting team interviews have significantly more positive views than HR professionals without experience. Additionally, African Americans, compared to Caucasians, expressed a significantly more positive view of the process dynamics of team interviews. Results indicate HR professionals were more positive about participating in team interviews as an interviewer than as an interviewee.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1977

Tony Keenan

It has been known for many years that the selection interview is often a far from perfect instrument. However, the unabated popularity of training courses in the selection…

Abstract

It has been known for many years that the selection interview is often a far from perfect instrument. However, the unabated popularity of training courses in the selection interview is only one of many indications that managers have no intention of abandoning its use. Given this, it is obviously very important that such training be designed to be maximally effective. This question of the effectiveness of interview training has been investigated as part of an ongoing research programme on the selection interview which is being carried out at Heriot‐Watt University. Both our research findings, and our practical experience of running interview courses ourselves, have led to the development of a new approach to interview training which we have called individual‐centred training. This article describes the origins and basic principles of individual‐centred training for interviewers.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 1 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Samuel B. McClelland

The second in a series exploring training needs assessment (TNA)data‐gathering methods, originally published in condensed form in anarticle entitled “Training Needs…

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4711

Abstract

The second in a series exploring training needs assessment (TNA) data‐gathering methods, originally published in condensed form in an article entitled “Training Needs Assessment: An ‘Open‐systems’ Application” in the Journal of European Industrial Training, Vol. 17 No. 1. The first presented and discussed the design and use of survey questionnaires. This presents and discusses individual interviewing techniques as well as behavioural implications inherent to the process. Additionally, presents telephone interviews, a variation of the individual interview method. Relevant research supports examples. Presents and discusses advantages as well as disadvantages. Concludes with a summary emphasizing that open‐ended individual interviews will provide the most valuable and relevant data.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Lotte Smets and Christina Pauwels

Although there is an international consensus concerning how police investigative interviews should be adequately and reliably conducted, daily police interview practices…

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1367

Abstract

Purpose

Although there is an international consensus concerning how police investigative interviews should be adequately and reliably conducted, daily police interview practices are still rather poor. It is hypothetically assumed that this may be caused by unsatisfactory interview training programmes. The purpose of this paper is to focus on a new type of interviewing training, the individual coaching project, where interpersonal interview competences are being defined and optimised.

Design/methodology/approach

Building upon previous studies, this paper reflects the outcome of an elaborate process concentrated on exploring new investigative interview training opportunities. In addition the interviewer's perceptions of feedback and mentoring were evaluated in order to study the feasibility and practicability of the individual coaching project.

Findings

Results showed that 72 per cent of the participating interviewers were very eager about their project participation. Almost all interviewers thought the coaching project was very worthwhile and instructive, and believed they really developed and optimised their interview skills.

Originality/value

The present paper innovatively contributes to the current discussion concerning investigative interviewing and training by concentrating and defining the role and necessity of ongoing feedback. Moreover this paper concentrates on the content of this new training project, which can be of high interest for the daily police interview practices.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 September 2021

Ulrica von Thiele Schwarz, Kin Andersson and Carina Loeb

The purpose is explore an approach to acquire, analyze and report data concerning an organizational change initiative that combines knowledge generation and knowledge use…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is explore an approach to acquire, analyze and report data concerning an organizational change initiative that combines knowledge generation and knowledge use, and contrast that with a method where knowledge generation and use is separated. More specifically, the authors contrast a participatory group workshop with individual interviews analyzed with thematic analysis, focusing on information about the change process and its perceived practical relevance and usefulness.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were managers responsible for implementing a broad organizational change aiming to improve service quality (e.g. access and equity) and reduce costs in a mental health service organization in Sweden. Individual interviews were conducted at two points, six months apart (i1: n = 15; i2: n = 18). Between the interviews, a 3.5-h participatory group workshop was conducted, during which participants (n = 15) both generated and analyzed data through a structured process that mixed individual-, small- and whole-group activities.

Findings

Both approaches elicited substantive information about the content, purpose and process of change. While the content and purpose findings were similar across the two data sources, the interviews described how to lead a change process, whereas the workshop yielded concrete information about what to do. Benefits of interviews included personal insights about leading change while the workshop provided an opportunity for collective sense-making.

Originality/value

When organizational stakeholders work through the change process through a participatory workshop, they may get on the same page, but require additional support to take action.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

David Murphy and Hannah Mullens

Although individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) represent a small proportion of forensic psychiatric patients as a group they present with specific…

Abstract

Purpose

Although individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) represent a small proportion of forensic psychiatric patients as a group they present with specific difficulties and needs. There is also evidence that if detained individuals with an ASD experience particular difficulties within custodial environments as a result of a mismatch between the difficulties associated with their ASD and the environmental demands. The purpose of this paper is to explore the experience of individuals with an ASD admitted to a high secure psychiatric care (HSPC) hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

Using both a semi-structured interview and a quality of life self-report measure (the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile) the experiences and views of seven patients with an ASD detained in one HSPC hospital were qualitatively explored.

Findings

Whilst a diverse range of negative and positive aspects of being within HSPC were identified by patients interviewed, those with prison experience thought HSPC was a less stressful environment with more therapeutic opportunities. As a group, patients with an ASD reported a similar or significantly better quality of life in many domains (global, leisure, financial and living situation) compared to other detained forensic patient groups.

Practical implications

Although most patients with an ASD interviewed reported positive experiences, there are a number of practical improvements that could be made within the hospital to reduce experienced stress levels and perhaps improve therapeutic outcomes.

Originality/value

Within the context of the Department of Health's autism strategy (2010) and subsequent update think autism (2014), the survey highlights continued ASD awareness training for staff as important. In responding to the risks and needs of individuals with an ASD in HSPC there is further support for the development of an ASD specialist service.

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Jon R.G.M. Lekander

The asset allocation decision for a pension portfolio needs to consider several, sometimes conflicting, aspects. Most pension managers use models and processes that are…

Abstract

Purpose

The asset allocation decision for a pension portfolio needs to consider several, sometimes conflicting, aspects. Most pension managers use models and processes that are developed for the traditional asset classes for analyzing this problem. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how real estate is included in this process, for what purpose and how the real estate portfolio is constructed.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven individuals responsible for the asset allocation process were interviewed, and their responses were analyzed with regards to organizational options and their real estate strategy.

Findings

It was found that real estate is held for three different purposes, risk diversification, inflation hedging/liability matching and return enhancement and that the allocation has increased over time. The allocation strategy has evolved at least in part in conjuncture with the organizational structure set in place to overcome real estate market frictions.

Research limitations/implications

The interviews were geographically limited to pension funds domiciled in Sweden and Finland.

Practical implications

It is concluded that the organizational capabilities of the pension fund of handling real estate is an important consideration for the ensuing real estate portfolio.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in that it is based on interviews with individuals who are responsible for the asset allocation decision at large pension funds. The findings of the paper identify areas of interest for future research.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Cristian Castillo, Vicenc Fernandez and Jose Maria Sallan

The purpose of this paper is to define a model that both describes the evolution of the emotional stages of individuals during perceived negative organizational change and…

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4947

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define a model that both describes the evolution of the emotional stages of individuals during perceived negative organizational change and explains the evolution of their behavioral patterns and the effects on relationships with social environments (family, friends, co-workers, supervisor and organization).

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodological research design was adopted, using individual interviews as the primary method of qualitative data collection. In total, 15 people who experienced perceived negative organizational changes participated in this research.

Findings

Through empirical qualitative research, an adapted Kübler (1969) model was used as a starting point. Co-occurrence analysis of the interviews led to the combination of the first two stages (denial and anger) of this model because they always appeared together. Two new stages (revising and deserting), based on the research of Schalk and Roe (2007), complete the model. Subsequently, the model comprised six emotional stages: denial and anger, bargaining, depression, revising, deserting and acceptance. The results show that individuals can move freely between the first four stages, but deserting and acceptance are always the final stages. Experiencing these emotional stages can influence the relationships between individuals and their social environments. During “denial and anger” and “bargaining,” the relationships with family, friends and co-workers improve; but during depression, the relationships with family and friends deteriorate, but because co-workers become much more important, those relationships improve. Relationships with supervisors deteriorate during denial and anger and depression but remain stable during bargaining.

Research limitations/implications

Time’s passage became an inconvenience accounted for during data collection. Over time, separate events can be confused, and nuances that were once determinants can be eliminated. Longitudinal studies at various stages of the change process would complement these results.

Practical implications

These results can guide managers in foreseeing and anticipating the actions that would reduce the emotional impact of organizational change and mitigate the impact of individuals’ negative emotions on the organization.

Originality/value

This paper extends the existing theory about the strategies of coping and organizational changes.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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