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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Michele N. Medina

This paper aims to investigate the mediating effect of an individual’s satisfaction with the team between conflict and training motivation. This study provides…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the mediating effect of an individual’s satisfaction with the team between conflict and training motivation. This study provides understanding regarding how the type of conflict within a team can influence an individual’s team experience which can, in turn, influence that individual’s training motivation and impact future teams.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 498 upper-level business students engaged in a team project. Structural equation modeling examined the serial mediation relationship between perceived diversity, conflict (affective and cognitive), individual satisfaction with the team and training motivation (learning and transfer).

Findings

Individual satisfaction with the team partially mediates the relationship between affective conflict and both training motivation dimensions, and fully mediates the relationship between cognitive conflict and both training motivation dimensions.

Practical implications

To encourage future participation in teams, managers should explore ways to increase an individual’s satisfaction, such as increasing the cognitive conflict by incorporating diversity within teams and reducing the affective conflict within teams. Likewise, by increasing an individual’s satisfaction with the team, managers can increase both the motivation to learn and transfer new knowledge.

Originality/value

This paper illuminates the role that an individual’s satisfaction with the team has between conflict and training motivation. Moreover, this paper demonstrates that more research on an individual’s satisfaction with the team is needed.

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 22 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Antonio D. Sirianni

Expectations ostensibly lead to the formation of hierarchies, and hierarchies are thought to improve coordination. A simulation model is introduced to determine whether…

Abstract

Purpose

Expectations ostensibly lead to the formation of hierarchies, and hierarchies are thought to improve coordination. A simulation model is introduced to determine whether expectations directly improve coordination.

Methodology/approach

Agent-based simulations of small group behavior are used to determine what rules for expectation formation best coordinate groups. Within groups of agents that have differing but unknown task abilities, pairs take turns playing a coordination game with one another. The group receives a positive payoff when one agent chooses to take a high-importance role (leader) and the other chooses a low-importance role (follower), where the payoff is proportional to the ability of the “leader.” When both individuals vie to be leader, a costly conflict gives the group information about which agent has a higher task-ability.

Findings

The rules governing individuals’ formation of expectations about one another often lead to coordination that is suboptimal: They do not capitalize on the differential abilities of group members. The rules do, however, minimize costly conflicts between individuals. Therefore, standard rules of expectation formation are only optimal when conflicts are costly or provide poor information.

Implications

Rules that govern the formation of expectations may have served an evolutionary purpose in guiding individuals towards coordination while minimizing conflict, but these psychologically hardwired rules lead to suboptimal hierarchies.

Originality

This paper looks at how well empirically observed expectation-generating rules lead to group coordination by adding a game theoretic conception of interaction to the e-state structuralism model of hierarchy formation.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-013-4

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Hee Sun Park and Mijeang Park

This research aims to examine the relationship between conflict management in the workplace and member satisfaction in work groups at both individual and group levels.

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine the relationship between conflict management in the workplace and member satisfaction in work groups at both individual and group levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The objectives were achieved by surveying 135 Korean teachers in 28 kindergartens, treating them as small work groups. A multilevel modeling technique was used to examine the impact of conflict management preferences on individual satisfaction with group processes.

Findings

For the cooperation style of conflict management, individual‐level preference and group‐level similarity in preference were related positively to individual satisfaction with group processes. Individual‐level preference and group‐level similarity in preference for the avoidance style, however, did not significantly influence individual satisfaction with group processes. It was also found that the positive relationship between individual preference for the cooperation style and satisfaction with group processes was stronger with less variation (i.e. greater similarity) in group‐level preference for the cooperation style and with greater variation (i.e. less similarity) in group‐level preference for the avoidance style. Research limitations/implications – No causality can be established between conflict management style preferences and satisfaction with group processes. Only two styles of conflict management were assessed with a small number of measurement items.

Originality/value

The study shows how useful a multilevel examination of conflict management style preferences and satisfaction with group processes can be for conflict research.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Theresa A. MacNeil and Kari Adamsons

The purpose if this study is to examine differences in conflict management strategies, relational satisfaction and social support of individuals in same-race and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose if this study is to examine differences in conflict management strategies, relational satisfaction and social support of individuals in same-race and interracial relationships. Additionally, the authors examined associations between self-reported and observed measures of conflict management strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study used Bronfenbrenner’s (2005) bioecological theory as an organizing framework. Twenty individuals in interracial and same-race relationships were recruited from a large Northeastern US university. Self-report and observational measures of conflict management strategies were obtained as were individuals’ self-reported levels of relational satisfaction and social support.

Findings

Results indicated a few differences in conflict management strategies between individuals in same-race and interracial dyads and no differences in social support or satisfaction. Observational measures of conflict management were largely uncorrelated with their corresponding self-report measures.

Research limitations/implications

The current sample was small and consisted of students from a predominately White region of the country; thus generalizability and statistical power are limited. However, the results suggest ways interracial and same-race dyads might manage conflict differently as well as how self-reported and observational methods might differ in terms of the results obtained.

Originality/value

Interracial couple relationship processes are largely unexplored, but are important to study. The current findings further suggest that self-report and observational methods should be combined to more fully portray the conflict management strategies of individuals in interracial and same-race relationships.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Yang Woon Chung

This study aims to examine the mediating effects of organizational conflict on the relationships between workplace ostracism with in-role behavior and organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the mediating effects of organizational conflict on the relationships between workplace ostracism with in-role behavior and organizational citizenship behaviors. The workplace is a social context where many individuals spend a great amount of their time. Frequently being excluded or ignored is a common experience within all social contexts, and the study emphasizes how those feelings can affect organizational members. The current study extends research, as prior empirical studies have focused mainly on the direct consequences of workplace ostracism.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was longitudinally designed, as data were collected using a two-wave self-reported survey. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were conducted to test the study’s hypotheses.

Findings

The study found workplace ostracism to be positively related to coworker conflict, supervisor conflict and task conflict. Coworker conflict was found to fully mediate the relationships between workplace ostracism with in-role behavior and organizational citizenship behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

As the study was conducted in Korea, the results cannot be generalizable and should be tested in Western cultures. Although the study was longitudinally designed, the first-wave survey measured the independent variable, while the second-wave survey measured the mediating and dependent variables. Also, self-reported surveys are always of concern; thus, multiple sources should be considered to strengthen the research model’s relationships.

Practical implications

Organizations and managers need to continuously address the quality of interpersonal relationships among all organizational members. As studies reveal that being “out of the loop” is quite a common phenomenon, individual and organizational performance can be greatly affected, as work is becoming more interdependent and team work is frequently implemented within organizations.

Social implications

Individuals interact in numerous social contexts and as the workplace is an important context where many individuals spend a lot of their time and interact with other organizational members, the quality of the relationships at work can have spillover effects that can affect interpersonal relationships outside of the workplace.

Originality/value

The study explores and empirically tests the mediating effects of organizational conflict on the relationships between workplace ostracism with in-role behavior and organizational citizenship behaviors. The study extends research on the consequences of workplace ostracism and helps further understand how workplace ostracism can affect workplace attitudes and behaviors.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Book part
Publication date: 17 February 2015

Phyllis Moen, Anne Kaduk, Ellen Ernst Kossek, Leslie Hammer, Orfeu M. Buxton, Emily O’Donnell, David Almeida, Kimberly Fox, Eric Tranby, J. Michael Oakes and Lynne Casper

Most research on the work conditions and family responsibilities associated with work-family conflict and other measures of mental health uses the individual employee as…

Abstract

Purpose

Most research on the work conditions and family responsibilities associated with work-family conflict and other measures of mental health uses the individual employee as the unit of analysis. We argue that work conditions are both individual psychosocial assessments and objective characteristics of the proximal work environment, necessitating multilevel analyses of both individual- and team-level work conditions on mental health.

Methodology/approach

This study uses multilevel data on 748 high-tech professionals in 120 teams to investigate relationships between team- and individual-level job conditions, work-family conflict, and four mental health outcomes (job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, perceived stress, and psychological distress).

Findings

We find that work-to-family conflict is socially patterned across teams, as are job satisfaction and emotional exhaustion. Team-level job conditions predict team-level outcomes, while individuals’ perceptions of their job conditions are better predictors of individuals’ work-to-family conflict and mental health. Work-to-family conflict operates as a partial mediator between job demands and mental health outcomes.

Practical implications

Our findings suggest that organizational leaders concerned about presenteeism, sickness absences, and productivity would do well to focus on changing job conditions in ways that reduce job demands and work-to-family conflict in order to promote employees’ mental health.

Originality/value of the chapter

We show that both work-to-family conflict and job conditions can be fruitfully framed as team characteristics, shared appraisals held in common by team members. This challenges the framing of work-to-family conflict as a “private trouble” and provides support for work-to-family conflict as a structural mismatch grounded in the social and temporal organization of work.

Details

Work and Family in the New Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-630-0

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2020

Philippe Eiselein and Nikolay A. Dentchev

Most strategies for managing conflicts between social and commercial objectives of social enterprises are discussed either at the individual or at the team level of…

Abstract

Purpose

Most strategies for managing conflicts between social and commercial objectives of social enterprises are discussed either at the individual or at the team level of analysis. This paper aims to argue in favor of taking into account both levels of analysis at the same time. It furthermore aims to unravel how management strategies at the individual and the team level reinforce one another.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts the theoretical lenses of personal values (at the individual level of analysis) and stewardship (at the team level). The authors have conducted 23 semi-structured interviews across three Belgian social enterprises. Primary data collection was complemented with secondary data of 12 annual reports and 314 newspaper articles. The variety of cases and the richness of primary and secondary data proved useful to elaborate on the mechanisms of managing conflicting objectives.

Findings

This paper highlights four bridging mechanisms that facilitate the mitigation of conflict between social and commercial objectives, i.e. fit of values, agile structure, partnerships and communications. It also shows how these mechanisms reinforce each other at the individual and team levels of analysis and thus form an iterative process for managing the conflicting objectives of social entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

This paper contributes by bringing the level of analysis on managing conflicting objectives at the intersection of the individual and team performance. It argues that social entrepreneurs should target both individuals and teams at the same time, to manage effectively conflicting objectives. The four mechanisms create an alignment and reflection iterative process for managing conflicting objectives.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Ariel Avgar, Eun Kyung Lee and WonJoon Chung

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating effect of discretion and social capital on the relationship between individual perceptions of team conflict and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating effect of discretion and social capital on the relationship between individual perceptions of team conflict and employee-level outcomes. The authors propose that both employee discretion and unit-level social capital influence the negative effects of perceived conflict on employee stress and turnover intentions. They argue that an individual’s perceptions of these central organizational characteristics are likely to alter the consequences associated with conflict and the manner in which individuals respond to it.

Design/methodology/approach

This study empirically tests the moderating effects of discretion and unit-level social capital on the relationship between individual’s perception of team conflict and employee-level outcomes. Analysis was conducted with survey data from a sample of health care care providers in 90 units across 20 nursing home organizations. We applied hierarchical linear modeling analyses to test our hypotheses.

Findings

Results demonstrate that employee discretion moderates the relationship between perceived task conflict and job stress. Unit-level social capital was shown to moderate the relationship between perceived relationship conflict and employee turnover intentions. Our findings also document a varied moderation effect at low to moderate levels of conflict versus high levels of conflict. This finding suggests that the moderating role of contextual variables is more nuanced and complex than the existing conceptual frameworks acknowledge.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the research on conflict and conflict management by extending a multilevel approach to the effect of conflict and by providing new insights regarding the contextual manner in which conflict affects workplace outcomes.

Practical implications

The effects of discretion and unit-level social capital on how conflict is metabolized by organizations and their members varied. Contextual factors matter differently for different individual level outcomes. In attempting to manage the consequences associated with workplace conflict, organizations and their managers must consider different contextual factors.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the research on conflict and its management in organization by providing new insights regarding the contextual manner in which conflict affects organizational and individual outcomes. This study provides support for the claim that the relational and task-related context under which employees experience conflict affects employee stress levels and the extent to which they report their intentions to leave the organization.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2019

Wei-Tsong Wang, Yi-Shun Wang and Wan-Ting Chang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how different forms of interpersonal conflicts and employees’ psychological empowerment may affect knowledge sharing intentions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how different forms of interpersonal conflicts and employees’ psychological empowerment may affect knowledge sharing intentions directly or indirectly via interpersonal trust in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data collected from 249 employees of 37 of the top 500 corporations in the manufacturing industry in Taiwan were used for the data analysis. The research model was analyzed using the component-based structural equation modeling technique, namely, the partial least squares (PLS) approach.

Findings

The results indicate that both relationship and task conflicts have significant indirect effects on employees’ knowledge sharing intentions via psychological empowerment and trust. Additionally, psychological empowerment significantly influences employees’ knowledge sharing intentions both directly and indirectly via trust.

Research limitations/implications

The primary theoretical implication is an advancement in the understanding of the critical antecedents of and their different effects on employees’ knowledge sharing intentions from the perspectives of conflict management and individual psychological empowerment. Future research may concentrate on investigating the bidirectional interactions among trust, relationship conflicts and task conflicts in different knowledge-sharing contexts.

Practical implications

This study provides practical insights into conflict resolution intended to facilitate psychological empowerment and interpersonal trust that encourage knowledge sharing in the workplace.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first knowledge sharing study that empirically examines how task and relationship conflicts affect employees’ knowledge sharing intentions differently via the mediation of their perceived psychological empowerment and interpersonal trust in one another in the workplace.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Gabriela Gonçalves, Marta Reis, Cátia Sousa, Joana Santos, Alejandro Orgambídez-Ramos and Peter Scott

Negotiating effectively in multicultural contexts or others is not only a very important skill for all organizational elements but also crucial to inter-organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

Negotiating effectively in multicultural contexts or others is not only a very important skill for all organizational elements but also crucial to inter-organizational relations (Adler, 2008). If defined as a process that occurs when one party feels adversely affected by another (De Dreu, 1997). Conflict management styles can be analyzed as a function of personality variables. In this respect, cultural intelligence and self-monitoring appear to be relevant variables, as they are characterized by the demonstration of flexibility and interest in elements that are present in conflict management styles. This study aimed to evaluate the extent to which variables such as cultural intelligence and self-monitoring can positively influence the ability to solve interpersonal conflicts more effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

This study, with a sample of 399 individuals, aimed to test a model that explores how cultural intelligence and self-monitoring are related as predictor variables in the styles of conflict resolution.

Findings

It was observed that cultural intelligence presents itself as a reasonable predictor of conflict management styles, whereas self-monitoring appeared as a dispositional and controversial measure in relation to those styles. Self-monitoring exhibited itself as an important predictor of conflict management, but on the other hand, it had an influence on the choice of the dominating style in conflict situations.

Practical implications

Understanding the predictors of conflict management style and, in particular, realizing the extent to which cultural intelligence promotes a more effective conflict management style can help in the development of selection processes and skill training programs. The development of these multicultural skills will contribute to individual, social and organizational well-being.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature of individual differences and conflict management, demonstrating that some individual differences that predict the styles of conflict management can lead to a certain ambiguity in understanding the behaviour that an individual may adopt in situations of conflict.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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