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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Geir Grenersen, Kjell Kemi and Steinar Nilsen

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the following questions: what is the origin of the concepts of documents and documentation? Are there a need for these concepts in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the following questions: what is the origin of the concepts of documents and documentation? Are there a need for these concepts in every culture? Who gives the terms for their definitions, and what are the consequences of different terminology?

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use interdisciplinary methodology, combining document and information theory and Sámi linguistics. The aim of this paper is to discuss documentation from the perspective of the Sámi, with some examples from other indigenous groups.

Findings

Oral accounts, legends, traditional songs and traces in the landscape are seen as documents and documentation in Sámi and other indigenous cultures. The paper presents different theories in order to interpret and understand the specific information content in indigenous forms of documentation.

Practical implications

Indigenous ways of documentation have been accepted as valid proof of ownership or the right to extensive use of land resources. When no written records exist, oral testimonies and the landscape itself can be seen as documenting traditional use and has been accepted as evidence in high courts in Norway and Canada. The authors have also seen that the rich Sámi snow terminology is used as concepts in different fields of natural sciences.

Originality/value

The Sámi understanding of the concepts of document and documentation contributes to the traditional information and documentation disciplines by introducing ways of seeing natural phenomenon as fundamental forms of information.

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Geir Grenersen

The Sámis are the indigenous population of Northern Scandinavia. When the oppressive policy against the Sámi population in Norway was lightened during the 1960s, many Sámi…

Abstract

Purpose

The Sámis are the indigenous population of Northern Scandinavia. When the oppressive policy against the Sámi population in Norway was lightened during the 1960s, many Sámi communities established language and cultural centers for documentation and development of their language and cultural heritage as the oral tradition lost its ground in the modernization process. This paper aims to discuss how Sámi cultural centers use documentation both as a way of remembering the past and as a political strategy in order to produce evidence for land and water claims.

Design/methodology/approach

The Sámi centers are many‐faceted institutions and document theory is suggested as a theoretical perspective in order to analyze why these institutions were established and how they are functioning today.

Findings

Two cases are presented. The first shows how the centers use documentation as a technique for restoring the past. The second is a ruling in the Norwegian High Court that shows a new turn in what can be accepted as documents proving indigenous land and water claims.

Originality/value

This article is an attempt to introduce document theory as an analytical tool for analyzing the documentation processes in indigenous cultural centers.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 68 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Ida Madieha Abdul Ghani Azmi

Traditional cultural expression (TCE) includes music, dance, art, designs, names, signs and symbols, performances, ceremonies, architectural forms, handicrafts and…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional cultural expression (TCE) includes music, dance, art, designs, names, signs and symbols, performances, ceremonies, architectural forms, handicrafts and narratives or many other artistic or cultural expressions [World Intellectual Property Office (WIPO)]. To constitute TCEs, the expressions must form part of the identity and heritage of a traditional or indigenous community and need to be passed down from generation to generation (Kuprecht, 2014). This paper aims to analyse the protection of TCE in Malaysia by focusing on the Mah Meri tribe. This paper examines copyright over TCE, recordation as a means of preserving a dying tradition and customary practices and native law.

Design/methodology/approach

Information is drawn from personal discussions with the weavers and carvers of the Mah Meri tribe, and a focus group discussion with subject matter experts. As a way of comparison, a personal visit has been made to Sarawak Biodiversity Centre, Sarawak Native Courts, the Dayak Iban Association and Dayak Bidayuh Association.

Findings

The research found that copyright law has no specific provision for the protection of TCEs. Customary practices of the indigenous people and the native law of Sarawak have limited effect outside their traditional domain. Recordation and documentation of TCEs are the prime initiatives, but the documents or the recordings do not carry any legal status.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited only to the Mah Meri tribe with a comparison drawn to the Dayak Iban and Dayak Bidayuh tribe.

Practical implications

The research examines the practical implications of copyright and recording and documentation of cultural expression in Malaysia.

Social implications

The research sets to unearth and highlight the ideation process in a tribal setting and how that clashes with the formal creation setting in a modern intellectual property system.

Originality/value

This paper was presented at the IAITL Congress 2013. It also appeared in the Conference Proceedings edited by Slyvia Kieerkgard, but it has not been published in any journals.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 59 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Tolulope Balogun and Trywell Kalusopa

The purpose of this study is to assess the digital preservation policies and plans for long-term digital preservation in selected repositories in South Africa, with a view…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the digital preservation policies and plans for long-term digital preservation in selected repositories in South Africa, with a view to develop a digital preservation framework for the preservation of Indigenous knowledge system (IKS) in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the multiple case study research design, data was obtained from eight respondents in four Indigenous Knowledge Systems Documentation Centers (IKSDCs) in institutions that are part of the National Recordal Systems (NRS) initiative across four provinces in South Africa using in-depth face-to-face interviews. Data collected was also supplemented with the content analysis of several policy documents in South Africa.

Findings

The findings reveal that there are no digital preservation policies in place in the institutions, especially long-term digital preservation for IKS. However, some of the institutions are formulating policies that will include the management of IKS collected in the institutions. This study also reveals that digital curation, policy formulation and disaster preparedness plans to some extent are measures said to be in place for the digital preservation of IKS.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses mainly on the NRS initiative in South Africa. Indigenous Knowledge (IK) related to traditional medicine, traditional plants and food are currently being digitized at the IKSDCs by IK recorders. This study will help in ensuring that the South African Government’s effort and investment in digitizing IKS and making them accessible online is not wasted. This study will help mitigate the risk of damage and alteration over time, either deliberately or in error.

Originality/value

This study fills a gap in the literature on the digitization and digital preservation of IKS from the context of the NRS project in South Africa. Very few studies have been carried out on the digital preservation of IKS in Africa. This study also proposed a framework for the digital preservation of IKS in South Africa.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2018

Solmaz Forutnani, Mohsen Nowkarizi, Mohammad Reza Kiani and Hamid Reza Mokhtari Aski

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential or actual role of rural libraries in preserving indigenous knowledge (IK) of the rural residents in South…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential or actual role of rural libraries in preserving indigenous knowledge (IK) of the rural residents in South Khorasan province.

Design/methodology/approach

The study, based on a qualitative research, was carried out by employing the grounded theory method. Data were collected by semi-structured interviews from the research sample population which included 20 rural males, 10 rural females, 8 librarians and 3 well-informed regional IK specialists. The validity of the research was confirmed by peer evaluation, compounded by detailed thorough explanations and external reviewers’ reaffirmations.

Findings

The rural residents of the South Khorasan villages across the province, after having realized the vitality of carrying out this project, were fully motivated and cooperative to provide indigenous knowledge. On the basis of the results from the rural libraries, due to being the solitary knowledge center in the area, these libraries could actively participate in preserving the knowledge and contribute toward the documentation of the indigenous knowledge. This required motivating librarians and increasing their professional, technical, research and verbal skills. The results of the study indicated that, even if the rural libraries of the South Khorasan province did not participate in documentation, preservation, and promotion of the IK and opt for the present form of non-participation, due to their inherent nature, they could become a focal point and play an indispensable role in achieving the objectives by aiding and leading the process at country level and become a focal point for the new generations of rural inhabitants to enlighten themselves and become fully aware of the value of the ancestral knowledge.

Originality/value

Hitherto, none of the researchers in Iran has covered the role of the libraries in general and rural libraries in particular in preserving the indigenous knowledge.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Priti Jain

The purpose of the paper is to explore the role of information and communication technology (ICT) using a knowledge management (KM) approach. The knowledge in the context…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to explore the role of information and communication technology (ICT) using a knowledge management (KM) approach. The knowledge in the context of this paper refers to indigenous knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a literature review.

Findings

The discussion suggests that, in spite of various infrastructural limitations in Africa, KM applications can still play a vital role in indigenous knowledge management and consequently empowering Africa's development.

Research limitations/implications

The major hindrance is the fact that Africa has thus far achieved little on its own; rather it has been emulating the progress made in the developed world. Because of this, there is a scarcity of in‐depth knowledge related to an African context. In truth, some areas in which ICT has the potential to change, pertaining to the economy and society, have not been observed in any way. More research is required to identify specific needs of a country.

Practical implications

The paper supposes that in spite of all these variations and implications KM can be adapted for indigenous knowledge. The paper contributes in terms of the literature review to showing how tacit knowledge can be managed using ICT. It can be useful for the researchers and knowledge workers. Recommendations are made concerning what needs to be done to improve ICT conditions in Africa such as: ICT policy formulation; literacy programs; legal and regulatory framework; manpower training; and empowerment of local people.

Originality/value

Little has been done in Africa to explore the potential of using ICT as a mechanism with a knowledge management approach, in the thrust of Africa's development. This paper proposes how it is possible to use ICT to manage and disseminate indigenous knowledge.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Mary O'Dowd

The purpose of the paper is to analyse non‐indigenous student resistance to indigenous history and to improve non‐indigenous students’ engagement with indigenous history.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to analyse non‐indigenous student resistance to indigenous history and to improve non‐indigenous students’ engagement with indigenous history.

Design/methodology

The paper, based on praxis, is a theoretical discussion of the reasons for non‐indigenous student resistance to indigenous history.

Findings

The paper argues that non‐indigenous imaginings of national self creates indigenous history into a “un‐history” (a history that could not be). The paper suggests non‐indigenous teachers of indigenous history may undertake a broader perspective to prepare students for indigenous history, including fostering a critical appreciation of histiography, Australian colonial art, literature and popular culture, to enable a critical understanding of the national imagining of Australians (as non‐indigenous) in order to enable engagement with indigenous history.

Research limitations/implications

The paper's focus and findings do not presume relevance to indigenous educators of indigenous history, as previous research has shown non‐indigenous students’ reactions to an indigenous educator may differ from an to a non‐indigenous educator.

Originality/value

The paper moves beyond discussions about content of indigenous history to issues of resistance and engagement found amongst non‐indigenous students with regard to indigenous history. The paper suggests a twenty‐first century political approach where there is non‐indigenous ownership of the shared history in (indigenous) Australia history, enabling indigenous history to move from the periphery to the centre of Australian colonial history.

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Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Dina Joana Ocampo, Rozanno Rufino and Junette Fatima Gonzales

The indigenous peoples of the Philippines have had to struggle against historical injustices for centuries. They fought against colonization and the subjugation of their…

Abstract

The indigenous peoples of the Philippines have had to struggle against historical injustices for centuries. They fought against colonization and the subjugation of their cultures and ways of life. Over the decades, their next generations are confronted with exclusion, discrimination, and encroachments on their ancestral domains which have resulted in social and economic disadvantages. An obvious case in point is the lack of sympathetic and affirmative policy directives for the culture-based education of indigenous children and youth. This paper reflects on the policy development processes undertaken to institutionalize inclusion and social justice in indigenous peoples education policies within the K to 12 Basic Education Program. Using the method of narrative inquiry, the stories of reform are told from the point of view of those who facilitated the crafting of these policies. Three narratives demonstrate that contextualized and empowering education strategies and processes transform not only policy but also the policy makers.

Details

Minding the Marginalized Students Through Inclusion, Justice, and Hope
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-795-2

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 January 2020

Rick Colbourne, Peter Moroz, Craig Hall, Kelly Lendsay and Robert B. Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to explore Indigenous Works’ efforts to facilitate Indigenous-led research that is responsive to the socio-economic needs, values and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore Indigenous Works’ efforts to facilitate Indigenous-led research that is responsive to the socio-economic needs, values and traditions of Indigenous communities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is grounded in an Indigenous research paradigm that is facilitated by Indigenous-led community-based participatory action research (PAR) methodology informed by the Two Row Wampum and Two-Eyed Seeing framework to bridge Indigenous science and knowledge systems with western ones.

Findings

The findings point to the need for greater focus on how Indigenous and western knowledge may be aligned within the methodological content domain while tackling a wide array of Indigenous research goals that involve non-Indigenous allies.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the need to develop insights and understandings into how to develop a safe, ethical space for Indigenous-led trans-disciplinary and multi-community collaborative research partnerships that contribute to community self-governance and well-being.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Monica Samuel Chipungahelo

The purpose of this paper is to examine knowledge sharing on traditional vegetables for supporting food security among farmers and other communities in Kilosa district…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine knowledge sharing on traditional vegetables for supporting food security among farmers and other communities in Kilosa district, Tanzania.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study design was employed. Semi-structured questionnaires with both open- and closed-ended questions were used to collect quantitative data in three wards of Kilosa District in Tanzania. Interviews were used to collect qualitative data from three heads of farmer groups, and direct observation was used to validate findings obtained from questionnaires.

Findings

The results showed that farmers used a socialisation approach to share indigenous knowledge about traditional vegetables on production, consumption and preservation.

Research limitations/implications

The study necessitates a need to conduct regular studies on sharing knowledge of traditional vegetables among different communities for supporting food security.

Practical implications

The paper provides a framework for agricultural development planners on how to improve the management of indigenous knowledge on traditional vegetables with scientific knowledge in local communities for improving food security in Tanzania.

Social implications

The paper has an implication for improving knowledge-sharing strategies on traditional vegetables in supporting food security in Tanzania, and other parts of Africa and developed countries. There is a need for knowledge intermediaries to develop knowledge database on production, consumption and preservation of traditional vegetable to increase the dissemination of this knowledge and, hence, improve nutrition and food security.

Originality/value

The paper provides appropriate knowledge-sharing strategies which are needed to improve sharing of indigenous knowledge about traditional vegetables in Tanzania and other developed and developing countries.

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