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Book part
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Laszlo Tihanyi, Anand Swaminathan and Sarah A. Soule

We use insights from resource dependence, institutional theories and social movement theories to examine the indigenization of subsidiary management in the multinational…

Abstract

We use insights from resource dependence, institutional theories and social movement theories to examine the indigenization of subsidiary management in the multinational company (MNC). We discuss the effects of interdependence with local organizations, access to critical resources, and MNC legitimacy in the host country on the indigenization of subsidiary management. We consider the impact of local and extra-local social movement activity as well as the local political opportunity structure in the host country. The organizational variables in the framework include international strategy and experience. We suggest implications for further international management research and practice involving the operation of foreign subsidiaries.

Details

Institutional Theory in International Business and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-909-7

Executive summary
Publication date: 29 March 2016

ZIMBABWE: Indigenisation rule to raise investor unease

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES210224

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2020

Katharine McGowan, Andrea Kennedy, Mohamed El-Hussein and Roy Bear Chief

Reconciliation between Indigenous peoples and the Canadian plurality has stalled. While the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) Calls to Action could be a focusing…

Abstract

Purpose

Reconciliation between Indigenous peoples and the Canadian plurality has stalled. While the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) Calls to Action could be a focusing event, creating a window of opportunity for transformative social innovations; we see coalescing of interest, social capital and investment in decolonization and indigenization in the proliferation of professorships, programs, installations and statements. However, Blackfoot (Siksika) Elder Roy Bear Chief raised significant concerns that Indigenous knowledge, experiences and people are not yet seen as relevant and useful in higher education; such marginalization must be addressed at a systems level for authentic reconciliation at any colonial university. The purpose of this paper was to explore this dual goal of exploring barriers to and opportunities for Indigenous knowledges and knowledge holders to be valued as relevant and useful in the Canadian academy, using a complexity- and systems-informed lens.

Design/methodology/approach

Local Indigenous Elders provided guidance to reflect study purpose and target audience of academics, with an approach that respectfully weaved Westernized research methods and co-learning through indigenous knowledge mobilization strategies. This analysis extends results from a qualitative grounded theory study to explain social processes of professors and administrative leadership in a Canadian mid-sized university regarding barriers and facilitators of implementing TRC Calls to Action. This further interpretation of applied systems and panarchy heuristics broadens understanding to how such micro-social processes are positioned and influence larger scale institutional change.

Findings

This paper discusses how the social process of dominionization intentionally minimizes meaningful system disruption by othering indigenous knowledge and knowledge holders; this form of system-reinforcing boundary work contributes to rigidity and inhibits potentially transformative innovations from scaling beyond individual niches and moments in time. Elders’ consultation throughout the research process, including co-learning the meaning of findings, led to the gifting of traditional teachings and emerging systems and multi-scale framework on the relevance of indigenous knowledges and peoples in higher education.

Research limitations/implications

This study was performed in one faculty of one Canadian institution; an important and potentially widely-present social process was identified. Further research is needed for greater generalizability. Conditions that led to this study are increasingly common across Canada, where at least one third of higher education organizations have explicit indigenization strategies and internationally where the rights and self-determination of indigenous peoples are growing.

Social implications

Insights from this study can inform conversations about social innovation in institutional settings, and the current systems’ resistance to change, particularly when exploring place-based solutions to national/international questions. These initiatives have yet to transform institutions, and while transformation is rarely rapid (Moore et al., 2018), for these potential innovations to grow, they need to be sustainable beyond a brief window of opportunity. Scaling up or deep within the academy seems to remain stubbornly elusive despite attention to the TRC.

Originality/value

This study contributes to a growing literature that explores the possibilities and opportunities between Indigenous epistemologies and social innovation study and practice (McGowan, 2019; Peredo, McLean and Tremblay, 2019; Conrad, 2015), as well as scholarship around Indigenization and decolonization in Canada and internationally.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Abstract

Details

Social Sciences: A Dying Fire
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-041-3

Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2022

César A. Cisneros-Puebla

By reconstructing the meanings, contexts, interests, and topics of conversation held over the years with Kathy Charmaz, this short tribute conceptualizes the indigenization

Abstract

By reconstructing the meanings, contexts, interests, and topics of conversation held over the years with Kathy Charmaz, this short tribute conceptualizes the indigenization of the Grounded Theory Methodology (GTM) from a position of methodological innocence. The main question is about the existence of a global methodology useful for and applicable to all cultures regardless of local epistemologies, theoretical developments, conceptual histories, and methodological legacies existing in each nation. Acknowledging the development of American pragmatism and its effects on the construction of GTM, the way in which divergent epistemological perspectives can affect the research practice conducted by using this methodological approach is explored here. The originality of Charmaz's contribution on the internationalization of GTM is explored from our conversations imbued with my vision as a Spanish-speaking thinker. Arguing about cover-science was productive in opening paths toward the recognition of a virgin field that demanded our attention. This short tribute is an invitation to continue a journey of discovery on the geopolitics of science and on the local or global application of knowledge generated through specific research methodologies. Indigenous grounded theory research can still be a point of axial tension between different options that need to be explored soon to choose the most appropriate one for today's troubled times. During the years to come, the brilliant presence of Charmaz will illuminate the necessary critical reflection on the particularities of practicing GTM in different societies and cultures other than the American one.

Details

Festschrift in Honour of Kathy Charmaz
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-373-2

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Albert Wöcke and Helena Barnard

The South African government actively intervenes in the labor market in the pursuit of redress of social injustice. These interventions are complicated by economics and…

Abstract

The South African government actively intervenes in the labor market in the pursuit of redress of social injustice. These interventions are complicated by economics and have a direct effect on intentions to turnover. In addition, South Africa has a dual labor market, with a high unemployment rate among lesser skilled workers, and a skills shortage at the top of the labor market.

There are four clear eras in the labor market of post-Apartheid South Africa. The first era was after democratic elections in 1994, when the government focused on nation-building with the introduction of indigenization programs. The second era was characterized by economic prosperity and an intensification of indigenization programs. The third era was characterized by rampant state corruption and increased regulatory uncertainty. During this period, the economy stagnated and unemployment increased. Firms restructured and lower-level workers were retrenched and higher-level skilled workers left the country. In 2018, a new president undertook to grow the South African economy and attract foreign direct investment. Despite these efforts, there was a spike in South Africans emigrating, increasing the turnover of highly skilled South Africans of all races.

Economics and politics create both push and pull factors and many unintended consequences, and the dual labor market reacts differently to labor markets than in developed economies. The lower-skilled employees lose their jobs as the economy contracts, while highly skilled jobs remain difficult to fill. However, skilled professionals nonetheless feel increasingly uncertain about their future employability.

Details

Global Talent Retention: Understanding Employee Turnover Around the World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-293-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Soumen Kumar Roy, A.K. Sarkar and Biswajit Mahanty

The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of a critical subsystem development indigenously on the outcome of an Indian defence R&D project. Indigenous development…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of a critical subsystem development indigenously on the outcome of an Indian defence R&D project. Indigenous development of the critical subsystem requires the development of a number of technologies; hence the study is taken up for indigenously development of critical subsystem.

Design/methodology/approach

A simulation-based approach is used in this paper for studying the effect of indigenization decisions. A defence R&D project with the critical subsystems is modeled in Graphical Evolution and Review Technique (GERT) networks, and simulated in Arena simulation software using discrete event simulation model. The simulation model is thereafter experimented with decision options for the critical subsystem. Data were collected from the project management office (PMO) of short range homing guided missile (SRHGM) for this simulation study.

Findings

It has been found in this case that timely development of technology plays a key role in the Indian defence R&D projects. While indigenization of critical components reduces cost of development, the trade-off lies in much increased project development time. It is imperative that project teams should identify critical components early and work out appropriate strategies of indigenous development to avoid time overrun of the projects.

Research limitations/implications

The accuracy of results of the study could perhaps be affected on account of the extent of data forthcoming from the PMO. However, GERT framework presented in this paper is realistically derived from the practices used in the SRHGM project.

Originality/value

The study would help the project teams to identify critical subsystems early and work out appropriate strategies of indigenous development to avoid time overrun of the projects. This study would also make the project as well as the R&D teams aware of the causes for delays and cost overruns, and assist to deliver a product meeting end-user requirements.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2022

Andrew George

This chapter explores the development of the Professional Cook – Indigenous content program in the province of British Columbia (BC), Canada. Chef Andrew George…

Abstract

This chapter explores the development of the Professional Cook – Indigenous content program in the province of British Columbia (BC), Canada. Chef Andrew George, Wet'suwet'en professionally trained cook, shares his knowledge and experiences in participating in the planning, program development, and delivery of the culinary training program. The Indigenization of the Professional Cook program was made possible through leadership and collaboration between government; training institutions; Indigenous elders, traditional knowledge keepers and communities; industry and businesses. The chapter interweaves reports from the schools, training institutions, and government; highlights from the programs; Indigenous foodways and recipes; and highlights on how such culinary education and training programs can help provide ways toward food sovereignty.

Details

Decolonizing and Indigenizing Visions of Educational Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-468-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Dina Joana Ocampo, Rozanno Rufino and Junette Fatima Gonzales

The indigenous peoples of the Philippines have had to struggle against historical injustices for centuries. They fought against colonization and the subjugation of their…

Abstract

The indigenous peoples of the Philippines have had to struggle against historical injustices for centuries. They fought against colonization and the subjugation of their cultures and ways of life. Over the decades, their next generations are confronted with exclusion, discrimination, and encroachments on their ancestral domains which have resulted in social and economic disadvantages. An obvious case in point is the lack of sympathetic and affirmative policy directives for the culture-based education of indigenous children and youth. This paper reflects on the policy development processes undertaken to institutionalize inclusion and social justice in indigenous peoples education policies within the K to 12 Basic Education Program. Using the method of narrative inquiry, the stories of reform are told from the point of view of those who facilitated the crafting of these policies. Three narratives demonstrate that contextualized and empowering education strategies and processes transform not only policy but also the policy makers.

Details

Minding the Marginalized Students Through Inclusion, Justice, and Hope
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-795-2

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Decolonizing and Indigenizing Visions of Educational Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-468-5

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