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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2020

Swagata Chakraborty and Amrut Sadachar

The present study compared Indian consumers' attitude (AT) toward and purchase intention (PI) from Western apparel brands, as a function of their Western acculturation…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study compared Indian consumers' attitude (AT) toward and purchase intention (PI) from Western apparel brands, as a function of their Western acculturation (WA), consumer ethnocentrism (CE) in apparel consumption, consumer cosmopolitanism (CC) and country of residence (India vs the USA).

Design/methodology/approach

The sample included Indians residing in India and the USA, who were 19 years or older, and visited online or brick-and-mortar apparel stores. An online survey was administered through Amazon Mechanical Turk to collect the data. The data was analyzed through multi-group structural equation modeling.

Findings

WA engenders CE among Indian consumers, especially among Indians residing in India. WA and CC positively influence AT. CE did not have a significant negative influence on AT. Although a high CE lowers the PI, a high WA, CC and positive AT can translate into high PI.

Research limitations/implications

The study did not use an experimental design. Therefore, causal relationships between the research variables could not be explained. Majority of the respondents were male. This might have confounded the findings with potential gendered effects.

Practical implications

Western apparel brands targeting Indian consumers in India and the USA should focus on projecting their cosmopolitan and pro-Indian image to target this population's cosmopolitan and ethnocentric outlook, thereby enhancing PI.

Originality/value

The study proposed and empirically tested a conceptual model indicating the relationship between some of the important predictors of Indian consumers' PI in the context of Indians residing in the USA and India.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Shubhapriya Bennur and Byoungho Jin

Apparel product attributes on which consumers place importance may change as a country's economy progresses. Built on Kano's theory, this paper seeks to categorize…

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1057

Abstract

Purpose

Apparel product attributes on which consumers place importance may change as a country's economy progresses. Built on Kano's theory, this paper seeks to categorize important apparel attributes in USA (developed country) and India (developing country) and compares the results to predict the pattern of change.

Design/methodology/approach

The research involved questionnaire surveys from a sample of 670 college students in two countries: the USA (335) and India (335). Data was collected from a Midwestern university in the USA and from colleges affiliated with a university in southern India.

Findings

The attributes assigned to Kano's categories of must‐be, performance, and attractive were found to be different by respondents from the USA and India. For example, “fitting” is classified as a must‐be category for US consumers while it belongs to performance category for Indian consumers. “Brand” was an indifferent category in the USA while it was classified as an attractive category for Indian consumers.

Practical implications

The findings provide US apparel companies with more definitive information on effective marketing strategies for the Indian market and similar developing countries. For example, companies seeking to do business in India must understand that important attributes for Indian consumers will change as the country progresses.

Originality/value

Though previous studies on consumer evaluation of apparel product attributes exist, they failed to examine how important attributes for consumers’ purchase decision changes. This study makes a new contribution to the discipline by providing means to anticipate future important attributes.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Nitin Gupta

The purpose of this paper is to study the extent of behavioral acculturation of consumer culture (B‐ACC) and attitudinal acculturation of consumer culture (A‐ACC) among…

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1745

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the extent of behavioral acculturation of consumer culture (B‐ACC) and attitudinal acculturation of consumer culture (A‐ACC) among the urban, educated, middle class Indian consumers. It also aims to test if B‐ACC and A‐ACC among various demographic segments of Indian consumers differ on the basis of their ownership/usage of foreign brands vis‐à‐vis Indian brands.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study has been conducted to address the above mentioned objectives. Data have been collected from urban, educated, middle class Indian consumers using structured questionnaire and following snowball and judgment sampling methods. Data analysis has been done using ANOVA and T‐test.

Findings

The results show that highly educated Indian consumers who fall under the age group of 16‐25 years and belong to upper‐middle class show greater levels of B‐ACC as well as A‐ACC vis‐à‐vis other demographic segments of Indian consumers. In the total sample as well as among all the demographic segments, it was observed that B‐ACC is significantly higher than A‐ACC. Indian consumers who own/use foreign brands show significantly higher B‐ACC across most of demographic segments.

Practical implications

The research clearly identifies the segment which would be most receptive to the globalized marketing strategies of various multinational corporations.

Originality/value

The paper shows the extent of B‐ACC and A‐ACC among the Indian consumers. It provides empirical support to the contention in the extant literature that B‐ACC would be greater than A‐ACC among consumers in the emerging markets.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Nitin Gupta

The purpose of this paper is to empirically substantiate if the forces of globalization are impacting consumer culture and behavioral traits in a developing country (India).

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8036

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically substantiate if the forces of globalization are impacting consumer culture and behavioral traits in a developing country (India).

Design/methodology/approach

Five hypotheses had been constructed to address the gaps in the literature with respect to the influence of globalization on prevalent consumer culture of a developing nation. Predisposition towards foreign brand among Indian consumers was taken as a proxy for global flows and its influence was studied on the existing materialistic values among the Indian consumers. The study covered a sample size of 557 respondents from five major cities in India. The raw data were collected with the help of structured questionnaire and analysis was done by using various relevant statistical techniques.

Findings

The results showed that predisposition towards foreign brands had a significant impact on materialistic values among the Indian consumers. The younger Indian consumers had significantly higher materialistic values than the older age groups. Lower income groups have showed significantly greater materialistic values than the higher income groups. Significant positive relationships were shown between materialistic values and the buyer behavior traits studied.

Practical implications

The managers should concentrate on the younger consumers, as they are the ones who are showing a definitive change in their buying behavior and increasing materialistic values. Alternatively, managers could modify their products to suit the requirements of older consumers.

Originality/value

The study empirically showed that Indian consumers' predisposition towards foreign brands and their materialistic values had significant positive correlation among them. Also, predisposition towards foreign brands along with demographical variables like age and gender significantly impact the materialistic values prevalent among Indian consumers.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Archana Kumar, Ann Fairhurst and Youn-Kyung Kim

The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of personal cultural orientation variables as antecedents of ethnocentric tendencies of Indian consumers. The impact…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of personal cultural orientation variables as antecedents of ethnocentric tendencies of Indian consumers. The impact of ethnocentric tendencies on attitudes toward both foreign and domestic products and services is also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by means of a pen-and-paper survey from 800 Indian consumers using a geographical cluster sampling method. A structural equation modeling approach was employed to analyze the data.

Findings

The findings suggest that Indian consumers with high ethnocentric tendencies prefer domestic product/service while those with low ethnocentric tendencies prefer foreign product/service. Ethnocentrism is influenced by personal cultural orientations of Indian consumers (i.e. collectivism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance).

Practical implications

The results reveal that both domestic and foreign marketers need to pay attention to personal cultural orientation in order to understand their customer's ethnocentricity. This could lead to development of better strategies as ethnocentrism has a direct impact on attitudes toward their products/services.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the limited literature on the ethnocentric tendencies of Indian consumers.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

Byoungho Jin, Jin Yong Park and Jay Sang Ryu

US apparel firms have been relatively slow exploring Chinese and Indian apparel markets, despite the countries' tremendous growth potentials. To help US apparel firms…

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3469

Abstract

Purpose

US apparel firms have been relatively slow exploring Chinese and Indian apparel markets, despite the countries' tremendous growth potentials. To help US apparel firms successfully enter these promising markets, this study aims to compare evaluative attributes that Chinese and Indian consumers utilize when purchasing denim jeans.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in Shanghai, China and Bangalore, India.

Findings

The results of the study confirmed that Chinese and Indian consumers ranked attributes differently. Chinese consumers placed the highest importance on price, followed by fitting, brand country of origin, quality, and design, whereas Indian consumers placed importance on fitting, brand country of origin, design, price, and quality, in descending order.

Research limitations/implications

Caution needs to be exercised in generalizing the findings since the data for this study were collected from one city in each country. The study tested the idea that the importance of attributes would be different between Chinese and Indian consumers as their cultures and retail development stages differ. This idea was supported in conjoint analysis.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that a regional approach, assuming that all Asian markets are the same, is inappropriate. Thus, US apparel firms need to pay careful attention to differences in each Asian market.

Originality/value

China and India have been compared frequently in various ways: growth potential, market size, and population. Surprisingly, however, no study has attempted to compare Chinese and Indian consumers' evaluative criteria for apparel products. This is the first empirical study to show the differences between Chinese and Indian consumers in evaluating apparel products.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Arpita Khare

The purpose of this paper is to examine affect of cosmopolitanism and consumers’ susceptibility to interpersonal influence on Indian consumers’ fashion clothing…

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2985

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine affect of cosmopolitanism and consumers’ susceptibility to interpersonal influence on Indian consumers’ fashion clothing involvement. Moderating effect of demographics was studied.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey technique through self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection in both metropolitan and non-metropolitan cities in India.

Findings

Utilitarian, value expressive factors of normative influence and cosmopolitanism influence Indian consumers’ fashion clothing involvement. Type of city, income, and education moderated influence of normative values and cosmopolitanism on fashion clothing involvement.

Research limitations/implications

One of the major limitations of current research was that it had a large number of respondents in the age group of 18-40 years. Future research can attempt to reduce age biasness.

Practical implications

The findings can prove helpful to international apparel brands marketing luxury and fashion clothing in India. However, since conformance to social norms was important for Indians, clothing manufacturers should use reference groups, opinion leaders, and celebrities to generate awareness. A blend of global and local lifestyle should be used. International luxury brands can customize their products to combine ethnic tastes.

Originality/value

Fashion clothing market promises immense growth opportunities in India. There is limited research to examine influence cosmopolitanism on Indian consumers’ consumption behaviour. Knowledge about influence of global lifestyle, brands, mass media, and services on Indian consumers’ behaviour can help in targeting them effectively.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Arpita Mukherjee, Divya Satija, Tanu M. Goyal, Murali K. Mantrala and Shaoming Zou

The purpose of this paper is to assess Indian consumers' brand consciousness by examining their brand knowledge, purchase behaviour and perceptions of foreign brands. It…

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4770

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess Indian consumers' brand consciousness by examining their brand knowledge, purchase behaviour and perceptions of foreign brands. It provides key inputs for global retailers to harness the potential in growing consumerism in India.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 300 Indian consumers was conducted and the data were analysed using descriptive and simple regression techniques.

Findings

The study found that brand purchase in India varies across product categories. At present, consumer knowledge and use of foreign brands is low, and Indian consumers are price‐sensitive. Indian consumers are experimenting with brands and would like more foreign brands to enter the Indian market.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the small sample size, advanced econometrics techniques could not be used to analyse the dataset.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to assess the impact of retail liberalisation on Indian consumers' shopping behaviour, particularly their brand consciousness.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Arpita Khare, Dhiren Achtani and Manish Khattar

The current research aims to explore influence of shopping motives and price perceptions on Indian consumers' attitude towards mall retailer promotions. Effect of price…

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3524

Abstract

Purpose

The current research aims to explore influence of shopping motives and price perceptions on Indian consumers' attitude towards mall retailer promotions. Effect of price discounts, gifts, coupons, and rebates offered by mall retailers to attract store traffic were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through mall intercept technique in six cities across India. Convenience sampling method was used to target metropolitan and non-metropolitan cities for data collection.

Findings

Results suggest that consumers' attitude towards mall retailers' promotional strategies is influenced by shopping values and price consciousness, deal proneness, and coupon proneness. Age, education, and income influence consumers' attitude towards promotions.

Research limitations/implications

Only three constructs of price perception scale were used for the research. Future research can include all the items of price perception scale to understand its applicability on Indian sample. Promotions offered by branded and non-branded retailers in malls were not examined.

Practical implications

The findings can be useful to mall retailers for designing promotions to increase footfalls and sales. Promotions can be used by retailers to convey value and attract price conscious consumers. Retailers need to match their promotional offers according to price sensitivity and shopping motives of consumers.

Originality/value

There is limited research to examine role of promotions used by mall retailers in attracting footfalls in Indian malls. The influence of price perceptions and shopping motives on promotions offered by retailers in Indian malls has not been examined.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Nitin Gupta

The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent of susceptibility to interpersonal influence and price sensitivity prevalent among Indian youth, to test if there is a…

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757

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent of susceptibility to interpersonal influence and price sensitivity prevalent among Indian youth, to test if there is a relationship between these two constructs and identify the reason for the same.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to empirically test the given objectives, instruments to measure susceptibility to interpersonal influence as well as price sensitivity were developed by using inputs from the literature. Responses were elicited from a sample of Indian youth (between 16 to 25 years) residing in various Indian cities. Relevant statistical tools were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Indian youth showed high scores on their traditional consumer behavioral traits of susceptibility to interpersonal influence and price sensitivity. It was shown that susceptibility to interpersonal influence had a significant impact on the level of price sensitivity among Indian youth. Gender played a significant role in this relationship.

Practical implications

The results provide many interesting insights with respect to the consumer behavioral traits of Indian youth. These insights will enable managers to develop effective marketing‐mix strategies, which would cater to the requirements of the Indian youth population.

Originality/value

This is the only contemporary paper in the extant literature which measures the level of susceptibility to interpersonal influence and price sensitivity prevalent among Indian youth and which attempts to identify an empirical relationship among these important constructs.

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