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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Fiona Sherwood-Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to consider independent advocates’ perspectives on their roles in Scottish adult support and protection (ASP) work, and the facilitators and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider independent advocates’ perspectives on their roles in Scottish adult support and protection (ASP) work, and the facilitators and barriers impacting on these roles in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 managers and staff from six independent advocacy agencies operating across nine local authority areas.

Findings

Participants described key roles in supporting individuals to understand their rights and to negotiate ASP processes. They conceptualised their independence to be the key distinguishing feature of their role. Participants noted lower than expected rates of referral of ASP concerns to advocacy and variable experiences of communication with the statutory services. Particular emphasis was placed on the late stage at which many referrals are received. Awareness, understanding and acceptance of advocacy amongst the statutory services was felt to vary at both practice and strategic levels.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is not a representative one. However, some commonalities are worthy of note: particularly the participants’ commitment to ASP work and the perceived impact of statutory agencies on their involvement in it. The issue of late referrals merits some consideration at a national level. Issues of awareness and understanding amongst the statutory services, and their links with referral rates, are for further local-level exploration. The independent advocacy community might wish to discuss further the impacts on them of incorporation into statutory frameworks.

Originality/value

Advocacy perspectives have been little drawn on in pre-existing ASP research.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Peter Scourfield

This paper comments on emerging themes derived from recent official publications on older people's advocacy in the UK. There is an examination of relevant policy documents…

Abstract

This paper comments on emerging themes derived from recent official publications on older people's advocacy in the UK. There is an examination of relevant policy documents and the responses from service user groups. Discussion includes: clarity in defining advocacy; the nature of the advocacy relationship; sustained and reliable financing of advocacy services; the uneven nature of provision; lack of inter‐agency connectivity; the need to establish national standards for advocacy; problems of mental capacity; and advocacy for care home residents and for minority groups. The need for and direction of further research is proposed.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Andy Bradley

Abstract

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Working with Older People, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Georgina Watts

The need for advocacy for autistic adults is emphasised in many government policy and good practice guidelines. The purpose of this paper is to investigate legislation and…

Abstract

Purpose

The need for advocacy for autistic adults is emphasised in many government policy and good practice guidelines. The purpose of this paper is to investigate legislation and policy relevant to advocacy for autistic adults in England and explore whether this translates into practice. It also seeks to clarify which policies can be enforced under current legislation and highlight the gaps in legislative power to ensure implementation of good practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper aims to define what is meant by autism advocacy. Relevant legislation, including human rights, disability and autism-specific guidelines, are discussed in respect to autistic adults in England.

Findings

Implementation of autism advocacy policy appears to vary greatly according to local and individual resources.

Originality/value

Autistic adults, and services that support them, may be unaware of the policies and guidelines relevant to advocacy, they may also be confused by the plethora of different guidelines or unsure how to implement these. Further research is needed to review obstacles to the practical application of autism advocacy policy.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Sarah P. Lonbay and Toby Brandon

The increased involvement of adults at risk in the safeguarding process has become a prominent issue within English safeguarding policy. However, there is evidence to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The increased involvement of adults at risk in the safeguarding process has become a prominent issue within English safeguarding policy. However, there is evidence to suggest that actual levels of involvement are still low. The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a PhD study in relation to the benefits of advocacy in supporting this involvement in adult safeguarding for older people.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants in the study included advocates and social workers who had experience of working with older people through the safeguarding process within two North East England local authorities. A critical realist approach through in-depth interviews was taken with all the participants.

Findings

The research findings in relation to the benefits of advocacy in supporting older people going through safeguarding processes are reported. The practical limitations and factors which help and hinder advocacy support within the process are also considered. The theoretical implications for power, empowerment, and advocacy are also explored.

Research limitations/implications

A key limitation of this research is that it did not include older people who had been through safeguarding amongst the participants.

Practical implications

Key implications for practice and policy are discussed.

Originality/value

The paper provides an overview and critique of empowerment in adult safeguarding and the role that advocates play in promoting this key principle.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 10 March 2011

Geraldine Brown and Nicola Standen

Advocacy has long been identified as a valuable mechanism for providing support to individuals who experience difficulties in accessing services and whose voices often…

Abstract

Advocacy has long been identified as a valuable mechanism for providing support to individuals who experience difficulties in accessing services and whose voices often remain unheard in decisions relating to meeting their individual needs. However, the advocacy needs of older people age 65 and over with mental health problems remains a relatively under‐researched area.This paper presents findings from a small study undertaken in partnership with Sandwell Advocacy, a voluntary sector organisation, and researchers from Coventry University in one local authority area in the West Midlands. The aims of the study were to explore the advocacy needs of people aged 65 years and over with mental health problems and to determine the current level of demand or need for advocacy among this user group. A key motivation for this study was to explore the ways in which advocacy could provide a ‘voice’ to those whose needs are often marginalised in both social care service provision and wider society.

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Working with Older People, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Rob Greig

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on the preceding article “Changing organisational culture: another role for self-advocacy”.

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288

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on the preceding article “Changing organisational culture: another role for self-advocacy”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper suggests that self-advocacy has the potential to be a significant influence on organisational culture, but questions whether self-advocacy's current funding regime and limited focus on outcomes makes this possible.

Research limitations/implications

This issue is identified as one where further research would be beneficial.

Practical implications

If organisations are to use self-advocacy as a route of cultural change, it is suggested that attention will need to be given to issues of independent funding, management change objectives and whole system change.

Originality/value

If evidence were generated to support the belief that self-advocacy can impact on organisational culture, the consequences for how society and services behave towards people with learning disabilities could be significant.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2009

Neil Mapes

The Mental Capacity Advocacy Project (MCAP) with older people is a three‐year pilot project funded by the Department of Health and Age Concern England; the pilot phase of…

Abstract

The Mental Capacity Advocacy Project (MCAP) with older people is a three‐year pilot project funded by the Department of Health and Age Concern England; the pilot phase of this project is due to finish in October 2009. In this article, the MCAP co‐ordinator, Neil Mapes, highlights some of the voices from the project, discusses some of the emerging issues with the Mental Capacity Act (2005), and highlights the MCAP resources and key messages from the work to date.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Sally Wells

Abstract

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Working with Older People, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Teresa Gorczynska

Abstract

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Working with Older People, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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