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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2009

Abhijit Basu, Deepa Gopinath, Naheed Anjum and Susan Hotchkies

The purpose of this paper is to determine the prevalence of feedback following adverse clinical incident reporting among trainee doctors in obstetrics and gynaecology…

788

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the prevalence of feedback following adverse clinical incident reporting among trainee doctors in obstetrics and gynaecology within the Northwestern Deanery of England.

Design/methodology/approach

An anonymous questionnaire was circulated among the Specialist Registrar trainees within the specialty attending a regional teaching session. The questionnaire was analysed.

Findings

There were 50 responses, of those 45 (90 per cent) had been involved in an adverse clinical incident; 44 had submitted an incident form related to the incident. Three had submitted incident forms without being involved in an adverse incident. Most (80 per cent) had submitted an incident form as well as a related statement. Feedback was available to 23 (51 per cent) of those involved in adverse incidents. More of the senior trainees received feedback than the junior ones. A lecture on clinical incident reporting was available to only 35(70 per cent) of the respondents on the hospital induction day at their latest clinical placement.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to adverse clinical incident reporting among the trainees in a single specialty within one deanery in UK; hence the small numbers.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates the presence of awareness regarding adverse incident reporting among the trainees in a high‐risk specialty. It also shows the suboptimal rate of feedback following adverse incident reporting, which does not encourage a learning environment. It is suggested that a lecture should be dedicated to incident reporting at the junior doctors' induction day programme in every hospital.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the lack of adequate feedback following adverse clinical incident reporting.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

Abhijit Basu, Georgios Theophilou and Rosemary Howell

The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of incident reporting within the Department of Gynaecology at Trafford General Hospital.

310

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of incident reporting within the Department of Gynaecology at Trafford General Hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

A list of all reported clinical incidents in relation to gynaecology at the Trafford General Hospital over a period of two years (January 2005 to December 2006) was obtained. The complaints and claims related to gynaecology were also obtained for the same time period. All complaints and claims were correlated with the reported adverse incidents.

Findings

Of the reported 111 adverse incidents, none resulted in either complaint or claim. None of the complaints resulted in claims but there was no corresponding incident reporting. All the claims were directly related to surgical procedures but no incident reporting was done either. The nursing staff filled in all the 111 adverse incident forms.

Research limitations/implications

This study is only limited to adverse incidents in gynaecology over a short period of time (two years) at a District General Hospital.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates the need to stress the importance of incident reporting to the doctors. It is suggested that a session be dedicated to incident reporting as a part of in‐house training for medical staff of all grades.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the need to impress on the medical staff about the importance of adverse clinical incident reporting.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Brett Bailey

Recognizing the 9/11 attacks as a turning point in the history of American emergency management and response philosophies, this chapter examines the evolution to a…

Abstract

Recognizing the 9/11 attacks as a turning point in the history of American emergency management and response philosophies, this chapter examines the evolution to a standardized National Incident Management System (NIMS). This involved the movement from individual jurisdictional and agency autonomy to adoption of a multilayered system where all efforts are intended to support a response beginning and ending at the local level. This chapter discusses the overarching NIMS doctrine and its incumbent on-scene Incident Command System (ICS) for coordinating on-scene operations. The specific focus is the application to the NIMS and the ICS to law enforcement.

Book part
Publication date: 31 July 2013

Cathy Van Dyck, Nicoletta G. Dimitrova, Dirk F. de Korne and Frans Hiddema

The main goal of the current research was to investigate whether and how leaders in health care organizations can stimulate incident reporting and error management by…

Abstract

Purpose

The main goal of the current research was to investigate whether and how leaders in health care organizations can stimulate incident reporting and error management by “walking the safety talk” (enacted priority of safety).

Design/methodology/approach

Open interviews (N=26) and a cross-sectional questionnaire (N=183) were conducted at the Rotterdam Eye Hospital (REH) in The Netherlands.

Findings

As hypothesized, leaders’ enacted priority of safety was positively related to incident reporting and error management, and the relation between leaders’ enacted priority of safety and error management was mediated by incident reporting. The interviews yielded rich data on (near) incidents, the leaders’ role in (non)reporting, and error management, grounding quantitative findings in concrete case descriptions.

Research implications

We support previous theorizing by providing empirical evidence showing that (1) enacted priority of safety has a stronger relationship with incident reporting than espoused priority of safety and (2) the previously implied positive link between incident reporting and error management indeed exists. Moreover, our findings extend our understanding of behavioral integrity for safety and the mechanisms through which it operates in medical settings.

Practical implications

Our findings indicate that for the promotion of incident reporting and error management, active reinforcement of priority of safety by leaders is crucial.

Value/originality

Social sciences researchers, health care researchers and health care practitioners can utilize the findings of the current paper in order to help leaders create health care systems characterized by higher incident reporting and more constructive error handling.

Details

Leading in Health Care Organizations: Improving Safety, Satisfaction and Financial Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-633-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2022

Karen E. Watkins, Andrea D. Ellinger, Boyung Suh, Joseph C. Brenes-Dawsey and Lisa C. Oliver

The critical incident technique (CIT) is widely used in many disciplines; however, scholars have acknowledged challenges associated with analyzing qualitative data when…

Abstract

Purpose

The critical incident technique (CIT) is widely used in many disciplines; however, scholars have acknowledged challenges associated with analyzing qualitative data when using this technique. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to address the data analysis issues that have been raised by introducing some different contemporary ways of analyzing qualitative critical incident data drawn from recent dissertations conducted in the human resource development (HRD) field.

Design/methodology/approach

This article describes and illustrates different contemporary qualitative re-storying and cross-incident analysis approaches with examples drawn from previously and recently conducted qualitative HRD dissertations that have used the CIT.

Findings

Qualitative CIT analysis comprises two processes: re-storying and cross-incident analysis. The narrative inquiry–based re-storying approaches the authors illustrate include poetic narrative and dramatic emplotting. The analytical approaches we illustrate for cross-incident analysis include thematic assertion, grounded theory, and post-structural analysis/assemblages. The use of the aforementioned approaches offers researchers contemporary tools that can deepen meaning and understanding of qualitative CIT data, which address challenges that have been acknowledged regarding the difficulty of analyzing CIT data.

Research limitations/implications

The different contemporary qualitative approaches that we have introduced and illustrated in this study provide researchers using the CIT with additional tools to address the challenges of analyzing qualitative CIT data, specifically with regard to data reduction of lengthy narrative transcripts through re-storying as well as cross-incident analyses that can substantially deepen meaning, as well as build new theory and problematize the data through existing theory.

Practical implications

A strength of the CIT is its focus on actual events that have occurred from which reasoning, behaviors, and decision-making can be examined to develop more informed practices.

Originality/value

The CIT is a very popular and flexible method for collecting data that is widely used in many disciplines. However, data analysis can be especially difficult given the volume of narrative qualitative data that can result from data collection. This paper describes and illustrates different contemporary approaches analyzing qualitative CIT data, specifically the processes of re-storying and cross-incident analysis, to address these concerns in the literature as well as to enhance and further evolve the use of the CIT method.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 46 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Oluwafemi Oriola, Adesesan Barnabas Adeyemo, Maria Papadaki and Eduan Kotzé

Collaborative-based national cybersecurity incident management benefits from the huge size of incident information, large-scale information security devices and…

Abstract

Purpose

Collaborative-based national cybersecurity incident management benefits from the huge size of incident information, large-scale information security devices and aggregation of security skills. However, no existing collaborative approach has been able to cater for multiple regulators, divergent incident views and incident reputation trust issues that national cybersecurity incident management presents. This paper aims to propose a collaborative approach to handle these issues cost-effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

A collaborative-based national cybersecurity incident management architecture based on ITU-T X.1056 security incident management framework is proposed. It is composed of the cooperative regulatory unit with cooperative and third-party management strategies and an execution unit, with incident handling and response strategies. Novel collaborative incident prioritization and mitigation planning models that are fit for incident handling in national cybersecurity incident management are proposed.

Findings

Use case depicting how the collaborative-based national cybersecurity incident management would function within a typical information and communication technology ecosystem is illustrated. The proposed collaborative approach is evaluated based on the performances of an experimental cyber-incident management system against two multistage attack scenarios. The results show that the proposed approach is more reliable compared to the existing ones based on descriptive statistics.

Originality/value

The approach produces better incident impact scores and rankings than standard tools. The approach reduces the total response costs by 8.33% and false positive rate by 97.20% for the first attack scenario, while it reduces the total response costs by 26.67% and false positive rate by 78.83% for the second attack scenario.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Weiwei Zhu, Jinglin Wu, Ting Fu, Junhua Wang, Jie Zhang and Qiangqiang Shangguan

Efficient traffic incident management is needed to alleviate the negative impact of traffic incidents. Accurate and reliable estimation of traffic incident duration is of…

Abstract

Purpose

Efficient traffic incident management is needed to alleviate the negative impact of traffic incidents. Accurate and reliable estimation of traffic incident duration is of great importance for traffic incident management. Previous studies have proposed models for traffic incident duration prediction; however, most of these studies focus on the total duration and could not update prediction results in real-time. From a traveler’s perspective, the relevant factor is the residual duration of the impact of the traffic incident. Besides, few (if any) studies have used dynamic traffic flow parameters in the prediction models. This paper aims to propose a framework to fill these gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes a framework based on the multi-layer perception (MLP) and long short-term memory (LSTM) model. The proposed methodology integrates traffic incident-related factors and real-time traffic flow parameters to predict the residual traffic incident duration. To validate the effectiveness of the framework, traffic incident data and traffic flow data from Shanghai Zhonghuan Expressway are used for modeling training and testing.

Findings

Results show that the model with 30-min time window and taking both traffic volume and speed as inputs performed best. The area under the curve values exceed 0.85 and the prediction accuracies exceed 0.75. These indicators demonstrated that the model is appropriate for this study context. The model provides new insights into traffic incident duration prediction.

Research limitations/implications

The incident samples applied by this study might not be enough and the variables are not abundant. The number of injuries and casualties, more detailed description of the incident location and other variables are expected to be used to characterize the traffic incident comprehensively. The framework needs to be further validated through a sufficiently large number of variables and locations.

Practical implications

The framework can help reduce the impacts of incidents on the safety of efficiency of road traffic once implemented in intelligent transport system and traffic management systems in future practical applications.

Originality/value

This study uses two artificial neural network methods, MLP and LSTM, to establish a framework aiming at providing accurate and time-efficient information on traffic incident duration in the future for transportation operators and travelers. This study will contribute to the deployment of emergency management and urban traffic navigation planning.

Details

Journal of Intelligent and Connected Vehicles, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-9802

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 March 2021

Manfred Vielberth, Ludwig Englbrecht and Günther Pernul

In the past, people were usually seen as the weakest link in the IT security chain. However, this view has changed in recent years and people are no longer seen only as a…

Abstract

Purpose

In the past, people were usually seen as the weakest link in the IT security chain. However, this view has changed in recent years and people are no longer seen only as a problem, but also as part of the solution. In research, this change is reflected in the fact that people are enabled to report security incidents that they have detected. During this reporting process, however, it is important to ensure that the reports are submitted with the highest possible data quality. This paper aims to provide a process-driven quality improvement approach for human-as-a-security-sensor information.

Design/methodology/approach

This work builds upon existing approaches for structured reporting of security incidents. In the first step, relevant data quality dimensions and influencing factors are defined. Based on this, an approach for quality improvement is proposed. To demonstrate the feasibility of the approach, it is prototypically implemented and evaluated using an exemplary use case.

Findings

In this paper, a process-driven approach is proposed, which allows improving the data quality by analyzing the similarity of incidents. It is shown that this approach is feasible and leads to better data quality with real-world data.

Originality/value

The originality of the approach lies in the fact that data quality is already improved during the reporting of an incident. In addition, approaches from other areas, such as recommender systems, are applied innovatively to the area of the human-as-a-security-sensor.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 December 2018

Takuhiro Kagawa, Sachio Saiki and Masahide Nakamura

In a previous research, the authors proposed a security information service, called Personalized Real-time Information with Security Map (PRISM), which personalizes the…

Abstract

Purpose

In a previous research, the authors proposed a security information service, called Personalized Real-time Information with Security Map (PRISM), which personalizes the incident information based on living area of individual users. The purpose of this paper is to extend PRISM to conduct sophisticated analysis of street crimes. The extended features enable to look back on past incident information and perform statistical analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

To analyze street crimes around living area in more detail, the authors add three new features to PRISM: showing a past heat map, showing a heat map focused on specified type of incidents and showing statistics of incidents for every type. Using these features, the authors visualize the dynamic transition of street crimes in a specific area and the whole region within Kobe city. They also compare different districts by statistics of street crimes.

Findings

Dynamical visualization clarifies when, where and what kind of incident occurs frequently. Most incidents occurred along three train lines in Kobe city. Wild boars are only witnessed in a certain region. Statistics shows that the characteristics of street crimes is completely different depending on living area.

Originality/value

Previously, many studies have been conducted to clarify factors relevant to street crimes. However, these previous studies mainly focus on interesting regions as a whole, but do not consider individual’s living area. In this paper, the authors analyze street crimes according to users’ living area using personalized security information service PRISM.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

David Launder and Chad Perry

There has been little research about incident management decision making within real-life, dynamic emergencies such as urban fire settings. So this research addresses the…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been little research about incident management decision making within real-life, dynamic emergencies such as urban fire settings. So this research addresses the research problem: how do incident managers make decisions in urban fire settings? These decision behaviours cover five areas: assessment of the fireground situation, selection of a decision strategy, determination of incident objectives, deployment and management of firefighting resources and ongoing review of the incident. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Case research was used to examine management of different types of fires, through in-depth interviews with a range of incident managers.

Findings

This research identified five key behavioural elements associated with incident management in urban fire settings such as their application of a mix of recognition-primed, value based, procedural and formal decision strategies throughout the course of an incident rather than a single style.

Research limitations/implications

The in-depth framework of decision making could provide foundations for later research about other emergency settings. And this research is limited to analytic generalisation (Yin, 2009); so quantitative research such as surveys and large scale interviews could be done to further extend the research for statistical generalisation.

Practical implications

The decision procedures uncovered in this research will assist incident managers in many emergencies, assist policy making and foster the development of future incident managers.

Originality/value

The findings expand the knowledge of how incident managers develop situation awareness, make decisions and plans, implement them, and review the incident as it evolves. Another contribution is the comprehensive framework of decision making developed from these findings.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

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